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5 Reasons You Shouldn’t Wear High Heels Anymore

5 Reasons You Shouldn’t Wear High Heels Anymore

High heels have been a long time fashion staple in women’s closets around the world. Unfortunately, there have been numerous studies that show the negative side effects that these shoes can have on feet. Luckily, there are plenty of flat-heeled shoes that are popular alternatives that still look stylish and will not leave you with aching feet at the end of the day.

They wreak havoc on your calves and Achilles’ tendon

According to a study done at  Manchester Metropolitan University in England, wearing high heels reduces the group of muscle fibers in the calf and contributes to increased stiffness in the Achilles’ tendon that is responsible for connecting the calf muscles to the heels. This effect is responsible for reducing the range of motion in the ankle. This study was conducted on eleven women who wear heels and nine who do not. The researchers began by scanning the women’s calf muscle make-up with an MRI and noted no differences between each group of women. But in a follow up examination, they noticed that the muscle fibers of the women in high heels were 13 percent shorter and have noticeably larger Achilles’ tendons.

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They can be the cause of lower back pain

Feet are a crucial foundation on which your body relies on. Wearing shoes that do not support them well can create a lot of unnecessary pain, including lower back aches. Wearing high heels also contributes to poor posture and put added pressure on your lower spine. Try trading your 4-inch pumps for shoes with less than 1-inch heels and you will be guaranteed to see a big difference.

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They help support traditional gender ideals

Even in this modern day and age, wearing high heels can be associated with a more traditional female role. This past year in the ultra-glitzy Cannes Film Festival in France, there was controversy over the alleged banning of a group of women who chose to wear rhinestone flats instead of heels. According to the festival’s strict dress code, women are only allowed to wear heels, even if they have a medical condition like some of the women in this banned group did. This archaic view on female beauty is not only present at high-society events, but also in the workplace and every day life as well. Health reasons aside, it is important to think of the message you are sending out if you decided to wear high heels.

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They may be sending the wrong signal

Research has shown that women wearing high heels are viewed as having more sex appeal and gain more attention from both sexes. A study performed by Nicolas Gueguen (2014) showed that women who dropped a glove in high heels were more likely to be notified by a male of the misplaced object by 93 percent in comparison to only 62 percent of the time for women who were wearing flats. In some cases, more attention is not something you want. High heels are known to elongate women’s legs, thus giving them model-like illusion. If you want to be seen less as a sex symbol, maybe it is time to reconsider wearing those sky high heels and trade them in for flats.

They are known to decrease credibility in the workplace

According to an article in The Atlantic, women who are striving to climb to the top in their career should stick to flats until they have reached their desired position, especially in male-saturated industries like tech. Wearing high heels creates a greater divide between men and women in the work place and are reminders of a woman’s femininity. Therefore, it is important to remember when you are planning your work wardrobe to think twice about your footwear and what message it will be sending at the office.

Featured photo credit: Augsburg, Germany. 2013. Crossing lines. / Boris Thaser via flickr.com

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Last Updated on April 8, 2020

Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

Assuming positive intent is an important contributor to quality of life.

Most people appreciate the dividends such a mindset produces in the realm of relationships. How can relationships flourish when you don’t assume intentions that may or may not be there? And how their partner can become an easier person to be around as a result of such a shift? Less appreciated in the GTD world, however, is the productivity aspect of this “assume positive intent” perspective.

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Most of us are guilty of letting our minds get distracted, our energy sapped, or our harmony compromised by thinking about what others woulda, coulda, shoulda.  How we got wronged by someone else.  How a friend could have been more respectful.  How a family member could have been less selfish.

However, once we evolve to understanding the folly of this mindset, we feel freer and we become more productive professionally due to the minimization of unhelpful, distracting thoughts.

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The leap happens when we realize two things:

  1. The self serving benefit from giving others the benefit of the doubt.
  2. The logic inherent in the assumption that others either have many things going on in their lives paving the way for misunderstandings.

Needless to say, this mindset does not mean that we ought to not confront people that are creating havoc in our world.  There are times when we need to call someone out for inflicting harm in our personal lives or the lives of others.

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Indra Nooyi, Chairman and CEO of Pepsi, says it best in an interview with Fortune magazine:

My father was an absolutely wonderful human being. From ecent emailhim I learned to always assume positive intent. Whatever anybody says or does, assume positive intent. You will be amazed at how your whole approach to a person or problem becomes very different. When you assume negative intent, you’re angry. If you take away that anger and assume positive intent, you will be amazed. Your emotional quotient goes up because you are no longer almost random in your response. You don’t get defensive. You don’t scream. You are trying to understand and listen because at your basic core you are saying, ‘Maybe they are saying something to me that I’m not hearing.’ So ‘assume positive intent’ has been a huge piece of advice for me.

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In business, sometimes in the heat of the moment, people say things. You can either misconstrue what they’re saying and assume they are trying to put you down, or you can say, ‘Wait a minute. Let me really get behind what they are saying to understand whether they’re reacting because they’re hurt, upset, confused, or they don’t understand what it is I’ve asked them to do.’ If you react from a negative perspective – because you didn’t like the way they reacted – then it just becomes two negatives fighting each other. But when you assume positive intent, I think often what happens is the other person says, ‘Hey, wait a minute, maybe I’m wrong in reacting the way I do because this person is really making an effort.

“Assume positive intent” is definitely a top quality of life’s best practice among the people I have met so far. The reasons are obvious. It will make you feel better, your relationships will thrive and it’s an approach more greatly aligned with reality.  But less understood is how such a shift in mindset brings your professional game to a different level.

Not only does such a shift make you more likable to your colleagues, but it also unleashes your talents further through a more focused, less distracted mind.

More Tips About Building Positive Relationships

Featured photo credit: Christina @ wocintechchat.com via unsplash.com

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