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Five Habits That Make You Look Unprofessional

Five Habits That Make You Look Unprofessional

Have you ever seen a coworker constantly show unprofessional behaviour and questioned about how they maintain their position in the organization?

Are you doing some self-reflection and wondering why you are able to stand out from the crowd, even you possess the appropriate education and experience?

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While there may be other contributing factors that might delay your promotion, you may be displaying certain behaviour that are keeping you from growing professionally. These five things are some of the unprofessional habits that can prevent you from achieving success:

1.Wandering Eyes

You know this routine very well; it has become second nature to the point where you barely realize yourself doing it. When you disagree with someone, your instinct kicks in and you think you are being subtle by simply reacting with your eyes. However, don’t be too comfortable with it because your supervisor might already noticed what have you been doing. They may not mention it directly, but he/she might keep a record of these signs of disengagement and might prevent you from promoting. If you are frustrated with a certain decision, the best way is to discuss it directly with whoever is involved.

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2.”It is what it is”

These saying may be common near the water cooler or during happy hour with your close buddies at work but the last thing your employer wants to hear from a promising employee is “you know how it is here”, or “that’s just how things are at XYZ”. Such statements show that you have formed unbreakable negative ideas about the organization. Instead, if you problematic decisions, do some research and discuss possible solutions with your supervisor at the appropriate time.

3.”In my opinion”

Sure, it is great to share your own opinion with your supervisor however constantly use of “in my opinion” will either make yourself sounds defensive or unwilling to be part of a team.It also signals that you are not ready for an advancement opportunity. Either way, it would be better to just say your opinion.

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4.”You guys” syndrome

There is no quicker way to label yourself as an outsider than always referring the team as “you guys”. Even if there are practices that you may disagree with or want to improve, the best way to create changes is by first taking ownership of your position within the team so you can work together to turn things around.

5.”&*#[email protected]!”

While this should be common sense, it would be surprising to realize how many professionals also believe that the common use of profanities is acceptable in a professional setting. Regardless of how unconventional your workplace might be, cursing in an office is the ultimate sign of unprofessional behaviour. While the U.S. Federal Communications Commission may now allow certain curse words on television, it still does not make it acceptable in a professional environment. Keep in mind that it’s not the curses that will drive your point across but rather your conviction and delivery of your speech.

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With more people returning to school and gaining more degrees, the job market will be more competitive, so be sure to avoid these unprofessional behaviours in order to increase your chance of advancement.

Featured photo credit: Male Fashion Winter Jacket And Grey Jeans Button Up/ Ed Gregory via stokpic.com

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Last Updated on December 16, 2018

12 Simple Ways You Can Build A Positive Attitude

12 Simple Ways You Can Build A Positive Attitude

We all look for a better and happier life, but somehow we realize it’s our attitude that makes it hard to lead the life we want. How can we build a positive attitude? Grant Mathews has listed out the things (from the easiest to the hardest) we can do to cultivate this attitude on Quora:

1. Listen to good music.

Music definitely improves your mood, and it’s a really simple thing to do.

2. Don’t watch television passively.

Studies have shown that people who watch TV less are happier, which leads me to my next point…

3. Don’t do anything passively.

Whenever I do something, I like to ask myself if, at the end of the day, I would be content saying that I had spent time doing it. (This is why I block sites I find myself wasting too much time on. I enjoy them, but they’re just not worth it when I could be learning something new, or working on projects I care about.)

Time is incredibly valuable.

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4. Be aware of negativity

A community that considers itself intelligent tends to be negativity because criticizing is seen as a signaling mechanism to indicate that you’re more intelligent than the person you corrected. This was irrationally frustrating for me – it’s one of those things you’ll stay up all night to think about.

5. Make time to be alone.

I initially said “take time just to be alone.” I changed it because if you don’t ensure you can take a break, you’ll surely be interrupted.

Being with other people is something you can do to make you happy, but I don’t include it in this list because nearly everyone finds time to talk with friends. On the other hand, spending time just with yourself is almost considered a taboo.

Take some time to figure out who you are.

6. Exercise.

This is the best way to improve your immediate happiness.

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Exercise probably makes you happy. Try and go on a run. You’ll hate yourself while doing it, but the gratification that you get towards the end vastly outweighs the frustration of the first few attempts. I can’t say enough good things about exercise.

Exercising is also fantastic because it gives you time alone.

7. Have projects.

Having a goal, and moving towards it, is a key to happiness.

You have to realize though that achieving the goal is not necessarily what makes you happy – it’s the process. When I write music, I write it because writing is inherently enjoyable, not because I want to get popular (as if!).

8. Take time to do the things you enjoy.

That’s very general, so let me give you a good example.

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One of the things that has really changed my life was finding small communities centered around activities I enjoy. For instance, I like writing music, so I’m part of a community that meets up to write a song for an hour every week. I love the community. I’ve also written a song every week, 37 weeks in a row, which has gradually moved me towards larger goals and makes me feel very satisfied.

9. Change your definition of happiness.

Another reason I think I’m more happy than other people is because my definition of happiness is a lot more relaxed than most people’s. I don’t seek for some sort of constant euphoria; I don’t think it’s possible to live like that. My happiness is closer to stability.

10. Ignore things that don’t make you happy.

I get varying reactions to this one.

The argument goes “if something is making you unhappy, then you should find out why and improve it, not ignore it.” If you can do that, great. But on the other hand, there’s no reason to mope about a bad score on a test.

There’s another counterargument: perhaps you’re moping because your brain is trying to work out how to improve. In fact, this is the key purpose of depression: Depression’s Upside – NYTimes.com

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I can think of examples that go both ways. I remember, for instance, when I was debating a year or two ago and my partner and I would lose a round, I would mull over what we had done wrong for a long time. In that way, I got immensely better at debate (and public speaking in general – did you know debate has amazing effects on your public speaking ability? But now I really digress).

On the other hand, there’s no way that mulling over how dumb you were for missing that +x term on the left hand side will make you better at math. So stop worrying about it, and go practice math instead.

11. Find a way to measure your progress, and then measure it.

Video games are addictive for a reason: filling up an experience bar and making it to the next level is immensely satisfying. I think that it would be really cool if we could apply this concept to the real world.

I put this near the bottom of the list because, unfortunately, this hasn’t been done too often in the real world – startup idea, anyone? So you would have to do it yourself, which is difficult when you don’t even know how much you’ve progressed.

For a while, I kept a log of the runs I had taken, and my average speed. It was really cool to see my improvement over the weeks. (Also, I was exercising. Combining the two was fantastic for boosting happiness.)

12. Realize that happiness is an evolutionary reward, not an objective truth.

It’s easy to see that this is correct, but this is at the bottom of the list for a reason.

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