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6 Wonderful Weekend Activities That Cost No Money

6 Wonderful Weekend Activities That Cost No Money

We’re bombarded with advertisements and commercials trying to get us to open our wallets in exchange for entertainment so often that we sometimes forget it’s possible to have a good time without spending any of our hard-earned cash. But it can be done. Not only can it be done, but the weekend activities you can do for free in your home or around town can end up being much more enjoyable, and definitely more memorable, than the ones that costs you an arm and a leg.

1. Take a walk

When was the last time you took a nice leisurely stroll around your neighborhood or through your local park? Luckily, there’s not a price tag on the great outdoors (yet). Getting some fresh air allows you to get some exercise while taking advantage of the surroundings you’ve taken for granted throughout the hustle and bustle of everyday life. Bring your kids out and remind them they don’t need an iPad to be entertained for their weekend activities.

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2. Window shop

Just because you can’t buy anything doesn’t mean you can’t plan to buy something in the future! Take a trip to your local mall or village and take a look around. Pretend you’re rich and famous and can afford that expensive watch or piece of jewelry that always catches your eye, knowing you won’t even be spending a single penny. Better yet, use this time to look for gifts for friends and family, and make a mental note of places to check out when someone’s birthday is coming up. Of course, you can also make a mental note of anything that you want, as well!

3. Go for a drive

Don’t try to get me on the technicality that it costs gas to get anywhere! As long as you have a full tank, you have a few free hours to spend driving aimlessly with the windows down and the stereo blaring. Turn your GPS off and just go without worrying how to get back (then you can turn your GPS back on!). Explore the areas you never got a chance to. And stay off the highway; there’s so much more to see when you take the back roads.

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4. Go to the library

I know, I know: you probably haven’t been to a library since your sophomore year of college. Spend a couple hours browsing through the books you always said you’d read if you had the time. Check out some do-it-yourself texts and pick up a new hobby, read up on some interesting non-fiction, or spend the afternoon lost in a fantasy world. And do it without once having to reach in your pocket!

5. Volunteer

Instead of giving your money away, give away your time. It’s much more valuable, and will help those in need instead of the businesses looking to fatten their own wallets. Visit a local church and see if any soup kitchens or shelters need an extra hand for the day. Not only will you be doing something worthwhile, but you’ll feel better than you would if you went to the mall and spent the day thinking of only yourself.

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6. Play games with your family

The words “family game night” are usually met with groans. That is, until everyone gets involved in a heated game of Trivial Pursuit or Pictionary. All it takes is a few kid-friendly “fighting words,” and pretty soon you’ll all be vying for the title of board game champion. Heck, you could even meet your kids halfway: load up the Wii and get some Mario Party going. You’ll end up having an unforgettable night with the people you cherish the most, and it won’t cost you a single dollar. Sounds absolutely priceless to me!

Featured photo credit: Family Game Night / West Islip Public Library via farm7.staticflickr.com

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Last Updated on April 8, 2020

Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

Assuming positive intent is an important contributor to quality of life.

Most people appreciate the dividends such a mindset produces in the realm of relationships. How can relationships flourish when you don’t assume intentions that may or may not be there? And how their partner can become an easier person to be around as a result of such a shift? Less appreciated in the GTD world, however, is the productivity aspect of this “assume positive intent” perspective.

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Most of us are guilty of letting our minds get distracted, our energy sapped, or our harmony compromised by thinking about what others woulda, coulda, shoulda.  How we got wronged by someone else.  How a friend could have been more respectful.  How a family member could have been less selfish.

However, once we evolve to understanding the folly of this mindset, we feel freer and we become more productive professionally due to the minimization of unhelpful, distracting thoughts.

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The leap happens when we realize two things:

  1. The self serving benefit from giving others the benefit of the doubt.
  2. The logic inherent in the assumption that others either have many things going on in their lives paving the way for misunderstandings.

Needless to say, this mindset does not mean that we ought to not confront people that are creating havoc in our world.  There are times when we need to call someone out for inflicting harm in our personal lives or the lives of others.

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Indra Nooyi, Chairman and CEO of Pepsi, says it best in an interview with Fortune magazine:

My father was an absolutely wonderful human being. From ecent emailhim I learned to always assume positive intent. Whatever anybody says or does, assume positive intent. You will be amazed at how your whole approach to a person or problem becomes very different. When you assume negative intent, you’re angry. If you take away that anger and assume positive intent, you will be amazed. Your emotional quotient goes up because you are no longer almost random in your response. You don’t get defensive. You don’t scream. You are trying to understand and listen because at your basic core you are saying, ‘Maybe they are saying something to me that I’m not hearing.’ So ‘assume positive intent’ has been a huge piece of advice for me.

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In business, sometimes in the heat of the moment, people say things. You can either misconstrue what they’re saying and assume they are trying to put you down, or you can say, ‘Wait a minute. Let me really get behind what they are saying to understand whether they’re reacting because they’re hurt, upset, confused, or they don’t understand what it is I’ve asked them to do.’ If you react from a negative perspective – because you didn’t like the way they reacted – then it just becomes two negatives fighting each other. But when you assume positive intent, I think often what happens is the other person says, ‘Hey, wait a minute, maybe I’m wrong in reacting the way I do because this person is really making an effort.

“Assume positive intent” is definitely a top quality of life’s best practice among the people I have met so far. The reasons are obvious. It will make you feel better, your relationships will thrive and it’s an approach more greatly aligned with reality.  But less understood is how such a shift in mindset brings your professional game to a different level.

Not only does such a shift make you more likable to your colleagues, but it also unleashes your talents further through a more focused, less distracted mind.

More Tips About Building Positive Relationships

Featured photo credit: Christina @ wocintechchat.com via unsplash.com

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