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Research Finds Something Surprising About People Who Read Fiction

Research Finds Something Surprising About People Who Read Fiction

Whether they believe it or not, every work of fiction a dedicated reader picks up to read in their free time benefits them significantly, at least in comparison to their non-reader friends.

It’s not just a tool to make them smarter or help them do better in school, though. Research has proven over and over again that reading fiction gives people both emotional and physical benefits they never even knew they had.

In case rereading a favorite book series wasn’t already at the top of this week’s to-do list, here are a few more ways that fiction readers benefit from their hobby.

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They are more aware of how others are feeling

When a reader dives into a story, they are automatically agreeing to experience the fictional events right alongside each character. Whether they realize it or not, this forces them to feel each character’s emotions as their own—what psychologists call empathy.

A 2013 study found that fiction readers’ brains are more active in areas that correspond with language and sensation, making them more aware of their surroundings. People who read fiction are much more likely to recognize and understand how a nearby classmate, friend, or family member is feeling, similar to the emotions of a character on a page.

They sleep better

When we think of an avid reader, we often picture someone hiding under a blanket long past lights-out, reading a book by flashlight. Those who read fiction do sometimes sacrifice a full night’s rest for the sake of finishing a good story, but in general, when they do sleep, they do it well.

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Reading relieves stress, and because many experts recommend establishing a stress-reducing routine before bed, ending the day with a book isn’t a bad idea. Reading both exercises and calms the brain. Those who spend large blocks of time reading before falling asleep use that time to clear their minds of the day’s stressors and slowly prepare their brains for the work to be done while their bodies rest overnight.

They may be less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease

Alzheimer’s disease is a major contributor to age-related mental decline. The less time someone spends using their brain to solve puzzles and comprehend events—things frequent fiction readers probably do on a daily basis—the more likely they are to suffer the ailments of Alzheimer’s.

Mentally stimulating activities, like reading and writing, over long periods of time have been shown to improve brain function as people age. Therefore, those who spend the majority of their lives caught up in complex, exhilarating storylines are already doing their part to keep their brains in motion as they get older.

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They are more down-to-earth

Someone who spends all his or her time reading isn’t completely lost in a different world away from the present. While it’s enjoyable to be able to take some time away from real life, they’re very well-equipped to handle life’s everyday happenings once they put the novel down.

People who read fiction are fairly kind and intelligent because of their elevated empathy and deeper understanding of people and how they behave. The stories they read teach them how to solve problems, handle conflict, and prepare for the unexpected, since they’ve watched hundreds of different characters overcome their own obstacles time and time again.

Conclusion

Looking at the big picture, people who still read fiction are probably much better off than people who tend to shy away from it.

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With an increased ability and willingness to care for others, better sleep patterns, less risk of debilitating disease, and a deeper sense of reality, fiction readers are setting themselves up to live smarter, healthier, and happier lives. This is as good an excuse as any to reread everything on their bookshelves, starting now.

Featured photo credit: Kamil Porembiński via flickr.com

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Last Updated on June 26, 2020

10 Things To Remember When Everything Goes Wrong

10 Things To Remember When Everything Goes Wrong

Problems and heartaches in life are inevitable. However, there are some things to remember when you’re right in the thick of it that can help you get through it. When everything seems to be going wrong, practice telling yourself these things.

1. This Too Shall Pass

Sometimes life’s rough patches feel like they’re going to last forever. Whether you’re dealing with work-related issues, family problems, or stressful situations, very few problems last for a lifetime. So remind yourself, that things won’t be this bad forever.

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2. Some Things are Going Right

When things are going wrong, it’s hard to recognize what is going right. It’s easy to screen out the good things and only focus on the bad things. Remind yourself that some things are going right. Purposely look for the positive, even if it is something very small.

3. I Have Some Control

One of the most most important things to remember is that you have some control of the situation. Even if you aren’t in complete control of the situation, one thing you can always control is your attitude and reaction. Focus on managing what is within your control.

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4. I Can Ask for Help

Asking for help can be hard sometimes. However, it’s one of the best ways to deal with tough situations. Tell people what you need specifically if they offer to help. Don’t be afraid to call on friends and family and ask them for help, whether you need financial assistance, emotional support, or practical help.

5. Much of This Won’t Matter in a Few Years

Most of the problems we worry about today won’t actually matter five years from now. Remind yourself that whatever is going wrong now is only a small percentage of your actual life. Even if you’re dealing with a major problem, like a loved one’s illness, remember that a lot of good things are likely to happen in the course of a year or two as well.

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6. I Can Handle This

A lack of confidence in handling tough times can add to stress. One of the best things to remember is that you can handle tough situations. Even though you might feel angry, hurt, disappointed, or sad, it won’t kill you. You can get through it.

7. Something Good Will Come Out of This

No matter how bad a situation is, it’s almost certain that something good will come out of it. At the very least, it’s likely that you will learn a life lesson. Perhaps you learn not to repeat the same mistake in the future or maybe you move on from a bad situation and find something better. Look for the one good thing that can result when bad things happen.

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8. I Can Accept What’s Out of my Control

There are many things that aren’t within your control. You can’t change the past, another person’s behavior, or a loved one’s health issues. Don’t waste time trying to force others to change or trying to make things be different if it isn’t within your control. Investing time and energy into trying to things you can’t will cause you to feel helpless and exhausted. Acceptance is one of the best way to establish resilience.

9. I Have Overcome Past Difficulties

One of the things to remember when you’re facing difficulties, is that you’ve handled problems in the past. Don’t overlook past difficulties that you’ve dealt with successfully. Remind yourself of all the past problems you’ve overcome and you’ll gain confidence in dealing with the current issues.

10. I Need to Take Care of Myself

When everything seems to be going wrong, take care of yourself. Get plenty of rest, get some exercise, eat healthy, and spend some time doing leisure activities. When you’re taking better care of yourself you’ll be better equipped to deal with your problems.

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Featured photo credit: NeONBRAND via unsplash.com

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