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The 6 Best Camping Places In The US That You Shouldn’t Miss

The 6 Best Camping Places In The US That You Shouldn’t Miss

For nearly 100 years, the National Park Service has been connecting us with nature. From sea to shining sea our national parks represent all the natural splendor and rich heritage of America. One of the best ways to experience these beautiful landscapes is to spend some time exploring all their crevices. Without the distractions of technology and work, you and your family can escape the mundane every day and see some truly unique scenery. The following list describes 6 of the best camping places our nation has to offer.

Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Yellowstone National Park

    (Photo Credit: Flickr)

    No guide for camping in a national park would be complete without mentioning this iconic location. As the first national park, Yellowstone National Park offers gorgeous natural settings. Bison and elk graze the majestic plains as in the days of covered wagons. Guests can take advantage of the historic setting with horseback rides through the back country. The park offers 12 campgrounds; five available for reservation and seven on a first-come-first-serve basis. With over 2,000 sites, prices range from $15-$27 a night. Year round options are available for RV, primitive and established sites.

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    Acadia National Park, Maine

    Acadia National Park, Maine

      (Photo Credit: Flickr)

      If the smell of sea salt and chance encounters with marine life excite you, then this is the park for you. Located on the scenic shores of the northeast, this park offers excellent exploration of tide pools. These small pools created by receding tides each day provide an exceptional opportunity to interact with starfish and sea urchins. Not to mention the occasional whale sighting off shore. The Seawall campground offers sea-side camping between the months of May and September. While primitive camping is available year round at Blackwoods campground sites. Pricing at Blackwoods varies depending on the time of year — $10 a night from April to November and $30 a night between May and October. Prices at Seawall range from $22 to $30.

      Olympic National Park, Washington

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      Olympic Park, Washington

        (Photo Credit: Flickr)

        This gem of the northwest offers a chance to camp in three different ecosystems, including a rain-forest. After a relaxing night under the stars, guests are welcome to explore the world’s largest Sitka Spruce tree. If the sea draws you in, then be sure to check out the state’s most northern beach. La Push beach has been one of the best places for whale spotting during migration season. The average cost of staying in one of the park’s 16 campgrounds is $20 a night. Offered on a first-come-first-serve basis, these sites have a variety of primitive, walk-in, hike-in, drive-in and RV accessible spots. Although most sites are closed in the winter months, primitive camping is open year round.

        Arches National Park, Utah

        Arches National Park, Utah

          (Photo Credit: Flickr)

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          Whether you enjoy the sun or have an affection for road runner cartoons, this park is a delight. Home to over 2,000 natural red stone arches, this park could double for a Looney Tunes backdrop. Devil’s garden is the sole campground in this park and is open all year. However, reservations are recommended for the most popular months of April to October. Prices range from $20 to $25 a night and include RV spaces. There are also sites for large groups of up to 50 that are priced at $3 a person, per night.

          Pisgah National Forest, North Carolina

          Pisgah National Forest, North Carolina

            (Photo Credit: Flickr)

            This forest haven is a must for hiking enthusiasts. It offers a wide range of trails and even connects to the famous Appalachian Trail. While on the trail be sure to take in one of the numerous waterfalls. The nearby area was given the name “land of waterfalls” because of these pristine towers of water. There are 11 established camping grounds in the forest. Most site are closed in the winter months; however, there are several that remain open year round. There are also a number of dispersed sites located near the majestic Blue Ridge Parkway.

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            Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska

            Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska

              (Photo Credit: Flickr)

              The name of this park says it all. Glacier Bay is a true national treasure, one of the last true frontiers left. This park really defines the idea of roughing it. The lack of established trails provides the perfect chance to break out your paddle and hit one of the park’s two rivers. Once you reach shore at Bartlett Cove, the park’s only campground, your real adventure begins. Bartlett is a primitive camping area available completely free of charge to guests. However an orientation session is required for your stay. Or if you desire the “call of the wilderness,” you can strike out by kayak for backcountry camping.

              Like America, these parks are diverse and wonderful. Anyone one of them would be a great place for a camping adventure.

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              Paisley Hansen

              Freelance Writer

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              Last Updated on March 13, 2019

              How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

              How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

              Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

              You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

              Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

              1. Work on the small tasks.

              When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

              Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

              2. Take a break from your work desk.

              Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

              Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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              3. Upgrade yourself

              Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

              The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

              4. Talk to a friend.

              Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

              Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

              5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

              If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

              Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

              Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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              6. Paint a vision to work towards.

              If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

              Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

              Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

              7. Read a book (or blog).

              The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

              Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

              Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

              8. Have a quick nap.

              If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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              9. Remember why you are doing this.

              Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

              What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

              10. Find some competition.

              Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

              Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

              11. Go exercise.

              Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

              Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

              As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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              Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

              12. Take a good break.

              Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

              Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

              Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

              Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

              More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

              Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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