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Don’t Worry About Being Cute. Worry About Being Interesting

Don’t Worry About Being Cute. Worry About Being Interesting

Adolescence is a tough time: you’re still navigating the road between child and adult, but with the added stress of new set of emotions, experiences, and social situations to tackle. Future colleges and universities expect your applications to be full of extracurricular activities and leadership positions, not just above average grades.

Then, in high school, there are the cute girls with their perfectly tousled hair, unchipped nails, and designer clothes. These girls are definitely popular and get the attention of not just our male classmates but also our teachers as well. (Does anyone else find it strange that some teachers seemed to be more focused on gaining the approval of the cute, popular kids over finding innovative ways to teach?) With all this noise, it’s no wonder you’re gravitating towards the benefits of being cute rather than focusing on all the other things that matter, like your grades and your hobbies. Don’t fall for that trap!

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Instead of spending all that time worrying about being cute, spend it figuring out how to be interesting. Here’s why:

Being cute doesn’t get you into college or get you the job of your dreams.

What you look like is normally not a large part of the application process for college or for most jobs – at least not in the initial stages of application review or resume screening. Rather, building out a robust life with interests, hobbies, and exemplary achievements is much more important. It may feel like being cute is the most important thing in the world right now, but in just a few years you’ll wish that you had spent more time making yourself a whole person, with expertise in different things.  That depth is what will give you perspective to perfect your college application, or build an interesting resume that warrants a call back.

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Worrying about being cute may mean you’ll miss out on important life experiences.

Focusing on being cute, and what you think comes along with it such as popularity, fame, and attention, will rob you of more important life experiences. Have you dreamed of experiencing new cultures, or hiking through nature to learn more about yourself, and discover new things? It’s hard to backpack through Europe or Asia with little more than two changes of clothes and no cosmetics when you’re worried about being cute. Are you a budding writer or musician? Distracting your mind with something that’s so fleeting will impact your deeper concentration and future success. Don’t miss out on the rest of life because you’re preoccupied with something that’s extremely short term and short sighted, like being cute.

Worrying about being cute may actually backfire, no matter how cute you are.

Why is being cute so hard to do? Because you have to do it effortlessly. It has to come naturally and you can’t show insecurity. If you’re preoccupied with being cute, and are constantly worried that you need to keep being cute, it won’t seem natural. In fact, you could come across as fake or insincere.

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Your future life partner already thinks you’re cute.

Whomever you end up with won’t care whether or not you were cute before they met you. In fact, they already think you’re incredibly cute – just as you are. If you’re worried that you won’t be able to find someone because you’re not cute as you are, so you change yourself to fit an idea of what is cute, you just won’t attract the right person for you.

Why worry about something you already are?

You may not have noticed it, but you’re already cute! You have your own unique personality and qualities that make you who you are, and that is definitely cute. Don’t worry about trying to be something that you already are.

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Featured photo credit: meikkis5/maria morri via flickr.com

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Last Updated on October 6, 2020

15 Things Highly Confident People Don’t Do

15 Things Highly Confident People Don’t Do

Highly confident people believe in their ability to achieve. If you don’t believe in yourself, why should anyone else put their faith in you? To walk with swagger and improve your self-confidence, watch out for these fifteen things highly confident people don’t do.

And if you want to know the difference between an arrogant person and a confident person, watch this video first:

 

1. They don’t make excuses.

Highly confident people take ownership of their thoughts and actions. They don’t blame the traffic for being tardy at work; they were late. They don’t excuse their short-comings with excuses like “I don’t have the time” or “I’m just not good enough”; they make the time and they keep on improving until they are good enough.

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2. They don’t avoid doing the scary thing.

Highly confident people don’t let fear dominate their lives. They know that the things they are afraid of doing are often the very same things that they need to do in order to evolve into the person they are meant to be.

3. They don’t live in a bubble of comfort.

Highly confident people avoid the comfort zone, because they know this is a place where dreams die. They actively pursue a feeling of discomfort, because they know stretching themselves is mandatory for their success.

4. They don’t put things off until next week.

Highly confident people know that a good plan executed today is better than a great plan executed someday. They don’t wait for the “right time” or the “right circumstances”, because they know these reactions are based on a fear of change. They take action here, now, today – because that’s where progress happens.

5. They don’t obsess over the opinions of others.

Highly confident people don’t get caught up in negative feedback. While they do care about the well-being of others and aim to make a positive impact in the world, they don’t get caught up in negative opinions that they can’t do anything about. They know that their true friends will accept them as they are, and they don’t concern themselves with the rest.

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6. They don’t judge people.

Highly confident people have no tolerance for unnecessary, self-inflicted drama. They don’t feel the need to insult friends behind their backs, participate in gossip about fellow co-workers or lash out at folks with different opinions. They are so comfortable in who they are that they feel no need to look down on other people.

7. They don’t let lack of resources stop them.

Highly confident people can make use of whatever resources they have, no matter how big or small. They know that all things are possible with creativity and a refusal to quit. They don’t agonize over setbacks, but rather focus on finding a solution.

8. They don’t make comparisons.

Highly confident people know that they are not competing with any other person. They compete with no other individual except the person they were yesterday. They know that every person is living a story so unique that drawing comparisons would be an absurd and simplistic exercise in futility.

9. They don’t find joy in people-pleasing.

Highly confident people have no interest in pleasing every person they meet. They are aware that not all people get along, and that’s just how life works. They focus on the quality of their relationships, instead of the quantity of them.

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10. They don’t need constant reassurance.

Highly confident people aren’t in need of hand-holding. They know that life isn’t fair and things won’t always go their way. While they can’t control every event in their life, they focus on their power to react in a positive way that moves them forward.

11. They don’t avoid life’s inconvenient truths.

Highly confident people confront life’s issues at the root before the disease can spread any farther. They know that problems left unaddressed have a way of multiplying as the days, weeks and months go by. They would rather have an uncomfortable conversation with their partner today than sweep an inconvenient truth under the rug, putting trust at risk.

12. They don’t quit because of minor set-backs.

Highly confident people get back up every time they fall down. They know that failure is an unavoidable part of the growth process. They are like a detective, searching for clues that reveal why this approach didn’t work. After modifying their plan, they try again (but better this time).

13. They don’t require anyone’s permission to act.

Highly confident people take action without hesitation. Every day, they remind themselves, “If not me, who?”

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14. They don’t limit themselves to a small toolbox.

Highly confident people don’t limit themselves to Plan A. They make use of any and all weapons that are at their disposal, relentlessly testing the effectiveness of every approach, until they identify the strategies that offer the most results for the least cost in time and effort.

15. They don’t blindly accept what they read on the Internet as “truth” without thinking about it.

Highly confident people don’t accept articles on the Internet as truth just because some author “said so”. They look at every how-to article from the lens of their unique perspective. They maintain a healthy skepticism, making use of any material that is relevant to their lives, and forgetting about the rest. While articles like this are a fun and interesting thought-exercise, highly confident people know that they are the only person with the power to decide what “confidence” means.

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