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7 Ways for Extroverts to Manage Their Teams of Introverts Well

7 Ways for Extroverts to Manage Their Teams of Introverts Well

If you have a team of introverts to manage, consider yourself lucky. Introverts have great insights and listen well. They are independent and observant. Having them on your team is valuable.

However, as an extrovert, you have a different communication and working style from them. You may find it difficult to connect or understand your introverted subordinates. Sometimes, they may even seem a little aloof and unapproachable to you. So how do you nurture their talent and get them to contribute more?

Here are 7 ways to help you manage your teams of introverts well.

1. Listen.

Never interrupt your introverted subordinates when they are talking. It takes time and effort for them to process and share their thoughts with you. Extroverts have the tendency to brainstorm out loud in groups. But refrain from adding your inputs before your introverted subordinates complete their speech.

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Brainstorming out loud is ineffective to introverts. Not only are your breaking their train of thoughts, but they may think you aren’t receptive to new ideas. So they may not share their ideas with you in the future.

2. Give them time to think.

Don’t get your introverted subordinates to share their opinions on the spot, especially in a meeting. You won’t get much out of them. Introverts need time away from people to reflect on their own. They need to formulate their ideas and thoughts before sharing with others.

Instead of asking them to contribute spontaneously at a meeting, give them the questions or detailed agendas a day before the meeting. This gives them ample time to prepare and think about the problems. You will be amazed by how many insights they contribute when you do that.

3. Divide them into smaller teams.

Introverts work better in one-in-one setting and smaller groups. If your team is too big, you may consider dividing your team into smaller sub-teams. These allow introverts to forge better relationships and communicate with one another better.

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This applies to team-building activities too. If you are organizing games for your team, divide them into smaller groups. The participatory level of introverts increases as the group gets smaller.

4. Use written communication.

Sometimes, the best way to communicate with introverts is to use written communication, such as emails. Group chat messenger is also useful to build the relationship of the team members.

Written communication is better for introverts because it’s less simulating. Introverts get overwhelmed quickly from face-to-face interactions. They pick up non-verbal body cues and energy from others during conversations too. Thus, they get tired easily from verbal communication.

5. Provide them a quiet work space.

Introverts need a private and quiet place to work. They find it hard to concentrate at work when their colleagues are constantly talking and interrupting them. Some of them may even get so frustrated and unhappy with their lack of productivity that they feel resentment towards their fellow co-workers.

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If possible, give introverts their own cubicles. Give them the peace and space to work independently. If this is not possible, at least separate them from your other extroverted subordinates. Allocate a room for people who want to work quietly so that they can work without interruptions.

6. Redesign your performance appraisal.

Never judge your introverted subordinates’ work capability by their ability to socialize and communicate with people. They will feel unappreciated and unfair because being quiet is their strength. It allows them to collect information and be analytical.

Furthermore, talking less doesn’t mean they are bad communicators. They connect with people well by listening to them intently. They can achieve the outcome you want but with a different method. So their performance should be appraised based on the work they have done and not how similar they are to you.

7. Allow them to be themselves.

As a manager or a boss, it’s your duty to bring out the best in your team. Motivating them to improve themselves is good, but don’t pressure your team members to be someone they aren’t.

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Don’t make social or networking events compulsory for them. Give them a choice. Introverts don’t get as much value from these events as extroverts do. Also, don’t force them to go for presentation workshops if they aren’t interested. You should tap on their strengths instead of focusing on their weaknesses.

Featured photo credit: Encuentro de Empresas del Sector Turístico / Franklin Tello via flickr.com

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Yong Kang Chan

Self-Help Author (Writes about Self-Compassion and Mindfulness)

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Last Updated on July 27, 2020

How to Find Your Entrepreneurial Passion and Purpose

How to Find Your Entrepreneurial Passion and Purpose

I wrote a few articles about starting a business based on something you love doing and are passionate about. I received several responses from people saying they weren’t sure how to go about figuring out what they were most passionate about or how to find their true purpose. So I’m dedicating this article to these issues — how to find your entrepreneurial passion and purpose.

When I work with a new client, the first thing we talk about is lifestyle design. I ask each client, “What do you want your life to look like?” If you designed a business without answering this question, you could create a nice, profitable business that is completely incompatible with your goals in life. You’d be making money, but you’d probably be miserable.

When you’re looking for your life purpose, lifestyle design isn’t a crucial component. However, since we’re talking about entrepreneurial purpose, lifestyle design is indeed crucial to building a business that you’ll enjoy and truly be passionate about.

For example, say you want to spend more time at home with your family. Would you be happy with a business that kept you in an office or out of town much of the time? On the flip side, if you wanted to travel and see the world, how well could you accomplish that goal if your business required your presence, day in and day out, to survive? So start by getting some clarity on your personal goals and spend some time working on designing your life.

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At this point, you may need a little prodding, and you may want to hire a coach or mentor to work with you through this process. Many people are very used to the idea that there is a particular way a life “should” be. There are certain milestones most people tend to live by, and if you don’t meet those markers when or in the manner you’re “supposed” to meet them, that can cause some anxiety.

Here’s how to find your passion and purpose:

Give Yourself Permission to Dream a Little

Remember that this is your life and you can live it however you choose. Call it meditation or fantasy, but let your imagination run here. And answer this question:

“If you had no fears or financial limitations, what would your ideal life, one in which you could be totally content and happy, look like?”

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Once you’ve figured out your lifestyle design, it’s time to do a little more soul-searching to figure out what you’re truly passionate about. This is a time to really look within and look back.

Specifically, look back over your life history. When were you the happiest? What did you enjoy doing the most? Remember that what you’re looking for doesn’t necessarily have to be an entire job, but can actually be aspects of your past jobs or hobbies that you’ve really enjoyed.

Think About a Larger Life Purpose

Many successful entrepreneurs have earned their place in history by setting out to make a difference in the world. Is there a specific issue or cause that is important to you or that you’re particularly passionate about?

For some, this process of discovery may come easily. You may go through these questions and thought experiments and find the answers quickly. For others, it may be more difficult. In some cases, you may suffer from a generalized lack of passion and purpose in your life.

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Sometimes, this can come from having suppressed passion in your life for too long. Sometimes, it can come from eating poorly and lack of exercise. But occasionally, it may have something to do with your internal chemistry or programming. If the latter applies to you, it may be useful for you to seek help in the form of a coach, mentor, or counselor.

In other cases, not knowing your true purpose may be a matter of having not discovered it yet: you may not have found anything that makes your heart beat faster. If this is the case, now is the time to explore!

The Internet is a fantastic tool for learning and exploration. Search hobbies and careers and learn as much as you can about any topic that triggers your interest, then follow up at the library on the things that really intrigue you. Again, remember that this is your life and only you can give yourself permission to explore all that the world has available to you.

How Do You Know When You’ve Found Your True Entrepreneurial Purpose?

I can only tell you how I knew when I had discovered my own — it didn’t hit me like a ton of bricks. Rather, it settled over me, bringing a deep sense of peace and commitment. It felt like I had arrived home and knew exactly what to do and how to proceed.

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Everything flowed easily from that point forward. That’s not to say that I found success immediately after that moment. But rather, the path ahead of me was clear, so I knew what to do.

Decisions were easier and came faster to me. And success has come on MY terms, according to my own definitions of what success means to me in my own lifestyle design.

Dig deep, look within, and seek whatever help you need. Once you find that purpose and passion, your life — not just your entrepreneurial life, but your entire life — will never be the same.

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Featured photo credit: Garrhet Sampson via unsplash.com

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