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How To Recognize A Heart Attack One Month Before It Happens

How To Recognize A Heart Attack One Month Before It Happens

Heart conditions are a real issue in America. High volumes of morbid obesity and unhealthy habits run rampant. The American diet plays a huge role in heart health issues, as does our love for tobacco products and often lazy mindsets.

Every year, about 720,000 Americans suffer a heart attack. This constitutes for a total of one in four deaths in the United States. That equates to roughly 5 deaths per minute!

While most heart conditions are linked to unhealthy or careless lifestyles, heart attacks can strike without a moment’s notice.
Last year, my father began experiencing a multitude of heart related problems that were set in motion by a severe heart attack. This came as a huge shock to everyone, because my dad is essentially a model of good health for a middle-aged man. He maintains a healthy diet and weight, exercises very regularly, and stays properly hydrated.

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However, in spite of all of this, a heart attack still happened.

My father has seen a plethora of problems following the unexpected cardiac health issues. Subsequent medications stacked up, ER visits have become regular occurrences, and spells of dizziness and unconscious streaks all started to feel eerily normal. A pacemaker was put into my father’s chest once multiple heart attacks surfaced. Through the unexpected twists and turns associated with all of this, I’ve learned a lot about heart health.

Prevention is hands down the best medicine for a healthy heart, but it’s important to first understand the early warning signs of a potential heart attack.

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Fatigue/Weakness

Feeling weak and a devoid of energy can say a lot about your heart health. When your arteries become more narrow, the amount of blood flow to your heart decreases. This can leave you feeling weak and may be a sign of future heart attacks, or poor circulation. If this is starting to feel like an everyday occurrence, do not ignore these symptoms.

Cold Sweats/Dizziness

Experiencing excessive dizziness and clamminess is also a trigger warning. This is commonly associated with sub par blood flow. When my father first started experiencing heart health issues, he was feeling noticeably dizzy all the time. Before his first attack, my father passed out at work for seemingly no reason at all. This raised a red flag, and the heart attack happened the same day.

Flu-Like Symptoms

Symptoms of the flu include pain in the joints and muscles, sore throat, nasal cavity congestion or discomfort, shortness of breath, severe headaches, and all around body aches and pains. A lot of people who experience a heart attack notice these symptoms during this timeframe.

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Chest Pressure

This one is very blunt and straight forward. One of the most tell all symptoms of a heart attack is chest pain. Whether it’s moderate to severe pressure, or even a noticeable minor pain, do not overlook this detail. This is the most common predecessor to a heart attack, and generally means something is about to happen in regards to your heart health.

For a more in depth look at these symptoms, check out a similar post by The Spirit Science.

The Differences Between Men and Women’s Symptoms

Although all of these symptoms can be present as early warning signs for either gender, there are some additional early warning signs present for women specifically.

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For women, the pain attributed to the early stages of heart issues can often feel similar to indigestion. This is very dangerous because it is commonly overlooked. Pain in between the should blades can be an early tell as well. Additionally chest pain may be slightly more mild, but more persistent.

Below are a few ways to combat heart attacks if you or a loved one ever experiences heart problems.

Medications

Taking prescribed heart medications will obviously help with heart issues. But it’s crucially important to make sure that any current medications are properly accounted for before you start new heart medications. In the case of my father, this was surprisingly overlooked. His medications stacked on themselves and had some very poor side effects. Avoid this at all costs by triple checking with your doctor.

Lifestyle Factors/Bad Habits

Poor diet and a lack of exercise showcase typical American bad habits. Processed foods, sugar and television addictions, and drive-thru mentalities just scratch the surface. The good news is that anyone can break the mold of these poor lifestyle choices. Try riding your bike to work, and eating foods that are actually beneficial to your heart health. Heart healthy exercises will become your best friend.
If these symptoms are prevalent in your life, it’s definitely recommended that you see a doctor as soon as possible. Don’t let health insurance or costs associated with medical care sway you away from getting checked out. Even if you aren’t in the midst of a heart condition, it’s much better to be safe than sorry.

Featured photo credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/sheishine/ via flickr.com

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Robert Parmer

Freelance Writer

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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