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24 Online Websites Set to Replace the Traditional College Education

24 Online Websites Set to Replace the Traditional College Education

It’s without question that this generation has and will see the biggest shift in education in the past century.

Top universities like Harvard, MIT, and Stanford are sharing their courses online for free, and it’s no longer necessary to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars to receive a paper degree.

With the rise of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Course), now anyone with expertise can teach to millions of people around the world looking for their specialized knowledge.

Not only is it easier to get access to quality education online, but the value of a traditional degree is worth questioning, with the rise of unemployment among recent college graduates increasing to 8.5% in 2014 from 5.5% in 2007.

Not to worry. Here are 24 websites you can use instead of taking a college course. Learn anything from languages, finance, computer science, and more.

General Subjects

1. EdX — A non-profit provider that offers online courses from the world’s best universities, including MIT, Harvard, Berkeley, and more.

2. Wikiversity — Wikiversity is a Wikimedia Foundation project devoted to learning resources, learning projects, and research for use in all levels, types, and styles of education from pre-school to university. It also includes professional training and informal learning.

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3. Lynda — Now under Linkedin, Lynda is known as one of the best online video learning resources for learning nearly any skill — from Photoshop to Video Editing. While Lynda is most famous for their premium software video tutorials, they also offer free courses online.

Computer Science and Engineering

4.  Codeacademy — A fun, simple, and gamified method of learning how to code, from HTML, CSS, Javascript, Ruby on Rails, and beyond. Great to get the basic knowledge of learning how to code

5. W3school — Great resource to find specific tutorials, answers to problems you’re struggling with, and a community of fellow coders.

6. Google Code University — Provides sample course content and tutorials for Computer Science (CS) students and educators on current computing technologies and paradigms.

Branding, Creativity & Marketing

7.  HubSpot Marketing Library — A free library of anything inbound marketing related, from ebooks to templates and more goodies for you to download.

8.  CreativeLIVE — A unique proposition: Enroll into live classes online for free, and purchase only the courses you want to keep. Learn everything from photography and design, to money and marketing.

9.  Skillshare — An online website to learn anything from anyone, Skillshare has insightful courses on branding and marketing that are taught by knowledgeable experts including Guy Kawasaki, Gary Vaynerchuk, and more.

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Foreign & Sign Language

10.  Rype — Known to language lovers as “Your Personal Language Coach,” Rype is reinventing language learning by integrating the advantages of coaching, including personalization and coaching accountability, to help you reach fluency faster. Check out their free course on How to Learn a Language in 90 Days or try out a 14-day free trial for Rype Club.

11.  Duolingo — With over 50M users around the world, Duolingo has become the mobile app for language lovers to begin their language journey.

12.  American Sign Language Browser — Teach yourself American Sign Language on the most popular sign language website online.

Economics & Finance

13.  Investopedia Financial Investing Tutorials — An abundance of detailed lessons on money management and investing.

14.  TheStreet University — Whether you’re just starting out as a stock and bond investor or you’re in need of a refresher’s course, this is the place to learn what you need to know.

15.  Fool.com — Learn everything from getting started in investing, real estate, taxes, managing your personal budget, and more — all from experts.

Science & Health

16.  MIT OpenCourseWare — A free online publication of MIT course materials, including nearly all the undergraduate and graduate subjects taught at MIT.

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17.  Harvard Medical School Open Courseware—Harvard’s online courseware exchanging knowledge from the Harvard community of scholars to other academic institutions, and the general public.

18.  Khan Academy — Over a thousand, insightful video lessons covering everything from basic arithmetic and algebra to physics, chemistry, and biology.

19.  Open Yale Courses — Open Yale Courses provide lectures and other materials from selected Yale College courses to the public, free of charge, via the internet. The courses span the full range of liberal arts disciplines, including humanities, social sciences, and physical and biological sciences.

English & Communications

20.  Open Yale Courses (English) — Open Yale Courses provides lectures and other materials from selected Yale College courses to the public free of charge via the internet.

21.  Lifewriting — A full guide of the nine-week writing class that a highly profiled professor taught in UCLA.

History & World Culture

22.  Bio’s Best — Biography.com’s most popular biographies on notable historical figures that you can learn from.

23.  MIT OpenCourseWare (History) — The MIT History Faculty offers over seventy subjects in the Undergraduate and Graduate level in the diverse areas of history

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24.  Have Fun with History — A resource for students, educators and all lovers of American History.


Will the increasing rise of MOOCs and specialized online learning websites replace the 4-year traditional degree?

It’s hard to say today. However, as the quality of education and learning experience improves through the use of technology, it will become more and more difficult for the traditional education system to compete.

The social college experience will always be a hard component to replace. If that’s a priority for you, it’s recommended you use these learning websites as a complementary resource to your traditional degree.

However, the state of the education industry is changing faster than ever, and it’s without question that online learning will continue to be a major component in the future of learning.

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Last Updated on February 15, 2019

7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

Joe’s Goals

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    Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

    Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

    Daytum

      Daytum

      is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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      Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

      Excel or Numbers

        If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

        What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

        Evernote

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          I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

          Evernote is free with a premium version available.

          Access or Bento

            If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

            Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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            You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

            Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

            All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

            Conclusion

            I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

            What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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