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Race Against The Clock: 15 Time-Management Lessons Should Be Learnt In Our 20s

Race Against The Clock: 15 Time-Management Lessons Should Be Learnt In Our 20s

Time management means getting the right things done, not more things done. It’s about identifying the goals that are most important right now and the most efficient ways to accomplish those goals. Here are 15 lessons to accomplish more goals in your entry-level job.

1. You can’t possibly get everything done on your To-Do List, so stop trying.

It’s a tough reality to come to terms with but a necessary one, especially for professionals working in a fast-paced environment. By simply understanding that you can’t do it all, you’ll bypass unnecessary stress and be more equipped to check off the most important items from your list.

2. Learning how to prioritize is key.

When under the gun, workforce newbies need to learn how to identify which tasks directly contribute to fulfilling immediate corporate goals – like arranging a meeting with a prospect – and which ones – like organizing files – can be reserved for a less strenuous week.

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3. No two brains are alike.

People listen and hear things differently, which always leads to communication issues and misunderstandings, ultimately contributing to lost productivity. When given directives, repeat what you understand back to your boss to make sure that you are both on the same page. Also, try taking a workplace behavioral assessment – they work wonders for understanding different communication styles and how to approach them.

4. By knowing when to multitask, you minimize the risk of shotty work.

We’ve been taught that multi-tasking is a crucial soft skill. But the truth is working several complex projects simultaneously can have disastrous effects on the brain. Cognitive ability is best when spent on one task at a time. While it’s okay to multitask sometimes, many projects require your full attention. A good worker knows when it’s okay to take a phone call while finishing up an email, and when he needs to close himself off from the world to finish a proposal for a client.

5. Being a workaholic isn’t always a good thing.

Taking the time to step away from your work and relax can be the perfect medicine for an overloaded brain. When faced with a desk piled mile-high with paperwork or up against a difficult problem, sometimes it’s best (for your productivity levels and your sanity) to take a deep breath and come back to it with fresh eyes.

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6. More hours do not equal more productivity.

I’m sure you’ve heard all about the decline of the 9-5 worker. Companies have been embracing flexible work hours and remote work options to appeal to the millennial generation. Studies show that people work smarter and better when they’re judged on the outcomes of their projects rather than the time they spend doing them.

7. Coming to terms with your own limits makes you a pro.

Some people lack organizational skills and are bogged down at the end of the week by an office that appears to have encountered a tornado. Others are so detail-oriented that the bigger picture often escapes them. Whatever your limits are, figure them out soon and own them – not everyone’s perfect. What makes someone successful is how he or she responds and deals with inadequacies.

8. Inhale today’s potential and exhale yesterday’s failures.

You’ve heard the expression, “Don’t bring your emotions to work.” Well here it is again. Beating yourself up over a bad performance review or a fight with a friend will surely put a damper on your work ethic. I know it’s easier said than done, but try to view each new day as a new opportunity.

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9. There’s a reason why successful people always ask, “What’s the point?”

Great leaders don’t have time to take every meeting that comes their way or seize each and every opportunity. They achieve their goals by ensuring that everything they do is purposeful and results-oriented.

10. We deal better with hard deadlines.

Deadlines help keep us on track and organized. Assigning someone with an open-ended task always leads to chaos, missed communications, and frustrated tones in the office. People work best when they know exactly what they need to do and when it needs to get it done by.

11. Knowing your “peak hours” will enhance productivity.

Everyone works to a different tune. It’s important to become self aware by studying your own behavior to find out what times during the day you work best. Are you a night owl or an early bird? If you love watching the sunrise, arrange to work on strenuous projects in the a.m. and reserve easy stuff for later on.

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12. Delegating doesn’t make you lazy – it makes you efficient.

Young workers and die-hard perfectionists often shy away from delegating tasks to others. If your swamped with a project or you run into an issue that’s not within your jurisdiction, ask for help. Trying to be superman and accomplish everything will lead to mistakes and wasted time.

13. Procrastinating is ok…sometimes.

Everyone has parts of their job they absolutely hate. Whether it’s spreadsheets or public speaking, we all have one. Ease into your work by accomplishing the tasks you enjoy most first. By the time you get to those spreadsheets, you’ll be “in the zone” and more likely to crush those insufferable responsibilities.

