Advertising
Advertising

Pregnancy Checklist: What To Do When Pregnant

Pregnancy Checklist: What To Do When Pregnant

1. Know the common symptoms

If you are feeling a bit off lately, or more specifically, as though your body has been overtaken by a force that distorts, swells, discomforts, exhausts, nauseates, and leaves little to reason, then do not fret. You are simply pregnant and these are extremely common symptoms.

2. Breathe

The most important thing to do upon realizing you are pregnant is to simply breathe. Whether this new reality is a surprise or a well-planned outcome, breathe. That is the only thing the tiny life in your womb needs from you at this moment.

3. Determine your due date

Now that you have caught your breath and are grinning at this new future before you, it is time to determine your due date. The most common method used by healthcare providers is to add two weeks to the beginning of your last menstrual cycle (in order to approximate conception) and then add thirty-eight weeks to establish your approximate due date.

4. Choose your doctor

The next step in your pregnancy checklist is to choose a doctor whom you will be comfortable seeing throughout this journey. Your first appointment will typically be scheduled for the eighth week of your pregnancy. This visit will entail exploring your health history, any risk factors that may be present, recommendations for possible diet or lifestyle changes, and will lastly serve as an opportunity for you to ask your doctor any questions you might have regarding the pregnancy.

Advertising

5. Learn about how to have a healthy pregnancy diet

Highly recommended vitamins and supplements are folic acid (vitamin B9), vitamin D, and iron. Pregnancy multi-vitamins are also available but are not nearly as effective as a balanced diet.

6. Learn about folic acid

Foods that are high in folic acid and recommended in the first trimester include spinach, citrus fruit, and okra. Folic acid protects your baby from brain and spinal cord threats commonly associated with the first trimester.

7. Learn about vitamin D

Excellent sources of vitamin D are asparagus, yogurt, salmon, and eggs. Women are commonly deficient in Vitamin D due to the simple fact that they cannot generate enough of it on their own. Vitamin D is synthesized by skin when exposed to sunlight.

8. Learn about iron

Reliable sources of iron are broccoli, collard greens, lean beef, and chicken. You will eventually have fifty percent more blood flowing through your body and your baby’s body and iron is instrumental in boosting the protein in red blood cells that spread oxygen to other cells.

Advertising

9. Learn about your pregnancy protein needs

Supplementing protein can be achieved through lentils, nuts, cottage cheese, and beans. Pregnant women need an additional 60 grams of protein per day. It is advised that any protein derived from eggs, fish, chicken, or beef should be organic and hormone-free.

10. Figure out what foods and activities suit you

There will be a trial period, in which you will have to test what foods and activities are best for you. If nausea becomes a problem the best route to take is eating little but doing it often. The best medicine for all of these ailments is rest. It is important to get as much of it as you can in the first trimester.

11. Manage physical changes

Alongside changes in your diet there will be changes in your body you will want to manage, as well. One of the most common and early signs of pregnancy is tender and enlarging breasts. There are maternity bras available, which will increase comfort and support throughout the pregnancy.

12. Learn about other possible physical changes

Other physical changes early in the pregnancy might include thicker hair, darkened skin, and acne breakouts. No two women are the same and each is affected by pregnancy differently, but anticipating these potential changes will make them easier to accept.

Advertising

13. Learn about what to avoid

Things to avoid now that you are living for two are alcohol, cigarettes, and recreational drugs like marijuana. Caffeine intake will need to be cut back and all medications, including nonprescription, should be approved by your doctor before use.

14. Learn what foods to avoid

There are also certain foods to avoid, as well. Due to threats of bacteria, parasites, and toxins that can harm your baby it is advised to not consume certain cheeses, unpasteurized dairy products, deli meat, raw or under-cooked eggs, and raw shellfish.

15. Learn about pregnancy danger signs

Be aware of danger signs such as cramping accompanied by bleeding. Your doctor should be consulted immediately if this occurs.

16. Learn when you can find out your baby’s gender

Between ten and thirteen weeks you can have your first ultrasound performed. You will be able to see your baby and hear its heartbeat. Gender will not typically be identified until sixteen to twenty weeks.

Advertising

17. Begin picking out names

One of the most exciting tasks in the pregnancy checklist is to begin the process of choosing a name for the baby. Even though you do not know what you will be having at this point, the act of picking prospective names for the boy or girl will bring you two even closer.

18. Figure out when you want to tell friends and family

Announcing the exciting news to friends and family is entirely up to you; however, complications and the possibility of miscarriage drop substantially upon completion of the first trimester. Many women prefer to wait until this point to share the news because risks are minimized.

19. Consider your finances

Whether you are a good planner or not it will behoove you to examine your finances. Find out what the pregnancy will cost from beginning to end. Then anticipate what monthly costs will look like once the baby is born, taking into consideration such things as diapers, food, and clothing, among other things. Here are some money saving tips to help you with your budgeting.

20. Learn about being intimate with your partner during pregnancy

To conclude this pregnancy checklist, as long as you are not feeling too tired, irritable, sick, lethargic, or stressed to have sex with your partner, then it is perfectly welcome throughout the duration of your pregnancy.

More by this author

Pregnancy Checklist: What To Do When Pregnant How To Make Lavender Lemonade To Get Rid Of Headaches And Anxiety 42 Flowers You Can Eat And How You Can Eat Them How To Burp A Newborn 10 Bizarre Ways of Celebrating the New Year Around the World

Trending in Parenting

1 How to Support a Working Mother as a Working Father 2 14 Helpful Tips for Single Parents: How to Stay Sane While Doing it All 3 Signs of Postnatal Depression And What to Do When It Strikes 4 How to Homeschool in the 21st Century (For All Types of Parents & Kids) 5 The Leading Causes of Prenatal Depression and How to Manage it Best

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Published on January 30, 2019

How to Support a Working Mother as a Working Father

How to Support a Working Mother as a Working Father

In roughly 60 percent of two-parent households with children under the age of 18, both parents work full time. But who takes time off work when the kids are sick in your house? And if you are a manager, how do you react when a man says he needs time to take his baby to the pediatrician?

