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What Working Mothers Want To Say For So Long

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What Working Mothers Want To Say For So Long

I am a working mother. I get up in the mornings, I get my children ready and then I send them off to daycare while I try to head off to the office to get a paycheck. I think you should know some things that all working mothers have wanted to tell you.

1. There are times I look forward to going to work.

I know that goes against everything I am supposed to feel as a mom. However when they are being little pukes and I drop them off at daycare, it’s hard not to peel out of the driveway. I mean come on; they just fought for 30 minutes about who is looking at whom first. Sure sometimes I attend meetings that could have been better suited to an email, but I never have to referee the meetings for potential who started it.

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2. I get jealous of stay at home moms.

What? But you just said that you look forward to getting away sometimes… Yeah, but the grass is always greener. You know that. The days that I get to stay home with my children are usually due to sickness or unforeseen circumstances. We are never at our best in those times. That means it doesn’t exactly end up being Hallmark material. I get home tired from work. Sometimes I am short with them, and it’s not even their fault.

3. I don’t know how to do everything that is on my plate.

I know I’m supposed to be able to work, clean, cook, and mom. I fall very short in the cleaning category. I have a husband that cooks. When people talk about having it all I don’t know what that means. I don’t really want to do all those things. I want to play make believe. I want to read books.

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4. Sundays I make a point to not get out of my pajamas if possible.

If I have to get dressed and show up to work for “the man” every day during the week and have fun on Saturdays- then I reserve Sunday to be a pile. I’m not sure why, but I think I need to get that off my chest. Some Sundays my husband takes the kids and I get to sit by myself. I feel guilty for that time because I don’t get enough time with my kids. I also don’t get enough time with myself. I’m not saying that a stay at home mom gets any more time to herself either. I would assume that there are demands of others whether it be work or the kids.

5. I cry on my way to work after long weekends spent with my kids.

I miss them. I am scared that I won’t have enough time, and I know they grow up too fast. I worry that they will remember daycare more than they will remember their mom. Yes, sometimes those salty tears are set to the Tinkerbell soundtracks or with other Disney songs that all of the sudden seem so poignant to my situation. How do they know just the right words?

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I’m not sure if any of these revelations are particularly mind blowing. Well, I take that back. Let’s look at number four again, the Sunday one is pretty life changing. If I were you, I’d totally adopt that one. Whether you work or stay home. Heck, whether you have kids or not- that is something I recommend doing.

Is this pretty consistent with how you feel if you are a working mom? I don’t talk to a lot other moms about this subject. What about stay at home moms? Are these points something you can relate to?

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Featured photo credit: pixabay via pixabay.com

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Last Updated on January 5, 2022

How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

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How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

Children are most likely to say that they want to just lounge around or rest for a while after spending hours listening to lecture after lecture from their teachers. There is nothing wrong with this if they had a rough day.

What’s disturbing, is if they deliberately stay away from schoolwork or procrastinate when it comes to reviewing for their tests or completing an important science project.

When it seems that it is becoming a habit for your child to put off school work, it’s time for you to step in and help your child develop good study habits to get better grades. It is important for you to emphasize to your child the importance of setting priorities early in life. Don’t wait for them to flunk their tests, or worse, fail in their subjects before you talk to them about it.

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You can help your children hurdle their tests with these 7 tips:

1. Help them set targets

Ask your child what they want to achieve for that particular school year. Tell them to set a specific goal or target. If they say, “I want to get better grades,” tell them to be more specific. It will be better if they say they want to get a GPA of 2.5 or higher. Having a definite target will make it easier for them to undertake a series of actions to achieve their goals, instead of just “shooting for the moon.”

2. Preparation is key

At the start of the school year, teachers provide an outline of a subject’s scope along with a reading list and other course requirements. Make sure that your child has all the materials they need for these course requirements. Having these materials on hand will make sure that your child will have no reason to procrastinate and give them the opportunity to study in advance.

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3. Teach them to mark important dates

You may opt to give them a small notebook where they can jot down important dates or a planner that has dates where they can list their schedule. Ask them to show this to you so you can give them “gentle reminders” to block off the whole week before the dates of an exam. During this week, advise your child to not schedule any social activity so they can concentrate on studying.

4. Schedule regular study time

Encourage your child to set aside at least two hours every day to go through their lessons. This will help them remember the lectures for the day and understand the concepts they were taught. They should be encouraged to spend more time on subjects or concepts that they do not understand.

5. Get help

Some kids find it hard to digest or absorb mathematical or scientific concepts. Ask your child if they are having difficulties with their subjects and if they would like to seek the help of a tutor. There is nothing wrong in asking for the assistance of a tutor who can explain complex subjects.

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6. Schedule some “downtime”

Your child needs to relax from time to time. During his break, you can consider bringing your child to the nearest mall or grocery store and get them a treat. You may play board games with them during their downtime. The idea is to take his mind off studying for a limited period of time.

7. Reward your child

If your child achieves their goals for the school year, you may give them a reward such as buying them the gadget they have always wanted or allowing them to vacation wherever they want. By doing this, you are telling your child that hard work does pay off.

Conclusion

You need to take the time to monitor your child’s performance in school. Your guidance is essential to helping your child realize the need to prioritize their school activities. As a parent, your ultimate goal is to expose your child to habits that will lay down the groundwork for their future success.

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Featured photo credit: Annie Spratt via unsplash.com

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