14. Tracking your time is the best way to hold yourself accountable.

By logging the time you spend on certain projects throughout the day, you can see how your time is really being spent. People are always surprised by how often distractions and white noise get them off track.

15. There’s always a way.

If you don’t trust your social media addiction and are on a tight deadline, find an app that will hold you accountable. The Cold Turkey app, for example, blocks Internet access for a specified amount of time so you have no other choice but to get work done.

Featured photo credit: VFS Digital Design via flickr.com

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Last Updated on May 24, 2019

How to Be Productive at Home and Make Every Day a Productive Day

How to Be Productive at Home and Make Every Day a Productive Day

If you’ve ever wondered how to be productive at home or how you could possibly have a more productive day, look no further.

Below you’ll find six easy tips that will help you make the most out of your time:

1. Create a Good Morning Routine

One of the best ways to start your day is to get up early and eat a healthy breakfast.

CEOs and other successful people have similar morning routines, which include exercising and quickly scanning their inboxes to find the most urgent tasks.[1]

You can also try writing first thing in the morning to warm up your brain[2] (750 words will help with that). But no matter what you choose to do, remember to create good morning habits so that you can have a more productive day.

If you aren’t sure how to make morning routine work for you, this guide will help you:

The Ultimate Morning Routine to Make You Happy And Productive All Day

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2. Prioritize

Sometimes we can’t have a productive day because we just don’t know where to start. When that’s the case, the most simple solution is to list everything you need to get accomplished, then prioritize these tasks based on importance and urgency.

Week Plan is a simple web app that will help you prioritize your week using the Covey time management grid. Here’s an example of it:[3]

    If you get the most pressing and important items done first, you will be able to be more productive while keeping stress levels down.

    Lifehack’s CEO, Leon, also has great advice on how to prioritize. Take a look at this article to learn more about it:

    How to Prioritize Right in 10 Minutes and Work 10X Faster

    3. Focus on One Thing at a Time

    One of the biggest killers of productivity is distractions. Whether it be noise or thoughts or games, distractions are a barrier to any productive day. That’s why it’s important to know where and when you work best.

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    Need a little background noise to keep you on track? Try working in a coffee shop.

    Can’t stand to hear even the ticking of a clock while writing? Go to a library and put in your headphones.

    Don’t be afraid to utilize technology to make the best of your time. Sites like [email protected] and Simply Noise can help keep you focused and productive all day long.

    And here’s some great apps to help you focus: 10 Online Apps for Better Focus

    4. Take Breaks

    Focusing, however, can drain a lot of energy and too much of it at once can quickly turn your productive day unproductive.

    To reduce mental fatigue while staying on task, try using the Pomodoro Technique. It requires working on a task for 25 minutes, then taking a short break before another 25 minute session.

    After four “pomodoro sessions,” be sure to take a longer break to rest and reflect.

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    I like to work in 25 and 5 minute increments, but you should find out what works best for you.

    5. Manage Your Time Effectively

    A learning strategies consultant once told me that there is no such thing as free time, only unstructured time.

    How do you know when exactly you have free time?

    By using the RescueTime app, you can see when you have free time, when you are productive, and when you actually waste time.

    With this data, you can better plan out your day and keep yourself on track.

    Moreover, you can increase the quality of low-intensity time. For example, reading the news while exercising or listening to meeting notes while cooking. Many of the mundane tasks we routinely accomplish can be paired with other tasks that lead to an overall more productive day.

    A bonus tip, even your real free time can be used productively, find out how:

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    20 Productive Ways to Use Your Free Time

    6. Celebrate and Reflect

    No matter how you execute a productive day, make sure to take time and celebrate what you’ve accomplished. It’s important to reward yourself so that you can continue doing great work. Plus, a reward system is an incredible motivator.

    Additionally, you should reflect on your day in order to find out what worked and what didn’t. Reflection not only increases future productivity, but also gives your brain time to decompress and de-stress.

    Try these 10 questions for daily self reflection.

    More Articles About Daily Productivity

    Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

    Reference

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