Advertising
Advertising

10 Reasons Why You Should Always Pick A Window Seat When You Fly!

10 Reasons Why You Should Always Pick A Window Seat When You Fly!

Do you prefer the aisle, middle or window seat when flying? We would urge you, under normal circumstances, to always go for the window seat.

When you choose the window seat, you’ll have a harder time getting to the bathroom, but at least you won’t be the one being bothered every time by a seat mate who wants you to move so he can go to the bathroom. There is a wall on one side so, for the most part, you are insulated enough that you won’t be affected by other people’s behavior.

“You can create your own little space by the window,” says, psychologist and University of Washington professor Jonathan Bricker, Ph.D. The spot feels cozier, and you can rest a pillow against the wall for more comfy naps. “You can create a little bit of a home,” he says. But, the fact that the window seat allows you to watch breathtaking views outside of that window—that is what is most compelling.

Appreciating beauty in this world from the window seat.

As adults, we often miss the magical experience that is flying. You actually know you are an adult, someone jokingly said, when you no longer clamor for the window seat.

Without a doubt the world is a beautiful place, one that looks entirely different from up above. From stunning sunrises and sunsets, to awe-inspiring cityscapes and landscapes and mesmerizing cloud formations, the beauty from up there is boundless and magical. You’re invariably rewarded when you remember to look.

For instance, the views outside that window of the actual Rocky Mountains from 30,000-feet above sea level are infinitely better than watching an in-flight movie about the Rockies. What such majestic views bring to our lives, our perspectives and our outlooks is undeniably the stuff of dreams.

Advertising

If you don’t quite believe us, here are some pictures that give you more reasons why you should always ask for a window seat. These pictures will help you think about how much of life and beauty you’ll be missing out on when you forego the window seat or let your fear of flying overcome you.

1. The sunrises are spectacular from the skies.

sunrise-from-an-airplane-window

    In this photo, the early morning light illuminates Dusseldorf in a breathtaking new way, as seen from a window seat. Beautiful sight. (Photo credit: Florian Seiffert/Flickr.)

    2. And sunsets are pretty epic too.

    sunset-from-an-airplane-window

      As spectacular as sunrises are, sunsets are equally spectacular when viewed from the air. (Photo credit: Oblivious Dude/Flickr.)

      3. You could even see a rainstorm like this off in the distance.

      Advertising

      distant-storm-cloud-seen-from-airplane-window

        Wow, just take a look at that rainstorm, as seen from this airplane window. It’s simply amazing. It puts everything into perspective in a breathtaking way. (Photo credit: Haley Luna/Flickr.)

        4. Or Chicago’s skyline reflected in Lake Michigan.

        chicago-reflected-in-lake-michigan-from-an-airplane-by-mark-hersch

          The Chicago skyline reflected in Lake Michigan, as seen from this airplane window, is rare and quite a spectacle to behold. (Photo credit: Mark Hersch | Twitter.)

          5. What of waterfalls in all their glory? Riveting!

          kaieteur-falls-guayana-from-an-airplane

            Seeing the Kaieteur Falls, Guyana from the ground is majestic in its own right, but it’s an entirely different prospect to view it from the air. The scene is priceless. (Photo credit: Cody H /Flickr.)

            6. And seeing the highest point in Africa will leave you breathless.

            Advertising

            mount-kilimanjaro-from-an-airplane-snow-covered

              There are few things in this world quite as awe-inspiring as seeing the gorgeous, snow covered Mount Kilimanjaro rising out of the ground from your plane window. What a sight! (Photo credit: Kyle Mijlof.)

              7. Enjoy front row views of an endless sea of clouds.

              sea-of-clouds-from-an-airplane

                Seeing ordinary clouds up close in an entirely new way from the comfort of your window seat is such a pleasure. And just riding the clouds for miles on end, it’s spectacular. (Photo credit: Marj Stevens/Flickr.)

                8. Maybe you’ll see your first frozen lake.

                lake-mendota-frozen-from-an-airplane-aerial-view-from-above

                  Occasionally, those by the window seat may see the whole expanse of Lake Mendota frozen from an airplane aerial view. How cool is that? That’s pretty cool. (Photo credit: Alan Wolf/Flickr.)

                  9. Or perhaps, you’ll see your first volcano.

                  Advertising

                  mount-taranaki-volcano-from-an-airplane-aerial-from-above

                    This picture of Mount Taranaki as seen from the airplane window, is nothing short of stunning. Wouldn’t you agree? (Photo credit: Jon Sullivan/Flickr.)

                    10. And even views of a sprawling metropolis are pretty memorable.

                    2D02C6D300000578-0-image-a-7_1443793438368

                      When flying into one of New York City’s several airports, lucky travelers will get a gorgeous view of lower Manhattan. You won’t see views like these from the aisle. (Photo credit: Alamy stock photo.)

                      Featured photo credit: Linh Nguyen via flickr.com

                      More by this author

                      10 Amazing Health Benefits Of Beer Great Leaders Remember to Offer These 10 Things All The Time 10 Things a Real Man Does When He’s in a Relationship 15 Funny English Idioms You May Not Know 10 of the Most Effective Ice Breakers for Starting Meaningful Conversations

                      Trending in Featured

                      1The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder That Works) 240 Top Productivity Apps for iPhone (2018 Updated) 3How to Overcome Procrastination and Start Doing What Matters 4Is Procrastination Bad? The Truth About Procrastination Revealed 5The Gentle Art of Saying No

                      Read Next

                      Advertising
                      Advertising

                      Last Updated on August 16, 2018

                      The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder That Works)

                      The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder That Works)

                      No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

                      Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

                      Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system”.

                      A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

                      Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

                      In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

                      Advertising

                      The power of habit

                      A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

                      For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

                      This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

                      The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

                      That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being six hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

                      Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

                      Advertising

                      The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

                      Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

                      But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

                      The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

                      The wonderful thing about triggers (reminders)

                      A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

                      For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

                      Advertising

                      But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

                      If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

                      For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

                      These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

                      For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

                      How to make a reminder works for you

                      Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

                      Advertising

                      Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

                      Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

                      My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

                      Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

                      I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

                      Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

                      Read Next