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The 10 Best Sources Of Free, Beautiful Images

The 10 Best Sources Of Free, Beautiful Images

If you are a business owner, software designer, app developer or any person who needs free stock images, then you probably have often got headaches finding good image sources. You google different options, and either you end up not finding a satisfactory one or you find sources that charge you.

There are thousands of sites that provide you high quality stock images free of cost. But not many have varieties of good images that you can select from. So with some research, I’ve tried to shortlist ten such sites which can help you find the image you are looking for.

Most of the images in these sites are offered under Creative Commons Zero License. In this licensing scheme, the person associated with the image dedicates his work to the public domain and transfers all of his rights to the world. This allows you to use their images multiple times for personal and commercial use without giving any credit to the owner of the image. You can even modify, edit or copy them.

1. Gratisography

Gratisography is my personal favorite image archive. It provides you more artistic images than you can use in your projects. Many quality images are added each week and are free of copyright restrictions.

Mainly two photographers (Ryan McGuire and Bells Design) are involved in capturing the images. They have offered the pictures under Creative Commons Zero license, which means you can freely use all the pictures of their collection without providing any attribution.

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2. Unsplash

Unsplash is another source of magnificent images to use for your blog. It adds 10 new images every 10 days, and also delivers them directly to your inbox. The images in this site are captured by artists from different backgrounds, so the site contains a variety of photographs.

All the images this source provides fall under Creative Commons Zero license. Once you download the image, you can use it for any purpose from setting up your blog to printing brochures, without worrying about who to credit.

3. Superfamous

Superfamous was designed by Folkert Gorter. You can use varieties of images from different categories such as nature, technology, and abstract. Most of the images in this collection are taken from aerial view.

This source provides images under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license, which means you can use them in any way you like but you have to give the credit.

This site also contains links to other sites such as Cargocollective, which provides a collection of selected images from selected artists.

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4. Pexels

Pexels contains thousands of images and adds 10 new images each day. All the images in this site falls on the Creative Commons Zero license which allows unrestricted use of high quality images from its collection for personal and even for commercial use. You can even modify, copy and distribute the images.

In this source, most people search images under categories like summer, business, abstract and art. It guarantees to add 3600 new images each year, which makes it to be one of the biggest stock image sites.

5. Pixabay

Pixabay has a large collection of stunning images. With over 450,000 free photos, vectors, and arts illustrations, it offers you royalty free stock photos which you can use for commercial application. You don’t need to provide any attribution in digital or printed form to use Pixabay images.

This site also has the option of browsing by category. You can browse images from different categories like animals, education, backgrounds/textures, nature/landscapes, and many more.

6. Flickr

Flickr is the biggest image hosting web platform, which provides you 1,000 GB of free storage. Flickr also has a collection of millions of free stock images. It has always been a reliable source of high quality free images.

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Flickr has eight different license categories. Some are royalty free and some need credits. If you don’t want to give credit to the creator, then you can use images from ‘Free Use Photos’ section.

7. Stocksnap

Stocksnap selects the highest quality, highest resolution pictures and adds to its database regularly. Users consider it to be one of the best place on internet to find beautiful free stock photos.

All the images stored in this site fall under Creative Commons Zero license and hence do not require attribution. It collects best stock photos from the web and also uploads images from selected photographers. The motto of the site is to create a community of great photographers who want to share their art with the world.

8. Picography

Picography is the simplest site in this list. It has no options to search or browse by category. You can simply scroll down through the gallery. It offers you random photos from great photographers. It adds new photos to its gallery on a regular basis.

All the images are provided free of charge and under the Creative Commons Public Domain CC0 license. But it doesn’t allow you to advertise the photographs as your own.

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9. FreeImages

If you’re involved in web projects, then the best place to find free stock images is Freeimages. It has search options and lets you browse by category. These options can save you incredible time when you’re working. Most of the images in this site are of textures and backgrounds.

Three different forms of right are granted by the site: perpetual, non-exclusive and unlimited. You can use any image to copy, reproduce, modify, edit, display and publish in your work.

10. Picjumbo

Picjumbo is the latest free stock image site. It offers you high quality free images as well as a premium membership option. New images are added on a daily basis. So, you can check this site regularly to find images you may like. You can use a Picjumbo image for commericial use, HTML/PSD/PowerPoint templates and also print them on T-shirts.

The main drawback of this site is that it is an ad-funded site, so the ads may distract you.

Featured photo credit: Great Ararat via upload.wikimedia.org

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Nabin Paudyal

Co-Founder, Siplikan Media Group

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Last Updated on February 15, 2019

7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

Joe’s Goals

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    Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

    Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

    Daytum

      Daytum

      is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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      Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

      Excel or Numbers

        If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

        What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

        Evernote

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          I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

          Evernote is free with a premium version available.

          Access or Bento

            If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

            Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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            You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

            Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

            All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

            Conclusion

            I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

            What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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