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10 Quality Online Courses To Make You Successful Entrepreneurs

10 Quality Online Courses To Make You Successful Entrepreneurs
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As technology continues to evolve at a fast pace, it becomes clear that it affects the way things get done.  As an Entrepreneur, it is important to stay ahead of the curve, taking the opportunity to prepare yourself in order to provide quality results.  This usually means making the time to continue your education.  Enrolling in online classes is a great way to improve your skills and to gain new skills, because you can set your own hours in order to fit a learning opportunity in with your busy schedule.  The opportunities are invaluable for Entrepreneurs whether you are starting out or have years of experience under your belt.

You now have the opportunity to learn and to grow your business from the privacy of your home, with affordable courses.  Not every course is long and strenuous; from coaching programs, to mini courses and engaging video courses, there is something for every Entrepreneur.

Below is a list of 10 Quality Online Courses to Make Help You to Succeed as an Entrepreneur.

10 Quality Online Courses to Make You Successful Entrepreneurs

    1. Redefining Branding: A Beginner’s Guide to Understanding & Mastering Branding by Analyzing The Best

    This unique course, specifically structured for Female Entrepreneurs, approaches branding by analyzing the best in order to help you gain insight into your own challenges, and mistakes.

    The 6 week program will be an opportunity for you to truly understand what it takes to build a successful, powerhouse brand, by exploring the most powerful brand.  You will have the opportunity to dissect your own brand strategy as you compare it to one that works in order to understand why you may be failing.

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    A fun opportunity to connect with other Entrepreneurs through our secret Facebook Group, in staying true to the Chic Mompreneur Vision our hope is that this will not only be a learning opportunity, but an opportunity to create invaluable connections with like minded women.

    This 6 week course begins September 1st, Enroll today, to secure a place today!

    2. Savvy Branding: How to Build an Irresistible Brand

    This awesome mini course is taught by Amazon Best Selling Author and the founder of Red Slice, Maria Ross. It answers the questions so many Entrepreneurs have about branding. The course, if provided through Learn Savvy, is a one stop shop for women to gain the business, technical and life skills they need. This premier educational marketplace allows women to not only teach, but to learn together. The Savvy Branding course will allow you to create an irresistible brand for your business.  Helping you to understand why branding is more than just a logo and how to create the essence, value and promise that needs to be communicated to your audience.  A step by step process for building a rock-solid online and offline brand strategy. Take a class, Give a Class, Means that for every course you purchase, Learn Savvy will donate a class to a woman who would not be able to afford to take a class. Get started on Learn Savvy.

    3.  Characteristics of The Successful Entrepreneur

    Jeff Hawkins is the co-founder of Palm and Handspring, he is also the architect of the Palm Pilot and the Treo smartphone and many other computing products.  This course is an opportunity to follow the journey of an established entrepreneur and see the valuable lessons learned, challenges with work/life balance, and more.  Hawkins discusses how to design successful products, market research and the importance of testing products continuously.  There is a lot to be learned from the experience of Jeff Hawkins, and he tackles it all. This is a great option for business students interested in technology.

    For more information about Characteristics of The Successful Entrepreneur, with Jeff Hawkins, visit the site here.

    4. Entrepreneurship–From Idea to Launch

    Over 44,000 students have completed this Udemy course, by Dr. Jeff Cornwall.  New to business or considering Entrepreneurship as an option? Join the 44,097 students who have taken this course in order to gain a practical understanding of what it takes to turn an idea into a successful business. This course offers Exercises to help you apply what you learn to your own idea, and offers lectures that include: The Life Cycle of a Business, Market?, What is a Business Model?, and more.

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    You can find more information about this Udemy course, here.

    5. How to Build a StartUp

    Join 287,000 students, and prepare yourself to start an awesome course!

    What do you get from this course?

    • Actively listening and engaging your customers to find out what exactly they want in your product and how you should deliver it to them
    • Gathering, evaluating and using customer feedback to make your product, marketing and business model stronger
    • Engaging your customers through the three phases of the customer relationship management lifecycle: get, keep, and grow
    • Identifying key resources, partners, activities, and distribution channels required to deliver your product to your customer
    • Calculating your direct and indirect costs for delivering your product

    If that is not enough to interest you, Steve Blank as an instructor may give you the jolt you need to explore this free course!

    Steve Blank

      6. CodeAcademy

      I am currently a student of Code Academy, and it is a great course for anyone interested in learning how to create a website from scratch. Whether you would like to offer your clients more services, are interested in exploring a career as a freelancer, or would just like to explore a new hobby.

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      Even the mayor of New York has had nothing but great things to say about Code Academy!

      For more information about this de Blasio endorsed course, Click Here

      7. Think Digital

      Understanding Social Media as an Entrepreneur can only be a benefit.  Think Digital teaches you how to leverage the power of social media, to gain more traffic, more customers, more clicks, more shares, more purchases and more involvement in a shorter period of time.

      Register NOW

      8. Hubspot Academy

      This free program from HubSpot is great for CEO’s, Entrepreneurs and students and prepares you to start a business online. Take advantage of digital marketing today and gain a better understanding of website optimization, landing pages and lead nurturing.

      Not only do you get a certificate, but a badge that you can share on your website, LinkedIn page or Email Signature.

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      Get Started

      9. Startup Engineering

      Startup Engineering is a 12-week course for the Techpreneur.  By the end of this course you will have the skills to build a tech startup from the ground up.  Taught by Stanford’s Balaji Srinivasan and Vijay Pande, you will build a command line application, expose it as a web service, and create an HTML5 mobile app.

      For more information, visit Coursera

      10. Design Thinking for Business Innovation

      Approach the world like a creative, preparing yourself to approach business with the same process, and tools that the best creative minds use to build innovative brands.

      Though designing as a craft requires years of dedicated education and talent to master, Design Thinking as a problem solving approach does not.

      Get Started

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      Featured photo credit: Viktor Hanacek via picjumbo.com

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      1 7 Effective Ways To Motivate Employees in 2021 2 How a Project Management Mindset Boosts Your Productivity 3 5 Values of an Effective Leader 4 How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them 5 The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

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      Last Updated on July 21, 2021

      The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

      The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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      No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

      Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

      Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

      A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

      Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

      In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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      From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

      A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

      For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

      This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

      The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

      That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

      Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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      The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

      Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

      But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

      The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

      The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

      A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

      For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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      But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

      If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

      For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

      These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

      For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

      How to Make a Reminder Works for You

      Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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      Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

      Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

      My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

      Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

      I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

      More on Building Habits

      Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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      Reference

      [1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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