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7 Websites to Learn a New Skill For $1 Per Day

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7 Websites to Learn a New Skill For $1 Per Day

Learning a new skill need not be expensive.

Money used to be a big obstacle that got in the way of accomplishing our goals. Luckily, this is no longer the issue.

Whether it’s learning how to build your own website, speak a new language, or become a better entrepreneur, there are resources online available that you can get started with for $1 per day or less

The best part, all of these websites allow you to learn from the comfort of your own home (in your PJ’s).

Here are 7 websites to learn a new skill for $1 per day.

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1. Skillshare

Price: Starting at $10/month (includes free trial)
Focus: Branding, Marketing, Design

Skillshare is a learning community where you can learn anything from anyone. While they have classes from experts such as Seth Godin, Guy Kawasaki, and Gary Vaynerchuk, the majority of the courses are from local experts like yourself who have useful knowledge to share. Learn everything from branding, SEO, audience building, and more from anyone.

They have a free community you can join and their premium plans start from $10/month.

2. CreativeLIVE

Price: Free Live Classes to ~$200 per class
Focus: Photography, Entrepreneurship, Business

CreativeLIVE brings a unique business model, as they provide free live classes that anyone can tune into. Then for those who are interested in keeping the course, they can purchase it.

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Unlike SkillShare, CreativeLIVE focuses on solely bringing on top experts to share their knowledge. These include NYTimes Best Selling Authors such as Tim Ferriss, Pulitzer Prize winners, and more. Their topics are also heavily focused on creativity topics like photography, design, and branding.

3. KhanAcademy

Price: Free
Focus: Mathematics, Science, Engineering

KhanAcademy is one of my highly recommended sites for teenagers and college students. Khan’s ability to breakdown the most complex concepts down to simple components is powerful. The best part is, it’s free!

While their best courses are in mathematics, science, and engineering, they also cover a wide variety of topics including arts & humanities, business & finance, computing, and more.

4. Lynda

Price: Starting at $20/month (includes free trial)
Focus: Video, Design, Developer, Audio + Music

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Lynda is one of the top leaders in the online learning industry, and was recently acquired by Linkedin.

Much like CreativeLIVE or Skillshare, Lynda provides video courses on everything from design, branding, photography, web development, and more. Given the length of time that Lynda has existed, they do have a wider variety of courses available versus CreativeLIVE or Skillshare.

5. Rype

Price: Starting at $35/month (includes free trial)
Focus: Languages (Spanish)

Rype is a language learning website offering the advantages of coaching into language learning. Rype is perfect for those who struggle with persistence when learning something new, or if you have quit learning a language before. Your membership includes one-on-one sessions with your personal coach, free live classes that are recorded for you, personalized feedback guides, accountability, and more to help you reach fluency faster.

You can try it free by signing up for Rype Club.

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6. Coursera

Price: Free
Focus: Classes from top Universities

Coursera brings classes from the top Universities to your screen for free. With Universities like John Hopkins, Stanford, and Yale, you can receive the same education as the students in these Universities without paying hundreds of thousands of dollars.

7. OneMonth

Price: Starting at $49 per course
Focus: Web & Mobile app development

OneMonth has a compelling pitch: learn X in one month. Their main focus in this moment is web and mobile app development, but also provide courses on audience building, social media, and more.

While there are no guarantees that you’ll learn what they’re teaching in one month, it offers a convenient solution for individuals who want to learn skills faster.

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More by this author

Sean Kim

Sean is the founder and CEO of Rype, a language learning app. He's an entrepreneur and blogger.

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Last Updated on November 25, 2021

How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

    What Does Private Browsing Do?

    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

    The Terminal Archive

    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

    Clearing Your Tracks

    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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    dscacheutil -flushcache

    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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