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The 6 Best Camping Places In The US That You Shouldn’t Miss

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The 6 Best Camping Places In The US That You Shouldn’t Miss

For nearly 100 years, the National Park Service has been connecting us with nature. From sea to shining sea our national parks represent all the natural splendor and rich heritage of America. One of the best ways to experience these beautiful landscapes is to spend some time exploring all their crevices. Without the distractions of technology and work, you and your family can escape the mundane every day and see some truly unique scenery. The following list describes 6 of the best camping places our nation has to offer.

Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Yellowstone National Park

    (Photo Credit: Flickr)

    No guide for camping in a national park would be complete without mentioning this iconic location. As the first national park, Yellowstone National Park offers gorgeous natural settings. Bison and elk graze the majestic plains as in the days of covered wagons. Guests can take advantage of the historic setting with horseback rides through the back country. The park offers 12 campgrounds; five available for reservation and seven on a first-come-first-serve basis. With over 2,000 sites, prices range from $15-$27 a night. Year round options are available for RV, primitive and established sites.

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    Acadia National Park, Maine

    Acadia National Park, Maine

      (Photo Credit: Flickr)

      If the smell of sea salt and chance encounters with marine life excite you, then this is the park for you. Located on the scenic shores of the northeast, this park offers excellent exploration of tide pools. These small pools created by receding tides each day provide an exceptional opportunity to interact with starfish and sea urchins. Not to mention the occasional whale sighting off shore. The Seawall campground offers sea-side camping between the months of May and September. While primitive camping is available year round at Blackwoods campground sites. Pricing at Blackwoods varies depending on the time of year — $10 a night from April to November and $30 a night between May and October. Prices at Seawall range from $22 to $30.

      Olympic National Park, Washington

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      Olympic Park, Washington

        (Photo Credit: Flickr)

        This gem of the northwest offers a chance to camp in three different ecosystems, including a rain-forest. After a relaxing night under the stars, guests are welcome to explore the world’s largest Sitka Spruce tree. If the sea draws you in, then be sure to check out the state’s most northern beach. La Push beach has been one of the best places for whale spotting during migration season. The average cost of staying in one of the park’s 16 campgrounds is $20 a night. Offered on a first-come-first-serve basis, these sites have a variety of primitive, walk-in, hike-in, drive-in and RV accessible spots. Although most sites are closed in the winter months, primitive camping is open year round.

        Arches National Park, Utah

        Arches National Park, Utah

          (Photo Credit: Flickr)

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          Whether you enjoy the sun or have an affection for road runner cartoons, this park is a delight. Home to over 2,000 natural red stone arches, this park could double for a Looney Tunes backdrop. Devil’s garden is the sole campground in this park and is open all year. However, reservations are recommended for the most popular months of April to October. Prices range from $20 to $25 a night and include RV spaces. There are also sites for large groups of up to 50 that are priced at $3 a person, per night.

          Pisgah National Forest, North Carolina

          Pisgah National Forest, North Carolina

            (Photo Credit: Flickr)

            This forest haven is a must for hiking enthusiasts. It offers a wide range of trails and even connects to the famous Appalachian Trail. While on the trail be sure to take in one of the numerous waterfalls. The nearby area was given the name “land of waterfalls” because of these pristine towers of water. There are 11 established camping grounds in the forest. Most site are closed in the winter months; however, there are several that remain open year round. There are also a number of dispersed sites located near the majestic Blue Ridge Parkway.

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            Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska

            Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska

              (Photo Credit: Flickr)

              The name of this park says it all. Glacier Bay is a true national treasure, one of the last true frontiers left. This park really defines the idea of roughing it. The lack of established trails provides the perfect chance to break out your paddle and hit one of the park’s two rivers. Once you reach shore at Bartlett Cove, the park’s only campground, your real adventure begins. Bartlett is a primitive camping area available completely free of charge to guests. However an orientation session is required for your stay. Or if you desire the “call of the wilderness,” you can strike out by kayak for backcountry camping.

              Like America, these parks are diverse and wonderful. Anyone one of them would be a great place for a camping adventure.

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              Paisley Hansen

              Freelance Writer

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              Last Updated on August 12, 2021

              Learn How To Make Coffee 38 Different Ways With This Stunning Guide

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              If you make your own coffee in the morning, chances are you’re only making the same boring kind everyday. Now it’s time to put an end to the cynical habit and turn you into an instant coffee connoisseur.

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