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7 Simple Steps to Improve Your Financial Management Skills

7 Simple Steps to Improve Your Financial Management Skills

Have you ever wondered why our educational system doesn’t teach life skills? I have. I teach communication at the university level, but by the time the students get into my class, their habits are pretty much already formed—and many of them are bad ones.

For example, maybe they saw their parents yell and scream at each other. Or maybe they avoided conflict altogether. These are not good skills to adopt. It’s really sad that they didn’t learn better life skills while they were in school.

Another life skill we weren’t taught in school is how to handle money. Once again, we learn from how our parents handled money. Were they spenders? Were they savers? Did they teach you invest? Did they teach you about the stock market or how to save for retirement? I’m betting the answer is “no” for most of us.

Just because you didn’t learn good financial skills in school doesn’t mean that you can’t learn them now. Here are some tips you can follow to get better at managing money.

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1. Make a budget—and stick to it.

Do you know where all your money goes? Do you know how much money you spend on things like going out to eat, seeing a movie, buying beer, or purchasing clothes? Most people don’t. Are you one of those people who just prays every day that you don’t overdraw your bank account? If so, make your budget. Go back through your checkbook or bank statements for the last year and write down how much you spent in each category. You will probably be surprised at how much of your money is “wasted” on things you weren’t even aware of.

2. Be a conscious consumer.

When you go to the grocery store, do you have a list? Do you look at prices? Do you use coupons? There are many online resources and apps that can help you be more focused on what you are actually spending.

Don’t “sleep walk” through life. Be aware of every single cent you spend! When people don’t do that, their money tends to just evaporate. It takes a bit of effort to look for coupons, make lists, examine the prices at the stores where you shop, but it’s worth it in the long run. And, it makes a BIG difference.

3. Balance your checkbook.

I record everything I purchase. In fact, sometimes my friends make fun of me because I’m always whipping out my checkbook to record everything I spend whether it’s at Target, the gas station, the bowling alley, or pretty much anything else.

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These days, most people just rely on looking at their bank balance online. But if you only do that, then it allows you to not care what you are spending in the moment. But if you hold yourself accountable by recording everything, then you will not over-spend or overdraw your account.

4. Have a plan and a vision.

In order to accomplish anything, you have to have a plan, right? I mean, if you wanted to go to San Francisco but you didn’t have Mapquest or a GPS to calculate your route, you would never get there! Instead, you would just drive aimlessly into nowhere.

That metaphor is pretty much what happens to you when you don’t have a financial plan. You often ask yourself, “Where did that money go?” But if you have a plan and a budget (see #1), then you will know exactly where your money has gone.

5. Think like an investor.

As I said in the introduction, our educational system does not teach us anything about how to handle money—especially when it comes to how to grow it. But think about it. Did the wealthiest people in the world just save $500 a month and leave it at that? Of course not! They learned how to turn that $500 a month into $1,000. Then $10,000. Then $100,000. And so on. You get the point.

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You can’t expect to have a solid financial future if you’re not thinking about how to grow your money. So if you start to think like an investor, you’ll see your nest egg expand.

6. Work together with your partner/spouse on the same financial goals.

If you’re married or in a partnership where you share money, then you need to work together. Since I teach about relationships, I know that one of the biggest conflicts in relationships is money! Frequently, one person will be a saver, and the other will be a spender. This doesn’t work! So it’s important that both you and your partner get on the same page about your financial goals.

Sit down together and make your budget. Meet with a financial adviser so you can learn how to invest your money wisely. But if nothing else, you need to make sure that the two of you have the same goal and vision. And that you actually stick to it!

7. Commit to saving money.

Speaking of sticking to something, commitment is everything. You can’t do anything half-way. You can’t “sometimes” do something and “sometimes not.” You have to be consistent! You have to stay the course!

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It’s kind of like losing weight. If you only occasionally eat less and exercise more, you MIGHT lose some weight. But chances are, you’ll probably just go back to your old habits. So that’s why you need to commit to saving money and building your future. Otherwise, you might as well not even bother!

If our schools taught us these financial skills, then what I have talked about in this article might come naturally to us all. But for most of us, it doesn’t. But it’s not rocket science. It’s just like anything—if you want it badly enough, you will do it! If you want to make your financial situation better you can do it! But you just need to start with the decision to do so.

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Carol Morgan

Dr. Carol Morgan is the owner of HerSideHisSide.com, a communication professor, dating & relationship coach, TV personality, speaker, and author.

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Last Updated on July 10, 2020

The Definitive Guide to Get out of Debt Fast (and Forever)

The Definitive Guide to Get out of Debt Fast (and Forever)

Debt can feel crushing, like a weight that is always weighing you down. Looking at those numbers, it can feel as if you’ll never get out from under it. However, if you really want to learn how to get out of debt, it is possible with a great deal of focus and self-control.

Getting out of debt isn’t impossible. Like any big goal, all that it takes is an action plan to identify where you are and creating a plan to zero out your debt.

