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People Judge Your Personality Based On These 7 Small Things

People Judge Your Personality Based On These 7 Small Things

From the moment you meet someone for the first time, you quickly want to assess who the person is and what they represent. This is why you may be on the lookout for certain stable qualities like honesty, kindness and intelligence.

Paying attention to these things may even help you evaluate if you will want to pursue an intimate relationship with this person or not.

Such judgment of character could be helpful on major decisions such as pursuing a romantic relationship, employing an individual or accepting a job offer. Based on these things, this is how people judge your personality and determine who you are and who you might not be.

1. Your handwriting

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    According to a study, the way someone writes and the size of their handwriting can tell you certain things about the person. According to the research which was conducted by the National Pen Company, it is revealed that persons with small handwriting tend to be shy, meticulous and studious while people who were more outgoing tried gaining attention with larger handwriting.

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    Those who take things seriously put more pressure on the pen when they write, while light-handed writers typically tend to be empathetic and are more sensitive.

    2. Your color

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      According to an article on Psychology Today, the color you frequently turn to for clothes or are more akin to says a lot about who you are. People who frequently choose black are sensitive, artistic and attentive to details, while those who love red live life to the fullest and proactive in their endeavors.

      People who love green are loyal and affectionate, while those who love white are organized and logical, and those who have blue as their favorite color are stable, sensitive and are considerate of others.

      3. Biting your nails

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        Certain body-focused repetitive behaviors can say a lot about your personality. How your body reacts to situations, whether by pulling your hair, biting your nails or picking at your skin could elicit impatience, frustration, boredom and dissatisfaction.

        Take nail biting for example. According to a research, it is suggested that those who bite their nails tend to be perfectionists, while also tense and often nervous.

        4. Your shoes

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          According to psychologists, you can correctly judge a person just by looking at their shoes. According to the lead researcher Omri Gillath from the University of Kansas, just by examining the cost, style, color and condition of the shoe, you can be able to guess about 90% of the owner’s personal characteristic such as his or her income, political affiliation, gender, and even age.

          5. Your eyes

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            Your eyes are the mirror to your soul. Your eyes can tell a lot about you, what you are thinking and feeling and if you are either deceitful or loyal. According to studies, people with blue eyes are less agreeable and more likely to be alcoholics than people with darker eyes.

            Another way the eye gives you away is that a lack of steady eye contact would reveal a lack of self-control and a weak will.

            6. Your punctuality

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              How early or late you show up for an appointment or a meeting could form an impression, either negative or positive, about your personality. Being late for an important date means you are creating a negative impression about who you are, while being early for an appointment means you are considerate about other people’s time, and are both mentally organized and self-motivated.

              7. Your handshake

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                It has been discovered that people with a strong handshake exude confidence and reflect a strong and confident character. Such people are also more likely to be extroverted, being expressive of their emotions, and less likely to be placid.

                People with weak handshakes, on the other hand, lack confidence and always tend to want the easy way out of a challenge. Offering a handshake alone could be the different between appearing standoffish or sincerely friendly.

                Featured photo credit: http://www.pixabay.com via pixabay.com

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                Casey Imafidon

                Specialized in motivation and personal growth, providing advice to make readers fulfilled and spurred on to achieve all that they desire in life.

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                Last Updated on June 24, 2019

                Why Social Media Might Be Causing Depression

                Why Social Media Might Be Causing Depression

                A study [1] published in Depression and Anxiety found that social media users are more likely to be depressed. This was just one of the huge number of studies linking social media and depression[2] . But why exactly do platforms like Facebook and Instagram make people so unhappy? Well, we don’t know yet for sure, but there are some explanations.

                Social Media Could Lead to Depression

                Depression is a serious medical condition that affects how you think, feel, and behave. Social media may lead to depression in predisposed individuals or make existing symptoms of depression[3] worse explains[4] the study above’s senior author Dr. Brian Primack. So, the problem may not be in social media per se, but how we use it.

                Signs You’re Suffering From “Social Media Depression”

                If you feel like social media is having a negative impact on your mood, then you may be suffering from “social media depression.” Look for symptoms like:

                • low self-esteem,

                • negative self-talk,

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                • a low mood,

                • irritability,

                • a lack of interest in activities once enjoyed,

                • and social withdrawal.

                If you’ve had these symptoms for more than two weeks and if this is how you feel most of the time, then you are likely depressed. Although “social media depression “is not a term recognized in the medical setting, social media depression seems to be a real phenomenon affecting around 50% of social media users. As explained in a review study[5] published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, if a person has a certain predisposition to depression and other mental disorders, social media use may only worsen their mental health.

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                Social Media Could Crush Self-Esteem

                We know that social media and depression are in some way linked, but why is this so? Well, according to Igor Pantic, MD, Ph.D.[6], social media use skews your perception about other people’s lives and traits. To explain this further, most people like to portray an idealized image of their lives, personal traits, and appearance on sites like Facebook and Instagram. If you confuse this idealized image with reality, you may be under the false impression that everyone is better than you which can crush your self-esteem and lead to depression. This is especially true for teens and young adults who are more likely to compare themselves to others. If you already suffer from low self-esteem, the illusion that everyone has it better off than you will just make you feel worse.

                Causing Social Isolation and Other Negative Emotions

                Another commonly cited reason for the negative impact of social media on mental health is its link with social isolation. Depressed people are more likely to isolate themselves socially and chose only to interact indirectly through social media platforms. But communication online tends to be superficial and is lacking when compared to real-life interaction explains Panic. What this means is not that social media leads to isolation but the other way around, possibly explaining why we find so many depressed persons on these sites.

                Lastly, social media use may generate negative emotions in you like envy, jealousy, dislike, loneliness, and many others and this may worsen your depressive symptoms.

                Why We Need to Take This Seriously

                Both depression and social media use are on the rise according to epidemiological studies. Since each one has an impact on the other, we have to start thinking of healthier ways to use social media. Teens and young adults are especially vulnerable to the negative impact of social media on mental health.

                Advice on Social Media Use

                Although these findings did not provide any cause-effect explanation regarding Facebook and depression[7], they still do prove that social media use may not be a good way to handle depression. For this reason, the leading authors of these studies gave some suggestions as to how clinicians and people can make use of such findings.

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                One suggestion is that clinicians should ask patients about their social media habits. Then they can advise them on how to change their outlook on social media use or even suggest limiting their time spent on social media.

                Some social media users may also exhibit addictive behavior; they may spend too much time due to compulsive urges. Any compulsive behavior is bound to lead to feelings of guilt which can worsen depressive symptoms.

                Having Unhealthy Relationship with Social Media

                If you feel like your relationship with social media is unhealthy, then consider the advice on healthy social media use provided by psychology experts from Links Psychology[8]:

                Avoid negative social comparison – always keep in mind that how people portray themselves and their lives on social media is not a realistic picture, but rather an idealized one. Also, avoid comparing yourself to others because this behavior can lead to negative self-talk.

                Remember that social media is not a replacement for real life – Social media is great for staying in touch and having fun, but it should never replace real-world interactions.

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                Avoid releasing personal information – For your safety and privacy, make sure to be careful with what you post online.

                Report users who bully and harass you – It’s easy to be a bully in the anonymous and distant world of social media. Don’t take such offense personally and report those who abuse social media to harass others.

                The bits of advice listed above can help you establish a healthy relationship with social media. Always keep these things in mind to avoid losing an objective perspective of what social media is and how it is different from real life. If you are currently suffering from depression, talk to your doctor about what is bothering you so that you can get the treatment you need to get better. Tell your doctor about your social media use and see if they could give you some advice on this topic.

                Reference

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