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7 Reasons Why Type A People Are Great Partners

7 Reasons Why Type A People Are Great Partners

Most people don’t consider a Type A personality to be a good thing; Type A’s are reputed to be stubborn, set in their ways, dogmatic, and continually stressed out.  In fact, the dangers of overly aggressive type A traits are considered enough of a health risk that type A modification behavior has been popular for decades. But does this mean that Type A’s make terrible partners? Not at all – here are 7 reasons why a Type A person can make a great partner and you should consider yourself privileged if you have one!

They are organized.

Type A’s are organized to a fault. When you enter their closets you’ll be pleasantly surprised to find that all their clothes are not only folded, sorted, and hung up, but are likely arranged according to type of clothing, fabric and color. Their shoes may even be neatly stacked and stored in shoe boxes. Their calendars are updated and their pantries are stocked and labeled. The best part of all this is when they are your partner – you get the benefit of this organization. You may not be excited at the idea of organizing your own closet or remembering every last detail in your address book but your partner will be more than happy to help you out.

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They plan ahead.

Type A’s are planners. They conduct SWOT analyses and plan for best and worst case scenarios. Going on vacation? Type A’s will not only find and book the best airfares and top rated hotels months ahead of time, they’ll start studying the destination and put together a day by day plan so they don’t miss a thing. Type A’s are always prepared. Did your four-year-old spill milk all over his shirt for the third time when you’re out of the house? Don’t worry, your Type A partner probably has four or more spares stored in the car. When you’re with a Type A you can relax, they’ll do the planning for you. But the best you can do for a Type A is remind them to plan time to relax themselves.

They put their best into everything they do.

Type A’s tend to be perfectionists. If they take on a project or commit to something, they don’t just get the job done, they get it done exceptionally well. That means that they’ll put the best into your relationship, too. When you’re with a Type A partner, you can count on them remembering birthdays, anniversaries, and other important dates. Plus, they won’t just remember – as we said before, Type A partners plan ahead so get ready to have a wonderful, planned celebration complete with gifts.

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They are passionate.

Type A people live life with passion. They engage in things that make them excited and they pour their hearts into relationships. Type A partners will devote themselves to you and your relationship with passion, and they will take commitment seriously. They wear their hearts on their sleeves, so if something is wrong or they are starting to lose interest in the relationship, you’ll know when their passion decreases.

They won’t be overly dependent on you.

Type A’s have a lot going on. They are passionate about relationships, but they’re also passionate about everything else that they commit to. Type A people are busy bodies; they are happiest when they are over committed. So if you’ve struggled with past partners who had nothing to focus on but your relationship, you can feel comfortable that being with a Type A means you’ll have plenty of breathing room. If they are not focusing on the relationship, it’s because they are focused on one of the many other things they’ve got on their plate. They won’t depend on you to make them happy or keep them happy.

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They live their life with purpose.

Purpose is important to Type A people. While they may seem task and planning oriented, all their work and efforts usually ladder up into a greater vision. If your partner is a Type A, you can be sure that they view their life and your relationship as meaningful. You an be proud in knowing that your partner will achieve even more than the obvious.

They don’t take no for an answer.

Type A people are resilient and stubborn. If they want something, they will stop at nothing to get it. This trait applies to things that they want for their partners. As a Type A myself, when my husband and I found ourselves placed in middle seats in the middle section of an airplane for a transatlantic trip, I didn’t stop talking to and negotiating with the airline staff until the situation was remedied – and we were both seated in business class. While that situation may seem trivial, the same drive and persistence applies to many other facets of a Type A’s  life, including career, finances, and personal passions.

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Featured photo credit: Enamoured Couple is Playing / Richard Foster via flickr.com

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Last Updated on January 18, 2019

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

Some people will have a rain cloud hanging over them, no matter what the weather is outside. Their negative attitude is toxic to your own moods, and you probably feel like there is little you can do about it.

But that couldn’t be farther from the truth.

If you want to effectively deal with negative people and be a champion of positivity, then your best route is to take definite action through some of the steps below.

1. Limit the time you spend with them.

First, let’s get this out of the way. You can be more positive than a cartoon sponge, but even your enthusiasm has a chance of being afflicted by the constant negativity of a friend.

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In fact, negativity has been proven to damage your health physically, making you vulnerable to high levels of stress and even cardiac disease. There’s no reason to get hurt because of someone else’s bad mood.

Though this may be a little tricky depending on your situation, working to spend slightly less time around negative people will keep your own spirits from slipping as well.

2. Speak up for yourself.

Don’t just absorb the comments that you are being bombarded with, especially if they are about you. It’s wise to be quick to listen and slow to speak, but being too quiet can give the person the impression that you are accepting what’s being said.

3. Don’t pretend that their behavior is “OK.”

This is an easy trap to fall into. Point out to the person that their constant negativity isn’t a good thing. We don’t want to do this because it’s far easier to let someone sit in their woes, and we’d rather just stay out of it.

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But if you want the best for this person, avoid giving the false impression that their negativity is normal.

4. Don’t make their problems your problems.

Though I consider empathy a gift, it can be a dangerous thing. When we hear the complaints of a friend or family member, we typically start to take on their burdens with them.

This is a bad habit to get into, especially if this is a person who is almost exclusively negative. These types of people are prone to embellishing and altering a story in order to gain sympathy.

Why else would they be sharing this with you?

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5. Change the subject.

When you suspect that a conversation is starting to take a turn for the negative, be a champion of positivity by changing the subject. Of course, you have to do this without ignoring what the other person said.

Acknowledge their comment, but move the conversation forward before the euphoric pleasure gained from complaining takes hold of either of you.

6. Talk about solutions, not problems.

Sometimes, changing the subject isn’t an option if you want to deal with negative people, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still be positive.

I know that when someone begins dumping complaints on me, I have a hard time knowing exactly what to say. The key is to measure your responses as solution-based.

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You can do this by asking questions like, “Well, how could this be resolved?” or, “How do you think they feel about it?”

Use discernment to find an appropriate response that will help your friend manage their perspectives.

7. Leave them behind.

Sadly, there are times when we have to move on without these friends, especially if you have exhausted your best efforts toward building a positive relationship.

If this person is a family member, you can still have a functioning relationship with them, of course, but you may still have to limit the influence they have over your wellbeing.

That being said, what are some steps you’ve taken to deal with negative people? Let us know in the comments.

You may also want to read: How to Stop the Negative Spin of Thoughts, Emotions and Actions.

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