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Your Working Desk Reveals What Kind Of Genius You Are

Your Working Desk Reveals What Kind Of Genius You Are

You could be spending the equivalent of 5 years just sitting at your work desk without getting up. That could be unhealthy . . . or it could be a sign of genius. Every working genius needs their own personal space in which to create — whether it be computer programs, great literature, elegant mathematical equations or solving a baffling murder case. Your own sphere of genius may not be as large as mathematician Albert Einstein’s or fictional detective Nero Wolfe’s, but it is just as important to you and those whose world you impact.

So what kind of clues to your genius does your desk display?

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Creative confusion

Lawrence F. Gray, the author of A Modern Approach to Probability Theory, says, “A desk cluttered with books and paper, pens and pencils, like mine, usually indicates a penchant for creative work over the urge to remain tidy. Cleanliness may be next to godliness, but the dance of ideas is next to impossible without some wholesome clutter!” Professor Gray’s role model in the cluttered desk league is Albert Einstein. A wit once remarked about Einstein’s working space that, “His desk is so crowded there’s not even room for dust!”

A place for everything and everything in its place

Marie Curie is your role model. Her working desk was straightforward and minimalist. It had a notepad, pen holder, small clock, blotter, French dictionary, and a water carafe and glass. Nothing more, nothing less. If your desktop is completely functional, that’s not necessarily a sign of repression — it could be a sign of focus at the genius level!

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Checkers, anyone?

Adam Farra, CEO of HostGator, is a big fan of Mark Twain. Farra explains, “Twain’s workspace was a wonderland of the latest games and distractions. Whenever he’d finish a page or two of writing, he’d kick back for a game of Parcheesi or some table tennis. He kept a pool table in his bedroom in his old age, because he did most of his writing in bed and in between bouts of scribbling, he’d get up and shoot some pool. I try to make my desk area as relaxing and interesting as Mark Twain did.” Board games also show that your genius works best with the companionship of others around you.

An orgy of organization

You have a file and number for each item on your desk. It cannot get lost or misplaced. In other words, you are in complete control of your work environment. Like Thomas Edison, you have examined, defined, and categorized everything around you. Edison’s desk was a marvel of precision. You can still see it, exactly as he left it, at Thomas Edison National Park in New Jersey.

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Control Central

Like Nikola Tesla, the electrical genius who first demonstrated the Alternating Current for utility companies, your desk has the latest technology on it, in it, and around it. Laptops, smartphones, tablets — and you’ve got an Apple Watch on your wrist. Plasma screens going 24/7, just like on NCIS. If it’s new technology, you have it on your desk or have it on back order.

Mary, Mary, quite contrary

The old nursery rhyme runs: Mary, Mary, quite contrary/how does your garden grow/with silver bells and cockle shells/and pretty maids all in a row. Writer Virginia Woolf kept that ancient verse framed above her desk and always kept a vase of fresh flowers nearby; she also positioned her writing desk next to a window overlooking her garden. Perhaps your genius needs a little bit of the garden in order to flower properly.

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Home alone

One in five Americans now work from home. And the numbers are rising. So maybe your particular genius needs the comforts of home, having your desk in a cozy little nook where you can work in your pj’s. There’s no record of noted naturalist Charles Darwin ever working in his nightshirt, but it is a matter of record that he did all his best work at his desk at home.

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via pixabay.com

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Last Updated on January 18, 2019

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

Some people will have a rain cloud hanging over them, no matter what the weather is outside. Their negative attitude is toxic to your own moods, and you probably feel like there is little you can do about it.

But that couldn’t be farther from the truth.

If you want to effectively deal with negative people and be a champion of positivity, then your best route is to take definite action through some of the steps below.

1. Limit the time you spend with them.

First, let’s get this out of the way. You can be more positive than a cartoon sponge, but even your enthusiasm has a chance of being afflicted by the constant negativity of a friend.

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In fact, negativity has been proven to damage your health physically, making you vulnerable to high levels of stress and even cardiac disease. There’s no reason to get hurt because of someone else’s bad mood.

Though this may be a little tricky depending on your situation, working to spend slightly less time around negative people will keep your own spirits from slipping as well.

2. Speak up for yourself.

Don’t just absorb the comments that you are being bombarded with, especially if they are about you. It’s wise to be quick to listen and slow to speak, but being too quiet can give the person the impression that you are accepting what’s being said.

3. Don’t pretend that their behavior is “OK.”

This is an easy trap to fall into. Point out to the person that their constant negativity isn’t a good thing. We don’t want to do this because it’s far easier to let someone sit in their woes, and we’d rather just stay out of it.

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But if you want the best for this person, avoid giving the false impression that their negativity is normal.

4. Don’t make their problems your problems.

Though I consider empathy a gift, it can be a dangerous thing. When we hear the complaints of a friend or family member, we typically start to take on their burdens with them.

This is a bad habit to get into, especially if this is a person who is almost exclusively negative. These types of people are prone to embellishing and altering a story in order to gain sympathy.

Why else would they be sharing this with you?

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5. Change the subject.

When you suspect that a conversation is starting to take a turn for the negative, be a champion of positivity by changing the subject. Of course, you have to do this without ignoring what the other person said.

Acknowledge their comment, but move the conversation forward before the euphoric pleasure gained from complaining takes hold of either of you.

6. Talk about solutions, not problems.

Sometimes, changing the subject isn’t an option if you want to deal with negative people, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still be positive.

I know that when someone begins dumping complaints on me, I have a hard time knowing exactly what to say. The key is to measure your responses as solution-based.

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You can do this by asking questions like, “Well, how could this be resolved?” or, “How do you think they feel about it?”

Use discernment to find an appropriate response that will help your friend manage their perspectives.

7. Leave them behind.

Sadly, there are times when we have to move on without these friends, especially if you have exhausted your best efforts toward building a positive relationship.

If this person is a family member, you can still have a functioning relationship with them, of course, but you may still have to limit the influence they have over your wellbeing.

That being said, what are some steps you’ve taken to deal with negative people? Let us know in the comments.

You may also want to read: How to Stop the Negative Spin of Thoughts, Emotions and Actions.

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