Advertising
Advertising

7 Insider Secrets for Booking Cheap Flights

7 Insider Secrets for Booking Cheap Flights

Buying the plane ticket is the most expensive aspect of taking a trip and can often determine where and when you travel. There are many travel booking websites that you can choose to shop from, and a range of advice available in travel magazines and on blogs. This can make it overwhelming to decide which resources to utilize. Luckily, here is a list of the secrets to finding cheaper flights, which will allow you to take that dream trip you always wanted.

1. Be flexible with when you travel

With a little bit of careful planning, you can schedule your trip so that it falls on days that are the cheapest to fly on. The weekend is always the most expensive, whereas weekdays are much cheaper. Early morning and late at night are also ideal for budget airfare, because most people prefer daytime travel. Before or after a major holiday is also a good time to shop around for flights, because you will miss the holiday travel rush.

Advertising

2. Be flexible with your flight route

Kayak, one of the more popular sites for looking up flights has a tool called ‘Explore‘; this displays the cheapest tickets from your home airport to locations around the globe. This feature lets you search by season or by month. Google Flights also has a similar tool where you can type in your home airport and your destination and see all the prices for a certain time period.

3. Fly into a secondary airport on a budget carrier

Most major destinations have a primary airport and a smaller secondary one. The smaller airport is where most budget airlines will arrive, because the landing fee is less than at a smaller airport. It is important to check how close the secondary airport is to your final destination, since the cost of ground transportation can add up quickly if the airport is quite remote.

Advertising

4. Check out alternative routes

Sometimes it is cheaper to book separate legs for your trip, instead of flying straight. For example, instead of flying directly to Istanbul from New York, it might be cheaper to fly to Iceland and then catch a European budget airline to Istanbul from there. The extra time that you spend searching for alternative routes will be worth it if you find a flight or flights that will save you considerable money in the long run.

5. Utilize social media

Following the twitter accounts of airlines and travel search engines is a great way to be updated on new flight deals the moment they are published. The twitter accounts for websites like Wanderlisting and airline companies like JetBlue and Virgin Atlantic are just a few accounts that are known to tweet some great deals.

Advertising

6. Shop on multiple booking sites

When you are searching for a flight on popular websites like Kayak or Orbitz, remember that airlines can have ties with them and that prices are not unbiased. It is important to shop around on as many sites as possible and make sure that you are getting the best price possible. Not all booking sites account for all airlines, especially budget ones, and they also do not always cover every region of the world equally.

7. Book directly with an airline

Sometimes it is cheaper to book with an airline directly, especially if they are not featured on booking sites (usually budget airlines). Sometimes airlines also have sales directly on their site that are not found elsewhere and this can make a significant difference in your ticket price. Another bonus to checking a fare on an airline’s actual site is that all additional fees are always transparent, including those pesky baggage fees.

Advertising

Featured photo credit: Flickr via flickr.com

More by this author

10 Reasons Why You Should Have A Drummer Girlfriend 10 Things Only Step-Siblings Can Relate To What It Really Feels Like To Be An Only Child Introverts Are More Successful In Life 10 Traps Most Women Over 30 Fall Into. Read This If You Want To Be The Survivors

Trending in Budget Activity

1 6 Easy Ways to Treat Yourself 2 7 Websites to Sell Used Stuff Profitably 3 Seven Tips to Save Money While Renovating Your Home 4 4 Ways to Make Every Penny Stretch in 2017 5 Getting Out of Debt in 4 Simple Steps

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on March 4, 2019

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

Many people will suggest that the best thing to do with your credit cards during these tough economic times is to cut them up with a pair of scissors. Indeed, if you are already in huge debt, you probably should stop using them and begin a payback strategy immediately. However, if you are not currently in trouble with your credit cards, there are wise ways to use them.

I happen to really love my credit cards so I will share with you my approach to how I use mine without getting into deep financial trouble.

Ever since about 1983 when I got my first Visa card, I continue to charge as many of my purchases as possible on credit. Everything from gas, groceries and monthly payments for services like my cable and home security monitoring are charged on credit. Despite my heavy usage, I have maintained the joy of never paying any interest fees at all on any of my credit cards.

Advertising

Here are some tips on how best to use your credit cards without falling into the trap of paying those nasty double-digit interest fees.

Do Not Treat Credit Cards as Your Funding Sources

Too many people treat their credit cards as funding sources for major purchases. Do not do this if you want to stay out of trouble. I use my credit cards as convenient financial instruments so I do not have to carry around much cash. In fact, I hate carrying cash, especially coins. When you buy things on credit, the purchases are clean and you will not get annoying coins back as change.

I do not rely on my Visa, MasterCard or American Express to fund any of my purchases, large or small. This brings me to my golden rule when it comes to whether I will pull out any of my credit cards either at a retail or online store.

Advertising

I never purchase anything with my credit cards if I do not have the actual cash on hand in my bank account.

If I really cannot pay for the item or service with cash that I already have at the bank, then I simply will not make the purchase. Remember, my credit cards are not used as funding sources. They are just convenient alternatives to actual cash in my pocket.

Make Sure to Always Pay Off Balances in Full Each Month

The next very important part of my overall strategy is to make absolutely sure that I pay the balances in full each and every month no matter how large they are. This should never be a problem if the cash has been budgeted for my purchases and secured in the bank. I have always paid my full balances each month ever since my very first credit card and this is why I never pay interest charges.

Advertising

Using Credit Cards with Rewards

Most of my credit cards are of the “no annual fees” type, including one MasterCard on a separate account I keep at home as a spare in case I lose my wallet or incur any fraudulent charges. However, I do use a main Visa card which does have an annual fee because all purchases on that card reward me with airline frequent flyer points. For me, the annual fee is worth it since I do travel and I get enough points to redeem many free flights.

You have to decide for yourself if you will charge enough purchases on credit each year without paying interest charges to warrant a credit card that rewards you with airline points (or other rewards). In my case, the answer is “yes” but that might not be the case for you.

I occasionally use a MasterCard or American Express card on small purchases just to keep those accounts active. Also, I have been to the odd retailer that accepted only a certain type of credit card, so I find that having one from each major company is quite handy. Aside from my main Visa card which earns the airline points, the rest of my cards are of the “no annual fees” variety.

Advertising

So this is how I use my credit cards without getting into any financial trouble with them. This strategy is recommended only if you are not in debt, of course. In fact, it is worth keeping in mind once you’re out of debt so that you can keep your credit cards active and treat them responsibly.

What are your credit card usage strategies? Let me know in the comments — I’d love to hear what methods you use.

Featured photo credit: Artem Bali via unsplash.com

Read Next