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She used to hate math, but now she teaches it for a living

She used to hate math, but now she teaches it for a living

Like so many school-aged children, Saundra Carter hated math growing up. The subject just wasn’t applicable to her life, so she didn’t see the point in becoming a master at it. Fortunately for her, that all changed when she entered 11th grade and was placed in Mr. Frank’s Algebra 2 class.

Carter’s outlook on the world of mathematics changed because her teacher did was so many teachers before him never did: made math matter in Saundra’s day-to-day life. He used real-world situations that 15-year-old children would actually encounter in their time outside of school, rather than hypothetical situations that no real human has ever found themselves in. Using “real-world examples and things kids like “such as sports,” Saundra says, Mr. Frank was able to change her perspective on the subject completely.

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Now, Saundra owns a tutoring business called Math 1 on 1 LLC. The premise is simple: Pass on the excitement for math Saundra had passed on to her that fateful year in high school. In doing so, you’ll help unleash the mathematical wizard hidden in even the most reluctant students.

The Atlanta-based business consists of college students and recent graduates who help tutor children and adults of all ages in the various stages of mathematics. Each student is provided with a two-hour screening process which helps tutors identify strengths and weaknesses pertaining to their mathematical ability. Through careful analysis of a student’s initial performance, an individualized learning plan is created, putting each student on their own path to success. Saundra reports that students’ SAT scores in math increase an average of 50 points after their tutoring sessions are complete.

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Saundra is the author of How to Help Parents and Kids Get Over the Fear of Math, a book with tips for parents and kids who want to get over their fear of math (sorry, I had to!). In all seriousness, the book has gained rave reviews on Amazon, with parents and children alike praising Saundra’s hints and tips that “make the process of learning math easier.” Adults that read it in order to better help their children actually reported that they learned more about a few concepts they thought they had previously mastered. One reader said, “I learned a few new things and refreshed knowledge that has long been dormant.”

Along with helping struggling students through Math 1 on 1 LLC, Saundra also hopes to tackle some of the stigmas surrounding the world of mathematics, like the idea that girls aren’t good at math

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If a girl isn’t good at math, it’s most likely because she was told she isn’t good at math. While it’s no secret that men make up the majority of people working in math-related industries, this is simply because young women are dissuaded from becoming math wizards at the elementary level. A combination of factors affect girls’ interest (or lack thereof) in the world of mathematics, such as the fact that math-related toys and games are usually advertised to boys. Parents and teachers should ensure they don’t unintentionally place gender biases on their children, and give them a choice of what, and how, they want to study.

Some people just “aren’t math people”. This statement piggybacks off of the last point made. So many children (and adults, for that matter) just throw their hands up and say, “I can’t do this.” Of course, nothing can be accomplished with such a negative attitude. Again, this idea of being incompetent in a specific subject or area stems from experiences in childhood in which a teacher may not have given a child enough time or attention to help them understand a certain concept, which led to them falling behind for the remainder of the year. It’s a self-fulfilling prophecy, in which children who are told they aren’t good at math don’t try to get better, and grow into adults who really aren’t good at it.

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By sharing her story with the world, Saundra aims to eradicate these two misconceptions, and foster a love of math in all children in the Atlanta area and beyond.

Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm3.staticflickr.com

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Matt Duczeminski

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Last Updated on November 3, 2020

How to Mind Map to Visualize Ideas (With Mind Map Examples)

How to Mind Map to Visualize Ideas (With Mind Map Examples)

When you have a lot of ideas in your mind, you may create a text document, or take a sheet of paper and start writing in a linear fashion. However, this type of document quickly becomes overwhelming. It lacks in clarity and makes it hard for you to get a full picture at a glance and see what is missing. Instead, try looking at some mind map examples to learn how to mind map and visualize your thoughts.

Mind maps can help you zoom out and see the whole hierarchy and how everything is connected. You may see connections you were missing before and find new ways of brainstorming solutions.

Below, you’ll find more information on mind maps and see some mind map examples to inspire you next time you need to organize information.

What Is a Mind Map?

A mind map is a simple hierarchical radial diagram invented by Tony Buzan[1]. In other words, you organize your thoughts around a central idea. This technique is especially useful whenever you need to declutter your brain or develop an idea, a project (for example, a new product or service), a problem, a solution, etc. By capturing what you have in your head, you make space for other thoughts.

In this article, we are focusing on the basics: mind mapping using a pen and paper.

