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The 10 Best Sources Of Free, Beautiful Images

The 10 Best Sources Of Free, Beautiful Images

If you are a business owner, software designer, app developer or any person who needs free stock images, then you probably have often got headaches finding good image sources. You google different options, and either you end up not finding a satisfactory one or you find sources that charge you.

There are thousands of sites that provide you high quality stock images free of cost. But not many have varieties of good images that you can select from. So with some research, I’ve tried to shortlist ten such sites which can help you find the image you are looking for.

Most of the images in these sites are offered under Creative Commons Zero License. In this licensing scheme, the person associated with the image dedicates his work to the public domain and transfers all of his rights to the world. This allows you to use their images multiple times for personal and commercial use without giving any credit to the owner of the image. You can even modify, edit or copy them.

1. Gratisography

Gratisography is my personal favorite image archive. It provides you more artistic images than you can use in your projects. Many quality images are added each week and are free of copyright restrictions.

Mainly two photographers (Ryan McGuire and Bells Design) are involved in capturing the images. They have offered the pictures under Creative Commons Zero license, which means you can freely use all the pictures of their collection without providing any attribution.

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2. Unsplash

Unsplash is another source of magnificent images to use for your blog. It adds 10 new images every 10 days, and also delivers them directly to your inbox. The images in this site are captured by artists from different backgrounds, so the site contains a variety of photographs.

All the images this source provides fall under Creative Commons Zero license. Once you download the image, you can use it for any purpose from setting up your blog to printing brochures, without worrying about who to credit.

3. Superfamous

Superfamous was designed by Folkert Gorter. You can use varieties of images from different categories such as nature, technology, and abstract. Most of the images in this collection are taken from aerial view.

This source provides images under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license, which means you can use them in any way you like but you have to give the credit.

This site also contains links to other sites such as Cargocollective, which provides a collection of selected images from selected artists.

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4. Pexels

Pexels contains thousands of images and adds 10 new images each day. All the images in this site falls on the Creative Commons Zero license which allows unrestricted use of high quality images from its collection for personal and even for commercial use. You can even modify, copy and distribute the images.

In this source, most people search images under categories like summer, business, abstract and art. It guarantees to add 3600 new images each year, which makes it to be one of the biggest stock image sites.

5. Pixabay

Pixabay has a large collection of stunning images. With over 450,000 free photos, vectors, and arts illustrations, it offers you royalty free stock photos which you can use for commercial application. You don’t need to provide any attribution in digital or printed form to use Pixabay images.

This site also has the option of browsing by category. You can browse images from different categories like animals, education, backgrounds/textures, nature/landscapes, and many more.

6. Flickr

Flickr is the biggest image hosting web platform, which provides you 1,000 GB of free storage. Flickr also has a collection of millions of free stock images. It has always been a reliable source of high quality free images.

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Flickr has eight different license categories. Some are royalty free and some need credits. If you don’t want to give credit to the creator, then you can use images from ‘Free Use Photos’ section.

7. Stocksnap

Stocksnap selects the highest quality, highest resolution pictures and adds to its database regularly. Users consider it to be one of the best place on internet to find beautiful free stock photos.

All the images stored in this site fall under Creative Commons Zero license and hence do not require attribution. It collects best stock photos from the web and also uploads images from selected photographers. The motto of the site is to create a community of great photographers who want to share their art with the world.

8. Picography

Picography is the simplest site in this list. It has no options to search or browse by category. You can simply scroll down through the gallery. It offers you random photos from great photographers. It adds new photos to its gallery on a regular basis.

All the images are provided free of charge and under the Creative Commons Public Domain CC0 license. But it doesn’t allow you to advertise the photographs as your own.

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9. FreeImages

If you’re involved in web projects, then the best place to find free stock images is Freeimages. It has search options and lets you browse by category. These options can save you incredible time when you’re working. Most of the images in this site are of textures and backgrounds.

Three different forms of right are granted by the site: perpetual, non-exclusive and unlimited. You can use any image to copy, reproduce, modify, edit, display and publish in your work.

10. Picjumbo

Picjumbo is the latest free stock image site. It offers you high quality free images as well as a premium membership option. New images are added on a daily basis. So, you can check this site regularly to find images you may like. You can use a Picjumbo image for commericial use, HTML/PSD/PowerPoint templates and also print them on T-shirts.

The main drawback of this site is that it is an ad-funded site, so the ads may distract you.

Featured photo credit: Great Ararat via upload.wikimedia.org

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Nabin Paudyal

Co-Founder, Siplikan Media Group

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Last Updated on May 14, 2019

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

  1. Zoho Notebook
    If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
  2. Evernote
    The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
  3. Net Notes
    If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
  4. i-Lighter
    You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
  5. Clipmarks
    For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
  6. UberNote
    If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
  7. iLeonardo
    iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
  8. Zotero
    Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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