The sad truth is, the default in many companies and families is to value the man’s work over the woman’s—even when there is no significant difference in their professional obligations or compensation. This translates into stereotypes in the workplace that women are the primary caregivers, which can negatively impact women’s success on the job and their upward mobility.

According to a Pew Research Center analysis of long-term time-use data (1965–2011), fathers in dual-income couples devote significantly less time than mothers do to child care.[1] Dads are doing more than twice as much housework as they used to (from an average of about four hours per week to about 10 hours), but there is still a significant imbalance.

This is not just an issue between spouses; it’s a workplace culture issue. In many offices, it is still taboo for dads to openly express that they have family obligations that need their attention. In contrast, the assumption that moms will be on the front lines of any family crisis is one that runs deep.

Consider an example from my company. A few years back, one of our team members joined us for an off-site meeting soon after returning from maternity leave. Not even two hours into her trip, her husband called to say that the baby had been crying nonstop. While there was little our colleague could practically do to help with the situation, this call was clearly unsettling, and the result was that her attention was divided for the rest of an important business dinner.

This was her first night away since the baby’s birth, and I know that her spouse had already been on several business trips before this event. Yet, I doubt she called him during his conferences to ask child-care questions. Like so many moms everywhere, she was expected to figure things out on her own.

Advertising

The numbers show that this story is far from the exception. In another Pew survey, 47 percent of dual-income parents agreed that the moms take on more of the work when a child gets sick.[2] In addition, 39 percent of working mothers said they had taken a significant amount of time off from work to care for their child compared to just 24 percent of working fathers. Mothers are also more likely than fathers (27 percent to 10 percent) to say they had quit their job at some point for family reasons.

Before any amazing stay-at-home-dads post an angry rebuttal comment, I want to be very clear that I am not judging how families choose to divide and conquer their personal and professional responsibilities; that’s 100 percent their prerogative. Rather, I am taking aim at the culture of inequity that persists even when spouses have similar or identical professional responsibilities. This is an important issue for all of us because we are leaving untapped business and human potential on the table.

What’s more, I think my fellow men can do a lot about this. For those out there who still privately think that being a good dad just means helping out mom, it’s time to man up. Stop expecting working partners—who have similar professional responsibilities—to bear the majority of the child-care responsibilities as well.

Consider these ways to support your working spouse:

1. Have higher expectations for yourself as a father; you are a parent, not a babysitter.

Know who your pediatrician is and how to reach him or her. Have a back-up plan for transportation and emergency coverage.

Don’t simply expect your partner to manage all these invisible tasks on her own. Parenting takes effort and preparation for the unexpected.

Advertising

As in other areas of life, the way to build confidence is to learn by doing. Moms aren’t born knowing how to do this stuff any more than dads are.

2. Treat your partner the way you’d want to be treated.

I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve heard a man on a business trip say to his wife on a call something to the effect of, “I am in the middle of a meeting. What do you want me to do about it?”

However, when the tables are turned, men often make that same call at the first sign of trouble.

Distractions like this make it difficult to focus and engage with work, which perpetuates the stereotype that working moms aren’t sufficiently committed.

When you’re in charge of the kids, do what she would do: Figure it out.

3. When you need to take care of your kids, don’t make an excuse that revolves around your partner’s availability.

This implies that the children are her first priority and your second.

Advertising

I admit I have been guilty in the past of telling clients, “I have the kids today because my wife had something she could not move.” What I should have said was, “I’m taking care of my kids today.”

Why is it so hard for men to admit they have personal responsibilities? Remember that you are setting an example for your sons and daughters, and do the right thing.

4. As a manager, be supportive of both your male and female colleagues when unexpected situations arise at home.

No one likes or wants disruptions, but life happens, and everyone will face a day when the troubling phone call comes from his sitter, her school nurse, or even elderly parents.

Accommodating personal needs is not a sign of weakness as a leader. Employees will be more likely to do great work if they know that you care about their personal obligations and family—and show them that you care about your own.

5. Don’t keep score or track time.

At home, it’s juvenile to get into debates about who last changed a diaper or did the dishes; everyone needs to contribute, but the big picture is what matters. Is everyone healthy and getting enough sleep? Are you enjoying each other’s company?

In business, too, avoid the trap of punching a clock. The focus should be on outcomes and performance rather than effort and inputs. That’s the way to maintain momentum toward overall goals.

Advertising

The Bottom Line

To be clear, I recognize that a great many working dads are doing a terrific job both on the home front and in their professional lives. My concern is that these standouts often aren’t visible to their colleagues; they intentionally or inadvertently let their work as parents fly under the radar. Dads need to be open and honest about family responsibilities to change perceptions in the workplace.

The question “How do you balance it all?” should not be something that’s just asked of women. Frankly, no one can answer that question. Juggling a career and parental responsibilities is tough. At times, really tough.

But it’s something that more parents should be doing together, as a team. This can be a real bonus for the couple relationship as well, because nothing gets in the way of good partnership faster than feelings of inequity.

On the plus side, I can tell you that parenting skills really do get better with practice—and that’s great for people of both sexes. I think our cultural expectations that women are the “nurturers” and men are the “providers” needs to evolve. Expanding these definitions will open the doors to richer contributions from everyone, because women can and should be both—and so should men.

Featured photo credit: NeONBRAND via unsplash.com

Reference

Read Next