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12 Ways To Instill Your Kid With An Entrepreneurial Mindset

12 Ways To Instill Your Kid With An Entrepreneurial Mindset

Misfit, oddball, geek, nerd, outcast, and misunderstood rebel, these are some of the terms used to describe future entrepreneurs. So parents, I wouldn’t be too worried if your child isn’t popular and hanging with the cool kids…yet.

Chances are they’re already in line to be the next Mark Zuckerberg (Facebook founder) or Do Won Chang (Forever 21 founder). Both of these entrepreneurs started from very unpopular beginnings. Zuckerberg still doesn’t let being perceived negatively get in the way of his success:

“This is a perverse thing, personally, but I would rather be in the cycle where people are underestimating us. It gives us latitude to go out and make big bets that excite and amaze people.” – Mark Zuckerberg

You’ll find that it takes only simple tweaks in everyday behavior to cultivate an entrepreneurial mindset in your kids.

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1. Never say: “Do as I say, don’t do as I do”

It is far better to lead by example. As a child, I heard, “Do as I say, don’t do as I do” with my mother’s index finger wagging in my face countless times. In theory, it sounds like it might work and encourage your child to listen to your recommendations and do better. But it’s an illogical approach when the laws of nurture come into play. Children are far more likely to imitate your actions rather than your noble speech. My 3-year-old daughter asked me for her own desk in my home office. It isn’t because desks are cool among 3-year-old’s; you know what is cool? Being like mommy.

2. Create An Environment Of Play

When did life get so serious? When did we stop playing in puddles, laughing at randomness, being silly because the mood struck us? Don’t take that away from your kids. Let them build a fort in the Ikea-chic living room. Let them imagine the pencil has magic powers and can turn you into a parrot. (Be the freakin’ parrot!) Part of being an entrepreneur is about creating, questioning, exploring, and playing. That’s how ideas are born and life becomes a majestic board of possibilities. Never let them stop playing with possibilities. Ever.

3. Manage What They Consume

Create more, consume less. In our savvy technology world, anything you can imagine is available on an iPad. Utilize the parent-protected feature to only provide them with access to content that will teach them, develop their thinking, and inspire them to be their best self. Focus on games that represent leadership and critical thinking, and promote kindness and being responsible. Visuals that encourage positive self-image and self-regard are also important. If your child is anything like my kid, they’re probably on some type of device a lot. Create a bubble and regulate their media consumption. Safeguard what filters in, and you’ll always be proud of what filters out.

4. Interrupt Negative Self-Talk

The thing we usually cannot manage is what our children hear outside of the home and away from our guidance. This is where they can pick up foreign habits that stray from the path we would most prefer them to be on. Not everyone around us will or wants to be an entrepreneur. And the journey of entrepreneurship requires a person who has thick skin, even when faced with their own self-talk.(Don’t we tend to be our own worst enemy?) The “I am dumb”, “I always mess up” and “I suck at this” self-talk will creep into your child’s vocabulary. Don’t let too much time pass before you interrupt their negative self-talk. Interject with “Remember the time you hit that home run?” Or “You did awesome when you got a B+ on your spelling test.” Replace the negative statements with positive wins they recently had. This reminds them of how phenomenal they really are and re-frames their outlook on the current situation. It reminds them that their situation is only temporary. Their awesomeness isn’t.

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5. Actively Remind them to be Grateful

Our mental space often gets crowded with all the things we think that we want. “I want…I want…I want…” How many times you’ve heard your kids say this over and over? Think of when they were asking for the brand new toy that came out last week or asking to watch the movie Frozen another 101 times. Always wanting without being thankful for what they already have sets our children up to expect immediate gratification. You and I both know that there is no such thing as getting instant results when running a business. It takes time, months…even years to see any positive results sometimes. A simple reminder of all we have to be thankful for in this present moment creates a conscious child and one who is open to receiving more in time.

6. Make Rigid Routine Days Mandatory

You may be thinking how does this create an entrepreneurial mindset? Don’t entrepreneurs purposefully avoid routine? That’s why entrepreneurs don’t have jobs, right? Not true. Part of being an entrepreneur is learning to do the boring stuff…repeatedly. That’s how great minds are built, like Mark Cuban, Steve Jobs, and Oprah. Nobody ever talks about all the times they had to re-write their business plan, set up mundane systems and master a skill before they began to see success. There’s one simple reason for is: there’s nothing sexy about routine. But a routine must be mastered. This creates discipline and yield results. As time passes, due to our purposefully scheduled days focused on mastering a craft, we are eventually able to live free from such a rigid routine.