The objective of a mind map is to clearly visualize all your thoughts and ideas. Don’t complicate a mind map with too many colors or distractions. Use different colors only when they serve a purpose. Always keep a mind map simple and easy to follow.

How to mind map: Mind map example

    Image Credit: English Central

    By following the three next steps below, you will be able to create such mind maps easily and quickly.

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    3 Simple Steps to Create a Mind Map

    The three steps are:

    1. Set a central topic
    2. Add branches of related ideas
    3. Add sub-branches for more relevant ideas

    Let’s take a look at an example Verbal To Visual illustrates on the benefits of mind mapping.[2]

    Step 1 : Set a Central Topic

    Take a blank sheet of paper, write down the topic you’ve been thinking about: a problem, a decision to make, an idea to develop, or a project to clarify.

    Word it in a clear and concise manner. It can be a single word or even a central image.

    How to mind map: start with a central idea

      Step 2 : Add Branches of Related Ideas

      What is the first idea that comes to mind when you think of the subject for your mind map? Draw a line (straight or curved) from the central topic, and write down that idea.

        Step 3 : Add Sub-Branches for More Relevant Ideas

        Then, what does that idea make you think of? What is related to it? List it out nearby by connecting it with shorter lines or a line of a different color. Ensure that it remains organized.

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          You can always add images or other branches later, but that’s good for now.

          In our example, we could detail the sub-branch “Benefits” by listing those benefits in sub-branches of the branch “Benefits.” Unfortunately, we already reached the side of the sheet, so we’re out of space to do so. You could always draw a line to a white space on the page and list them there, but it’s awkward.

          Since we created this mind map on a regular letter-format sheet of paper, the quantity of information that fits in there is very limited. That is one of the main reasons why I recommend that you use software rather than pen and paper for most of the mind mapping that you do.

          Repeat Step 2 and Step 3

          Repeat steps 2 and 3 as many times as you need to flush out all of your ideas around the topic that you chose.

          Mind map example

            I added first-level (main) branches around the central topic mostly in a clockwise fashion, from top-right to top-left. That is how, by convention, a mind map is read.

            In the next section, we are covering the three strategies to building your maps.  

            Mind Map Examples to Illustrate Mind Mapping

            You can go about creating a mind map in various ways:

            • Branch by Branch: Adding whole branches (with all of their sub-branches), one by one.
            • Level by Level: Adding elements to the map, one level at a time. That means that firstly, you add elements around the central topic (main branches). Then, you add sub-branches to those main branches.
            • Free-Flow: Adding elements to your mind map as they come to you, in no particular order.

            Branch by Branch

            Start with the central topic, and add a first branch. Focus on that branch and detail it as much as you can by adding all the sub-branches that you can think of.

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              Then develop ideas branch by branch.

                One your ideas have filled the branches, the mind map is complete.

                Branch by branch mind map example

                  Level by Level

                  In this “Level by Level” strategy of mind map examples, you first add all the elements that you can think of around the central topic, one level deep only. Here, you add elements on level 1:

                    Then, go over each branch and add the immediate sub-branches (one level only). This is level 2:

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                      Do the same for the next level (level 3). You can have as many levels as you want in a mind map. In our example, we only have 3 levels. Now the map is complete:

                      Level by level mind map example

                        Free-Flow

                        Basically, a free flow strategy of mind mapping is to add main branches and sub-topics freely. There are no rules to restrict how ideas should flow in the mind map. The only thing to pay attention to is that you need to be careful about the level of the ideas you’re adding to the mind map — is it a main topic, or is it a subtopic?

                        Free flow mind map example

                          Try each strategy and combinations of strategies, and see what works best for you to help you start problem solving.

                          The Bottom Line

                          When you’re feeling stuck or when you’re just starting to think about a particular idea or project, take out a paper and start to brain dump your ideas and create a mind map using the mind map examples above. Mind mapping has the magic to clear your head and organize your thoughts.

                          If you can’t always have access to a paper and pen, don’t worry! Creating a mind map with software is very effective, and you get none of the drawbacks of pen and paper. You can also apply the above steps and strategies just the same when using a mind mapping tool on a phone and computer.

                          More Tools to Help You Organize Thoughts

                          Featured photo credit: Alvaro Reyes via unsplash.com

                          Reference

                          [1] Tony Buzan Group: Home
                          [2] Verbal to Visual: A Mind Mapping Approach To Your Sketchnotes

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