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8 Tactics To Make What You Say Sound Smarter And More Eloquent

8 Tactics To Make What You Say Sound Smarter And More Eloquent

Martin Luther King, Jr., Socrates, Billy Graham. What do all of these people have in common? They are all legendary speakers. The course of history has been swayed countless times by great orators and communicators. History is the actions of people, but it’s the inspiration by polished communicators which determines people’s actions. Words are one of the most powerful tools if harnessed well, and yet we can’t even order a Happy Meal without tripping over those supposed “tools.”

In a world that is jam-packed with words–especially with the advent of the internet and social media–how can you make yours stick? How can you make your words cut through the fray and have an impact? It’s all about WHAT you say and HOW you say it. Here are 8 simple tricks that are easy to implement that can improve your ability to communicate well.

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1. Be intentional

Communication is an action; it requires significant, intentional effort. The difference between gifted speakers and babblers is the time and effort invested in preparation and the skills they have at their disposal. The rest of the tips in this article are some skills for you to add to your repertoire, but the groundwork of intention must be there for those skills to have any effect.

2. Never ask questions

When you speak, do so with authority. Don’t sound unsure or held back. When you are making a statement, don’t sound like you are asking a question. Always have an opinion, and know when to share your opinion. Speak with conviction.

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3. Always ask questions

The people deemed “most conversational” are the ones who ask more questions of others than they do share their own thoughts. Approach every conversation with the goal of learning–about others, about new subjects–not the desire to tell others what you know. You have two ears and one mouth for a reason — to listen twice as much as you speak.

4. Don’t think out loud

As you’ve probably heard your mother tell you a million times, you should always think before you speak. A great communicator doesn’t speak OFTEN; he speaks WELL. Make your words matter. Choose them wisely. Good communication isn’t a reaction, it’s an intentional action. If you are quick to respond, you are reacting and aren’t taking the time to make a well thought-out statement.

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5. Eliminate “um”

Communication isn’t the most natural thing for people. From a young age, we must be taught how to communicate. When you say “um” or “uh” or “like,” it is a verbal expression that you use while your brain is processing what and how to communicate next. Cut it out. A couple seconds of silence is okay. Silence is actually a very good thing. It gives you time to think about what you want to say and how to say it well, and it also gives your audience time to chew on what you have said.

6. Have a grandiose vernacular then, use half of it

Know more “big” words than you will ever use. This gives you the ability to converse with every type of conversationalist. You can talk to the average layman and the social elite. Having an extensive vocabulary is one of the easiest ways to sound smart and eloquent–or pretentious and snooty. The trick is to know your audience and adjust your vocabulary accordingly.

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7. Stand Tall

Watch your body language. Only 10-15% of your communication is verbal (words). The remaining 85-90% is nonverbal (primarily body language). How you stand, your hand gestures, facial expressions, how quickly or slowly you speak, the pitch of your voice, when and where you move around–they all communicate significantly more to your audiences than simply your words. Nonverbals can do one of three things: enhance the verbal message, confirm the verbal message, or negate the verbal message. The best posture to show authority and confidence is standing straight up (no slouching) with relaxed shoulders. When sitting, lean forward to show interest and engagement.

8. Expect Critiques

The glory (and pitfall) of communication is that there is no one, clear cut way to communicate. You are allowed creative freedom to say what you want, how you want to say it. But never expect everyone to agree with your choices. Not everyone will connect with your communication style, so expect critiques, and humbly accept them when they come. Take every critique with a grain of salt–there is value in them, but they are also coming from people. People aren’t perfect, and others don’t always know what is best–especially with communication. Know yourself, and be confident in your communication choices, but also remain in a posture that is willing to learn and adapt.

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Austen Broome

Social Media/Public Relations Manager and Copywriter for Liquid Creative

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Last Updated on December 2, 2018

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

1. Connecting them with each other

Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

2. Connect with their emotions

Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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3. Keep going back to the beginning

Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

4. Link to your audience’s motivation

After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

5. Entertain them

While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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6. Appeal to loyalty

Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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