7. Encouraging Curiosity and Asking Questions

In this case, lack of curiosity…killed dreams. To ask why and question the status quo is what entrepreneurship is built on. The greatest entrepreneurs have asked “Why not?” when facing risks or unconventional choices. Have your children explore places, sights and sounds. Encourage them to try new foods, and to meet different and interesting people. When dancing with the idea of doing something out of their comfort zone, allow them the freedom to ask “how”, “what”, “who”, “where”, “when”- and most importantly…”why not?”

“Others have seen what is and asked why. I have seen what could be and asked why not.” – Pablo Picasso

8. Encourage Independence From Diaper Years

If you’re reading this and you’re one of those parents who love to coddle their child. You’re not going to like this one…not one bit. Here goes: coddling sets them up for dependency and there is nothing entrepreneurial about that. Allow them to get their own utensils before dinner, set the table even. It teaches them responsibility. Let them correct their misbehavior before you tell them that they’re wrong. It teaches them accountability. Don’t rush to kiss their boo-boos after a fall. It teaches them how to get back up…on their own. We as parents won’t always be there and they will have to learn how to conquer the jungle of life independently eventually. Be there to support them, the whole way- just from a distance.

9. Never Teach Them Ugly Ideas About Money

The rich are evil”, “The rich do whatever it takes to get what they want”, “The rich profit off of the poor”. These ugly lessons are false and will block your child from making money from any future business ventures. They’ll get as far as that belief will take them- just enough to satisfy their basic needs. Entrepreneurship is about being in a position to help others. If you’re not in a happy financial situation, chances are you cannot help anyone else but yourself. Sure, there are a few bad apples that reach financial success but it doesn’t outweigh the countless others who don’t fit that description.They continue to support communities and the creation of positive technological advances because they are in a financial position to do so.

10. Let Them Have A J.O.B.

This goes against everything an entrepreneur stands for. A job! Yuck. But we all start somewhere. How will our children learn how to do things differently, without first knowing how it’s done? Then they have the chance to realize they can do it better…much better. Give them small tasks to do each day around the house. Let them pick up a paper route. Have them learn the fundamentals of hard work! This only prepares them for the incredible work involved when running your own business.

11. Answer Their Questions With A Question

Don’t give up answers so easily.

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Why do I have to go to school?” Your response: “You tell me, why?

How do stars stay up in the sky? Your response: “You tell me, how?”

What makes the TV work?” Your response: “I’m not sure…you tell me, what makes it work?

This allows them to THINK about their question and allow critical thoughts to flow. When we easily hand over the answers, what opportunity do they have to be resourceful? This doesn’t encourage them to formulate their own reasoning around why things happen, how things work, and what things are. It also doesn’t offer them the chance to come up with their own conclusions. Having a discussion around their findings is one of the best gifts you can give them.

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12. Pour On The Hugs and Kisses

This is probably the most important tool in your arsenal. An emotionally stable child is going to take failure a lot better, get back up a lot faster, and have higher self-confidence. They will know without a shadow of a doubt, they can be and do whatever they’ve set their mind to. It just takes one person to believe in them…just one. After that, not even the sky’s the limit.

Soar my little eagle, soar.

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Published on November 7, 2018

How to Homeschool in the 21st Century (For All Types of Parents & Kids)

How to Homeschool in the 21st Century (For All Types of Parents & Kids)

In 2016, it was estimated that 1.7 million children were being homeschooled in the U.S, roughly 3.3% of all school-aged children.[1] Although this may not sound like a big portion of the population, the growth rate of homeschooling has been 7 to15% per year for the last two decades.

The burgeoning numbers are not a coincidence. There are tremendous benefits to homeschooling, including one-on-one teaching, adaptability to individual needs and learning styles, a safe learning environment, encouraging learning for knowledge rather than grades, and tailoring a curriculum to the child’s interests.

Is homeschooling something that you have been considering for your family? With all of the tools and resources available for homeschoolers in the 21st century, it may be easier than you think.

How to Homeschool (Getting Started)

After thinking it through, you’ve decided that homeschooling is the right step for you and your family. Now what? Here are the first things you should do to get your homeschooling journey started on the right track.

Figure Out the Laws

Homeschooling is regulated by the state, not the federal government. The first step is to find the current and accurate legal requirements mandated by your state in order to educate your child legally.[2]

The regulations can vary widely, from strict guidelines to no guidelines at all. However, don’t be overwhelmed by the legal jargon. There are many resources and local communities for homeschooling families that can help you figure out the logistics.

Decide on an Approach

Every child’s needs are different. This is your chance to choose the homeschooling style or combination of styles that best fits your child’s learning style and interests. A brief description of seven different homeschooling methods are listed below.

Supplies/Resources

Often times, purchasing a homeschooling curriculum is done too early in the planning process, resulting in buyer’s remorse.

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A curriculum is not always needed for homeschooling, and other types of free or less structured resources are readily available.

Find a Community

Getting connected with a community of homeschoolers is one of the most important parts of building a successful and thriving homeschool environment for your kids.

