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Research Finds Something Surprising About People Who Read Fiction

Research Finds Something Surprising About People Who Read Fiction

Whether they believe it or not, every work of fiction a dedicated reader picks up to read in their free time benefits them significantly, at least in comparison to their non-reader friends.

It’s not just a tool to make them smarter or help them do better in school, though. Research has proven over and over again that reading fiction gives people both emotional and physical benefits they never even knew they had.

In case rereading a favorite book series wasn’t already at the top of this week’s to-do list, here are a few more ways that fiction readers benefit from their hobby.

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They are more aware of how others are feeling

When a reader dives into a story, they are automatically agreeing to experience the fictional events right alongside each character. Whether they realize it or not, this forces them to feel each character’s emotions as their own—what psychologists call empathy.

A 2013 study found that fiction readers’ brains are more active in areas that correspond with language and sensation, making them more aware of their surroundings. People who read fiction are much more likely to recognize and understand how a nearby classmate, friend, or family member is feeling, similar to the emotions of a character on a page.

They sleep better

When we think of an avid reader, we often picture someone hiding under a blanket long past lights-out, reading a book by flashlight. Those who read fiction do sometimes sacrifice a full night’s rest for the sake of finishing a good story, but in general, when they do sleep, they do it well.

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Reading relieves stress, and because many experts recommend establishing a stress-reducing routine before bed, ending the day with a book isn’t a bad idea. Reading both exercises and calms the brain. Those who spend large blocks of time reading before falling asleep use that time to clear their minds of the day’s stressors and slowly prepare their brains for the work to be done while their bodies rest overnight.

They may be less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease

Alzheimer’s disease is a major contributor to age-related mental decline. The less time someone spends using their brain to solve puzzles and comprehend events—things frequent fiction readers probably do on a daily basis—the more likely they are to suffer the ailments of Alzheimer’s.

Mentally stimulating activities, like reading and writing, over long periods of time have been shown to improve brain function as people age. Therefore, those who spend the majority of their lives caught up in complex, exhilarating storylines are already doing their part to keep their brains in motion as they get older.

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They are more down-to-earth

Someone who spends all his or her time reading isn’t completely lost in a different world away from the present. While it’s enjoyable to be able to take some time away from real life, they’re very well-equipped to handle life’s everyday happenings once they put the novel down.

People who read fiction are fairly kind and intelligent because of their elevated empathy and deeper understanding of people and how they behave. The stories they read teach them how to solve problems, handle conflict, and prepare for the unexpected, since they’ve watched hundreds of different characters overcome their own obstacles time and time again.

Conclusion

Looking at the big picture, people who still read fiction are probably much better off than people who tend to shy away from it.

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With an increased ability and willingness to care for others, better sleep patterns, less risk of debilitating disease, and a deeper sense of reality, fiction readers are setting themselves up to live smarter, healthier, and happier lives. This is as good an excuse as any to reread everything on their bookshelves, starting now.

Featured photo credit: Kamil Porembiński via flickr.com

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

If I was a super hero I’d want my super power to be the ability to motivate everyone around me. Think of how many problems you could solve just by being able to motivate people towards their goals. You wouldn’t be frustrated by lazy co-workers. You wouldn’t be mad at your partner for wasting the weekend in front of the TV. Also, the more people around you are motivated toward their dreams, the more you can capitalize off their successes.

Being able to motivate people is key to your success at work, at home, and in the future because no one can achieve anything alone. We all need the help of others.

So, how to motivate people? Here are 7 ways to motivate others even you can do.

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1. Listen

Most people start out trying to motivate someone by giving them a lengthy speech, but this rarely works because motivation has to start inside others. The best way to motivate others is to start by listening to what they want to do. Find out what the person’s goals and dreams are. If it’s something you want to encourage, then continue through these steps.

2. Ask Open-Ended Questions

Open-ended questions are the best way to figure out what someone’s dreams are. If you can’t think of anything to ask, start with, “What have you always wanted to do?”

“Why do you want to do that?”

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“What makes you so excited about it?”

“How long has that been your dream?”

You need this information the help you with the following steps.

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3. Encourage

This is the most important step, because starting a dream is scary. People are so scared they will fail or look stupid, many never try to reach their goals, so this is where you come in. You must encourage them. Say things like, “I think you will be great at that.” Better yet, say, “I think your skills in X will help you succeed.” For example if you have a friend who wants to own a pet store, say, “You are so great with animals, I think you will be excellent at running a pet store.”

4. Ask About What the First Step Will Be

After you’ve encouraged them, find how they will start. If they don’t know, you can make suggestions, but it’s better to let the person figure out the first step themselves so they can be committed to the process.

5. Dream

This is the most fun step, because you can dream about success. Say things like, “Wouldn’t it be cool if your business took off, and you didn’t have to work at that job you hate?” By allowing others to dream, you solidify the motivation in place and connect their dreams to a future reality.

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6. Ask How You Can Help

Most of the time, others won’t need anything from you, but it’s always good to offer. Just letting the person know you’re there will help motivate them to start. And, who knows, maybe your skills can help.

7. Follow Up

Periodically, over the course of the next year, ask them how their goal is going. This way you can find out what progress has been made. You may need to do the seven steps again, or they may need motivation in another area of their life.

Final Thoughts

By following these seven steps, you’ll be able to encourage the people around you to achieve their dreams and goals. In return, you’ll be more passionate about getting to your goals, you’ll be surrounded by successful people, and others will want to help you reach your dreams …

Oh, and you’ll become a motivational super hero. Time to get a cape!

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Featured photo credit: Thought Catalog via unsplash.com

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