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Research Finds Something Surprising About People Who Read Fiction

Research Finds Something Surprising About People Who Read Fiction

Whether they believe it or not, every work of fiction a dedicated reader picks up to read in their free time benefits them significantly, at least in comparison to their non-reader friends.

It’s not just a tool to make them smarter or help them do better in school, though. Research has proven over and over again that reading fiction gives people both emotional and physical benefits they never even knew they had.

In case rereading a favorite book series wasn’t already at the top of this week’s to-do list, here are a few more ways that fiction readers benefit from their hobby.

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They are more aware of how others are feeling

When a reader dives into a story, they are automatically agreeing to experience the fictional events right alongside each character. Whether they realize it or not, this forces them to feel each character’s emotions as their own—what psychologists call empathy.

A 2013 study found that fiction readers’ brains are more active in areas that correspond with language and sensation, making them more aware of their surroundings. People who read fiction are much more likely to recognize and understand how a nearby classmate, friend, or family member is feeling, similar to the emotions of a character on a page.

They sleep better

When we think of an avid reader, we often picture someone hiding under a blanket long past lights-out, reading a book by flashlight. Those who read fiction do sometimes sacrifice a full night’s rest for the sake of finishing a good story, but in general, when they do sleep, they do it well.

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Reading relieves stress, and because many experts recommend establishing a stress-reducing routine before bed, ending the day with a book isn’t a bad idea. Reading both exercises and calms the brain. Those who spend large blocks of time reading before falling asleep use that time to clear their minds of the day’s stressors and slowly prepare their brains for the work to be done while their bodies rest overnight.

They may be less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease

Alzheimer’s disease is a major contributor to age-related mental decline. The less time someone spends using their brain to solve puzzles and comprehend events—things frequent fiction readers probably do on a daily basis—the more likely they are to suffer the ailments of Alzheimer’s.

Mentally stimulating activities, like reading and writing, over long periods of time have been shown to improve brain function as people age. Therefore, those who spend the majority of their lives caught up in complex, exhilarating storylines are already doing their part to keep their brains in motion as they get older.

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They are more down-to-earth

Someone who spends all his or her time reading isn’t completely lost in a different world away from the present. While it’s enjoyable to be able to take some time away from real life, they’re very well-equipped to handle life’s everyday happenings once they put the novel down.

People who read fiction are fairly kind and intelligent because of their elevated empathy and deeper understanding of people and how they behave. The stories they read teach them how to solve problems, handle conflict, and prepare for the unexpected, since they’ve watched hundreds of different characters overcome their own obstacles time and time again.

Conclusion

Looking at the big picture, people who still read fiction are probably much better off than people who tend to shy away from it.

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With an increased ability and willingness to care for others, better sleep patterns, less risk of debilitating disease, and a deeper sense of reality, fiction readers are setting themselves up to live smarter, healthier, and happier lives. This is as good an excuse as any to reread everything on their bookshelves, starting now.

Featured photo credit: Kamil Porembiński via flickr.com

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Last Updated on January 18, 2019

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

Some people will have a rain cloud hanging over them, no matter what the weather is outside. Their negative attitude is toxic to your own moods, and you probably feel like there is little you can do about it.

But that couldn’t be farther from the truth.

If you want to effectively deal with negative people and be a champion of positivity, then your best route is to take definite action through some of the steps below.

1. Limit the time you spend with them.

First, let’s get this out of the way. You can be more positive than a cartoon sponge, but even your enthusiasm has a chance of being afflicted by the constant negativity of a friend.

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In fact, negativity has been proven to damage your health physically, making you vulnerable to high levels of stress and even cardiac disease. There’s no reason to get hurt because of someone else’s bad mood.

Though this may be a little tricky depending on your situation, working to spend slightly less time around negative people will keep your own spirits from slipping as well.

2. Speak up for yourself.

Don’t just absorb the comments that you are being bombarded with, especially if they are about you. It’s wise to be quick to listen and slow to speak, but being too quiet can give the person the impression that you are accepting what’s being said.

3. Don’t pretend that their behavior is “OK.”

This is an easy trap to fall into. Point out to the person that their constant negativity isn’t a good thing. We don’t want to do this because it’s far easier to let someone sit in their woes, and we’d rather just stay out of it.

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But if you want the best for this person, avoid giving the false impression that their negativity is normal.

4. Don’t make their problems your problems.

Though I consider empathy a gift, it can be a dangerous thing. When we hear the complaints of a friend or family member, we typically start to take on their burdens with them.

This is a bad habit to get into, especially if this is a person who is almost exclusively negative. These types of people are prone to embellishing and altering a story in order to gain sympathy.

Why else would they be sharing this with you?

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5. Change the subject.

When you suspect that a conversation is starting to take a turn for the negative, be a champion of positivity by changing the subject. Of course, you have to do this without ignoring what the other person said.

Acknowledge their comment, but move the conversation forward before the euphoric pleasure gained from complaining takes hold of either of you.

6. Talk about solutions, not problems.

Sometimes, changing the subject isn’t an option if you want to deal with negative people, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still be positive.

I know that when someone begins dumping complaints on me, I have a hard time knowing exactly what to say. The key is to measure your responses as solution-based.

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You can do this by asking questions like, “Well, how could this be resolved?” or, “How do you think they feel about it?”

Use discernment to find an appropriate response that will help your friend manage their perspectives.

7. Leave them behind.

Sadly, there are times when we have to move on without these friends, especially if you have exhausted your best efforts toward building a positive relationship.

If this person is a family member, you can still have a functioning relationship with them, of course, but you may still have to limit the influence they have over your wellbeing.

That being said, what are some steps you’ve taken to deal with negative people? Let us know in the comments.

You may also want to read: How to Stop the Negative Spin of Thoughts, Emotions and Actions.

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