Look for communities online for virtual support or a local group that you and your kids can interact with. Partnering with others fosters better socialization skills for the students and provides opportunities for field trips, classes, and outings that wouldn’t have otherwise been a part of the homeschooling experience.

7 Different Homeschooling Methods

1. School-At-Home

Also known as Traditional homeschool, School-At-Home uses essentially the same curriculum as the local private or public school but at home.

The lessons can be completed independently, but more commonly, they are administered by a parent or a teacher-facilitated online school.

  • Benefits: formal standards, wide selection of curricula, same pace as peers, short-term friendly
  • Drawbacks: expensive, inflexible, time consuming, parent can get easily burnt out
  • Resources: K12, Time4Learning, Abeka

2. Classical

One of the most popular homeschooling methods used, it borrows educational practices from Ancient Greece and Rome. Subject areas are studied chronologically so that students can understand the consequence of ideas over time.

Socratic dialogue fosters effective discussions and debate to achieve beyond mere comprehension. There is often a strong emphasis on Great Books[3] as well as Greek and Latin.

3. Unit Studies

Rather than breaking up education into subjects, unit studies approach each topic as a whole, studying it from the perspective of each subject area.

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For example, a unit study about animals could include reading books about animals, learning about the classification of animals, figuring out which animals live on which continents, etc. This method is often used as a technique in other more comprehensive educational methodologies.

  • Benefits: promotes thinking about concepts as a whole, not monotonous or redundant, student-directed, bolsters weaker subject areas, beneficial for teaching multi-age students
  • Drawbacks: incomplete, knowledge gaps, curriculum-dependent
  • Resources: Unit Study, Unit Studies, Unit Studies Made Easy, Konos

4. Charlotte Mason

This Christian homeschooling style utilizes shorts periods of study (15-20 minute max for elementary, 45 minute max for high school), along with nature walks and history portfolios.

Students are encouraged to practice observation, memorization, and narration often. With a focus on “living books” (stories with heroes, life lessons, socio-ethical implications), reading plays a big role in this student-paced teaching style.

5. Montessori

Maria Montessori developed this method through working with special needs children in the early 20th century.

With a primary focus on the student setting the pace and indirect instruction from the teacher, this approach includes free movement, large unstructured time blocks (up to 3 hours), multi-grade classes, and individualized learning plans based on interests.

6. Unschooling

Unschooling is a learning model largely based on the work of John Holt.[4] The teaching style focuses mainly on the students’ interests, putting priority on experiential, activity-based, and learn as you go approaches.

For basic skills such as reading, writing, and math, a systematic technique is employed, but testing and evaluations are typically not utilized. Teachers, in general, play more of a facilitator role.

7. Eclectic/Relaxed

As the most popular method of homeschool, eclectic homeschooling is child-directed, resourceful, and non-curriculum based.

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Parents can sample any combination of homeschooling methods and styles or resources. One growing sector of eclectic homeschooling combines part homeschooling with part traditional schooling.

How to Facilitate Homeschooling with Technology

One of the reasons homeschooling is more feasible than ever before is due to the accessibility of tools and resources to enhance the learning process.

Email

Email is a tool that has really stood the test of time. Invented in 1972, it is still used today as a primary means of communicating on the Internet.

It is a great way to share assignments, links, and videos between parent and student.

Google Drive/Calendar

Google Drive offers a multitude of essential programs that can come in handy for homeschoolers, such as Docs, Sheets, Slides, and more.

With its sharing capabilities, easy accessibility, and auto-save ability, it’s easier than ever to organize and complete assignments. It will improve students’ writing and typing skills, as well as eliminate the need for paper.

Google Calendar is an excellent tool for tracking assignment due dates, planning field trips and activities, and developing time management skills.

Ebooks

Rather than invest in physical copies of books, ebooks are a wonderful option for saving money and space. There are plenty of places that offer a free or paid subscription to a wide selection of ebooks:

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E-Courses

When a structured curriculum is necessary for teaching a certain topic, an e-course is the way to go.

From watercolors to calculus, there are e-courses available about almost everything. Including different teaching styles that vary from the parents will encourage students to learn in different ways.

The visual and auditory stimulation will also be beneficial in helping students understand and retain the concepts being taught.

Some recommendations:

Youtube

Youtube is not just a platform for music videos and cats doing funny things. There are a number of Youtube channels that produce quality educational videos, free of charge.

Creating a playlist of videos for various topics is a great way to supplement a homeschool education.

Some recommendations:

Final Thoughts

Homeschooling in the current age looks much different than it did ten years ago. There are more options and more flexibility when it comes to educating kids at home.

Don’t be overwhelmed by the idea of homeschooling your children if it could make a positive impact on your family.

Featured photo credit: Hal Gatewood via unsplash.com

Reference

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