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The 6 Best Camping Places In The US That You Shouldn’t Miss

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The 6 Best Camping Places In The US That You Shouldn’t Miss

For nearly 100 years, the National Park Service has been connecting us with nature. From sea to shining sea our national parks represent all the natural splendor and rich heritage of America. One of the best ways to experience these beautiful landscapes is to spend some time exploring all their crevices. Without the distractions of technology and work, you and your family can escape the mundane every day and see some truly unique scenery. The following list describes 6 of the best camping places our nation has to offer.

Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Yellowstone National Park

    (Photo Credit: Flickr)

    No guide for camping in a national park would be complete without mentioning this iconic location. As the first national park, Yellowstone National Park offers gorgeous natural settings. Bison and elk graze the majestic plains as in the days of covered wagons. Guests can take advantage of the historic setting with horseback rides through the back country. The park offers 12 campgrounds; five available for reservation and seven on a first-come-first-serve basis. With over 2,000 sites, prices range from $15-$27 a night. Year round options are available for RV, primitive and established sites.

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    Acadia National Park, Maine

    Acadia National Park, Maine

      (Photo Credit: Flickr)

      If the smell of sea salt and chance encounters with marine life excite you, then this is the park for you. Located on the scenic shores of the northeast, this park offers excellent exploration of tide pools. These small pools created by receding tides each day provide an exceptional opportunity to interact with starfish and sea urchins. Not to mention the occasional whale sighting off shore. The Seawall campground offers sea-side camping between the months of May and September. While primitive camping is available year round at Blackwoods campground sites. Pricing at Blackwoods varies depending on the time of year — $10 a night from April to November and $30 a night between May and October. Prices at Seawall range from $22 to $30.

      Olympic National Park, Washington

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      Olympic Park, Washington

        (Photo Credit: Flickr)

        This gem of the northwest offers a chance to camp in three different ecosystems, including a rain-forest. After a relaxing night under the stars, guests are welcome to explore the world’s largest Sitka Spruce tree. If the sea draws you in, then be sure to check out the state’s most northern beach. La Push beach has been one of the best places for whale spotting during migration season. The average cost of staying in one of the park’s 16 campgrounds is $20 a night. Offered on a first-come-first-serve basis, these sites have a variety of primitive, walk-in, hike-in, drive-in and RV accessible spots. Although most sites are closed in the winter months, primitive camping is open year round.

        Arches National Park, Utah

        Arches National Park, Utah

          (Photo Credit: Flickr)

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          Whether you enjoy the sun or have an affection for road runner cartoons, this park is a delight. Home to over 2,000 natural red stone arches, this park could double for a Looney Tunes backdrop. Devil’s garden is the sole campground in this park and is open all year. However, reservations are recommended for the most popular months of April to October. Prices range from $20 to $25 a night and include RV spaces. There are also sites for large groups of up to 50 that are priced at $3 a person, per night.

          Pisgah National Forest, North Carolina

          Pisgah National Forest, North Carolina

            (Photo Credit: Flickr)

            This forest haven is a must for hiking enthusiasts. It offers a wide range of trails and even connects to the famous Appalachian Trail. While on the trail be sure to take in one of the numerous waterfalls. The nearby area was given the name “land of waterfalls” because of these pristine towers of water. There are 11 established camping grounds in the forest. Most site are closed in the winter months; however, there are several that remain open year round. There are also a number of dispersed sites located near the majestic Blue Ridge Parkway.

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            Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska

            Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska

              (Photo Credit: Flickr)

              The name of this park says it all. Glacier Bay is a true national treasure, one of the last true frontiers left. This park really defines the idea of roughing it. The lack of established trails provides the perfect chance to break out your paddle and hit one of the park’s two rivers. Once you reach shore at Bartlett Cove, the park’s only campground, your real adventure begins. Bartlett is a primitive camping area available completely free of charge to guests. However an orientation session is required for your stay. Or if you desire the “call of the wilderness,” you can strike out by kayak for backcountry camping.

              Like America, these parks are diverse and wonderful. Anyone one of them would be a great place for a camping adventure.

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              Paisley Hansen

              Freelance Writer

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              Last Updated on January 13, 2022

              10 Cheap And Amazing Honeymoon Ideas

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              10 Cheap And Amazing Honeymoon Ideas

              A honeymoon is important.  The wedding is over.  The months, or even years, of stress and planning are finally over.  It’s time for the two of you to relax, settle in, and start enjoying your time together as you embark on your first journey as a family.

