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This Google Chrome Extension Will Boost Your Language Learning Effectively

This Google Chrome Extension Will Boost Your Language Learning Effectively

Is language learning difficult for you?

Learning new languages is hard, and it’s no surprise when you consider that the language learning industry is worth a massive $82.6 billion.

Simply put: it takes time.

Research suggests that the best way to comprehend a new language is through immersion. This study involved subjects being split into two groups: one group studied a language in a traditional classroom, setting while the other was trained using immersion.

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After five months of no exposure to the new language, both groups kept their language skills even though they had not used them at all, and both showed brain processing similar to that of a native speaker. However, the immersion group showed the full brain patterns of a native speaker.

Language immersion is fantastic, but realistically this is not an option for many of us. It’s hard to find the time and money to travel to another country or pay for one-on-one lessons. Even taking a few classes at a local community college is out of the question.

It cuts too much into our daily lives.

For the majority of us, we need an easier way to learn a new language through immersion. One that requires no physical presence, but just internet connection.

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Welcome Language Immersion, a free Google Chrome extension that aims to do precisely this – make the language immersion process as simple as opening an article on the internet.

You can select from one of sixty-four languages supported by Google Translate that you’re interested in learning, Also, you can select your level of immersion from the choices of “Novice,” “Intermediate,” and “Fluent.”

It’s an effortless process. The extension translates random words in the online material you’re reading. If you don’t understand the foreign translation, you can highlight the words to put them back in your native language.

The best part: If you hover over the translated words, then you’ll hear them pronounced by a native speaker.

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Here’s an example of how the words changed in the Lifehack article, “People With Autism Are More Creative, Research Finds”:

chrome extension screenshot

    Before you think Language Immersion will solve all your language learning problems, keep in mind that native speakers don’t translate the text; as a result, particular phrases sound strange because they’re translated literally.

    Still, language experts including Aaron Meyers of Everyday Language Learner said the extension is perfect for people who are both too busy and lazy for the standard language learning process.

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    After taking numerous Spanish classes throughout college, I forgot most of what I’ve learned over the last couple of years since graduating. And in only a couple of weeks of using this slick language tool, I’ve revived a significant amount of my Spanish speaking skills.

    Also, it’s more important than ever to learn a second language because the world is becoming more of a streamlined global marketplace. With only one in four Americans able to speak a second language, knowing two, and especially three, can give you the competitive edge in the workforce.

    If you’re looking for an easy introduction back into learning languages, then this Chrome extension is perfect. It’s even better if you’re an avid online reader because the more text you read, the more opportunity you have to improve your language skills.

    It’s time you take your first steps into learning another language or to better the language skills you already have. And Language Immersion just might be the tool to remind you that learning another language can be for everyone.

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    Last Updated on January 18, 2019

    7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

    7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

    Some people will have a rain cloud hanging over them, no matter what the weather is outside. Their negative attitude is toxic to your own moods, and you probably feel like there is little you can do about it.

    But that couldn’t be farther from the truth.

    If you want to effectively deal with negative people and be a champion of positivity, then your best route is to take definite action through some of the steps below.

    1. Limit the time you spend with them.

    First, let’s get this out of the way. You can be more positive than a cartoon sponge, but even your enthusiasm has a chance of being afflicted by the constant negativity of a friend.

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    In fact, negativity has been proven to damage your health physically, making you vulnerable to high levels of stress and even cardiac disease. There’s no reason to get hurt because of someone else’s bad mood.

    Though this may be a little tricky depending on your situation, working to spend slightly less time around negative people will keep your own spirits from slipping as well.

    2. Speak up for yourself.

    Don’t just absorb the comments that you are being bombarded with, especially if they are about you. It’s wise to be quick to listen and slow to speak, but being too quiet can give the person the impression that you are accepting what’s being said.

    3. Don’t pretend that their behavior is “OK.”

    This is an easy trap to fall into. Point out to the person that their constant negativity isn’t a good thing. We don’t want to do this because it’s far easier to let someone sit in their woes, and we’d rather just stay out of it.

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    But if you want the best for this person, avoid giving the false impression that their negativity is normal.

    4. Don’t make their problems your problems.

    Though I consider empathy a gift, it can be a dangerous thing. When we hear the complaints of a friend or family member, we typically start to take on their burdens with them.

    This is a bad habit to get into, especially if this is a person who is almost exclusively negative. These types of people are prone to embellishing and altering a story in order to gain sympathy.

    Why else would they be sharing this with you?

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    5. Change the subject.

    When you suspect that a conversation is starting to take a turn for the negative, be a champion of positivity by changing the subject. Of course, you have to do this without ignoring what the other person said.

    Acknowledge their comment, but move the conversation forward before the euphoric pleasure gained from complaining takes hold of either of you.

    6. Talk about solutions, not problems.

    Sometimes, changing the subject isn’t an option if you want to deal with negative people, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still be positive.

    I know that when someone begins dumping complaints on me, I have a hard time knowing exactly what to say. The key is to measure your responses as solution-based.

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    You can do this by asking questions like, “Well, how could this be resolved?” or, “How do you think they feel about it?”

    Use discernment to find an appropriate response that will help your friend manage their perspectives.

    7. Leave them behind.

    Sadly, there are times when we have to move on without these friends, especially if you have exhausted your best efforts toward building a positive relationship.

    If this person is a family member, you can still have a functioning relationship with them, of course, but you may still have to limit the influence they have over your wellbeing.

    That being said, what are some steps you’ve taken to deal with negative people? Let us know in the comments.

    You may also want to read: How to Stop the Negative Spin of Thoughts, Emotions and Actions.

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