              To make the most of this time for the least amount of money, it’s important to focus on what you want out of a honeymoon.  This isn’t your typical list of touristy honeymoon locations everyone goes to.  Rather, it’s a list of cheap honeymoon experiences a couple can enjoy together, regardless of where it’s at.

              1. Camping

              A week long camping trip is a fantastic way to see how you mesh together as a couple.  You’re put in a low impact “survival” situation where it’s just the 2 of you and nature.  You have a chance to see how your new spouse handles themselves when left with the basics of life.  There are amazing national parks all over the United States where you can camp for a week for $20-30, disconnect from technology, and enjoy some of the natural wonders our nation has to offer.

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              2. Staycation

              You don’t have to go anywhere for a honeymoon.  In fact, the tradition of taking a honeymoon vacation is a relatively new one.  Prior to the 19th century, a honeymoon involved staying home together for a month to get to know each other physically.  Think of how blissful it could be to take a full month off work, disconnect from the outside world, and focus entirely on projects together.  You may not be wowing your friends and family with pictures of some exotic location, but they’ll be envious of your escape from the rat race nonetheless.

              3. Island Getaway

              People tend to overspend on their honeymoon vacations to Hawaii, Tahiti, etc.  Going to these places doesn’t have to be expensive.  You don’t need to stay in a 5 star resort when you’re on a Best Western budget.  You’re there to be in the atmosphere of the island, not a hotel room. Book a cheap flight and sleep in a hotel alternative, on the beach or in your car.  It’s the view in paradise that really matters.

              4. Fancy Resort

              Book an expensive resort, spa, or retreat in the city you live in.  While this may seem counterintuitive as a cheap destination, when you consider your savings on airfare and other travel costs, you can afford to be treated like royalty within your own city limits.  If you book a honeymoon package, you’ll end up with a lot of free amenities and extra attention.  There’s no need to fly halfway across the world to live the good life.

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              5. Road Trip

              The journey is often more fulfilling than the actual destination.  If you fly out to some exotic locale, you’ll be stuck on a plane for 8-30 hours.  Rent a luxury car, pick a handful of places you each have always wanted to visit, and go on an adventure.  You can keep food costs down by packing your own snacks, but it’s always a good idea to sample the local delicacies wherever you go, even if it’s only a few states over.

              6. Charter a Boat

              If the ocean is your thing, a week-long cruise can cost you $1500-$3000 per person, depending on the destination.  You also have to factor in travel costs to and from the cruise, alcohol, souvenirs, and on-shore excursions.  You’ll also be surrounded by people.  For the same price (and often much cheaper), you can charter your own boat and enjoy the experience in private.

              7. Las Vegas/Atlantic City

              If gambling is your thing, these are the places to do it.  Which one you choose depends on your preference, budget, and proximity.  The way to make this vacation cheaper is to gamble smart.  Stay away from low odd tables (i.e craps, roulette) and read up on the MIT blackjack strategies to beat the house.  If you do it right, you can win enough for a free trip (and gain a valuable team skill in the process).

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              8. Themed Retreats

              There are weeklong retreats all over the world where you can fully immerse yourselves as a couple into a hobby you’re both passionate about.  Go on a yoga/meditation retreat, a ranch, a vineyard/farm, a backpacking adventure, treasure hunt, or whatever you’re into.

              9. Working Honeymoon

              Your honeymoon doesn’t have to be a vacation.  For a truly memorable experience, dedicate a week to a charity or volunteer organization.  You can drive out to a campground to help restore it in the offseason.  Maybe you’ve always wanted to volunteer to help out your local animal shelter, plant trees, help the homeless, etc.  Use the time to do something together as a couple that will fulfill you spiritually while contributing to the community.  Just because you’re on a honeymoon doesn’t mean you can’t be productive.

              10. Festivals, Fairs & Special Events

              Every city, state, and country has festivals, fairs, and special events.  Find one you’re interested in.  If you time your wedding right, your honeymoon can be a trip to one of these festivals.  Burning Man, SXSW, Bonnaroo, the Renaissance Fair, regional harvest festivals, Mardi Gras, New Years Eve in Times Square, a movie premiere, or whatever you’re into.  If you plan your honeymoon at the right time in the right place, the possibilities are endless.

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              Featured photo credit: Josue Michel via unsplash.com

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