Identifying All of Your Debts

The first part of paying off your debt is getting a complete picture of what you owe. When you have everything written out in front of you, it makes it much easier to create an action plan. Depending on how much you owe, it might also help you realize it’s not as bad you might have originally thought.

Here’s how you can get started identifying your debts:

1. Own Your Debt

Before you start identifying all of your debts, take a moment to process that you have debt but want to get out of it.

Forgive yourself for any past mistakes, missed payments, or overspending. It might be painful to accept how much debt you have at first, but you must own it.

2. Make a Debt Tracker

It’s astonishing how few people ever created a tracker to understand their total debts. Most likely, it comes from not wanting to accept the guilt of having debt, but, if avoided, it can make it nearly impossible to get out of debt.

Open up a new Google or Microsoft Excel sheet and list out all of your debts. Start with the name of the creditor, interest rates, total balance, loan term length (if any), and the minimum amount due each payment. This will include student loans, credit cards, and any other type of debt owed.

3. Get Your Debt Number

Once you’ve made your debt tracker and taken the other steps, identify your total payoff number. This is crucial, as you will have a starting point and a clear goal that you are trying to achieve.

Prioritizing Your Debts

All debt is not created equal. It’s imperative to understand that there are different types of debt.

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1. Understand Bad and Good Debts

Bad debts are usually paying for things you want instead of always need. While there might be some emergencies that max out your credit cards, often times it’s excessive spending[1].

There are three main types of bad debt:

  • Credit Card Debt: The average American household owes over $16,000 in credit card debt!
  • Auto Loan Debt: According to CNBC , the average auto loan in the US is $30,032!
  • Consumer Loan Debt: Consumer loan debt isn’t as common as credit card and auto loan debt, but it’s still considered bad as interest rates are usually between 10-28%.

Good debt is identified as investments in your future. Here are three common types of good debt:

  • Student Loan Debt
  • Mortgage Loan
  • Business Loans

2. Decide Which Debt to Pay off First

Once you know each type of debt and their interest rates, you can begin to pay off debt quickly.

Focus on paying off bad debt first, regardless of if it is a credit card or auto loan. Start by paying off the loan with the highest interest rate first.

If you have several credit cards with different interest rates, you want to focus on the one with a higher APR. You will actually save more money by eliminating the card with the highest interest rate.

3. Don’t Pay the Minimum Amount

Paying the minimum amount digs you into a hole as interest rates will offset your payment. Even a small amount more than the minimum can help you pay off debt much faster.

Removing Obstacles to Pay off Debt Quickly

Creating a debt tracker and prioritizing a plan is simple, but avoiding temptation can be difficult.

1. Set a Reminder to Track Your Debt

“If you can’t measure it you can’t manage it.” -Peter Drucker

It’s so important to track your debt to ensure that you get it paid off quickly. Similar to working out and measuring your results, you need to track your debt constantly. Start with a weekly reminder, where you sign on and log your updated number. Did you increase, decrease, or stay the same?

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Regularly tracking your student loan balance can be incredibly motivating, as well. You will get a huge confidence boost each time you see your total debt amount decreases.

Set weekly and monthly goals so you can have short term wins and keep the momentum going.

2. Hide Your Credit Cards

If your biggest debt is credit cards, you need to eliminate temptation and remove them from your wallet.

Some people have gone to extreme measures by freezing their credit cards. Why? This would create an ice block around your card, which would require you to chip away at it slowly. This will give you time to think if it’s the best idea to buy that thing you’re about to buy.

3. Automate Everything

Willpower can be a huge downfall to paying off your debt. By automating your bills each month, you will ensure that willpower isn’t involved.

4. Plan Ahead

Getting out of debt will require some sacrifices, but with enough planning, you can make it work.

For example, if you know that you have a friend’s birthday or family dinner coming up, plan ahead for the costs. Whether you need to cut back on spending the week before, pick up a side job, or meet them after dinner, do what is needed.

5. Live Cheaply

The only way to get out of debt is to make some sacrifices on your spending habits. Find ways to save money each month so you can apply that amount to your outstanding debts. Here are some ways to save money each month:

  • Live with roommates
  • Cook dinners and prepare lunches for work instead of eating out
  • Cut cable and choose Netflix or Amazon Prime
  • Take public transit or bike to work

Finding the Lowest Interest Rates

The higher your interest rates, the harder (and longer) it will take you to pay off any debt.

If possible, you want to find ways to lower your interest rates to help get out of debt quickly. Here’s how you can get started:

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1. Maintain a High Credit Score

Your credit score will have a large impact on your ability to refinance your loans and receive a lower interest rate. If you have a low credit score, it’s unlikely you will be able to refinance your loans. Use these credit tips to increase and maintain an excellent score:

  • Never miss a payment
  • Don’t exceed 30% of your credit limit
  • Don’t sign up for more than one card at once
  • Limit hard inquires, like auto-loans and new credit cards
  • Monitor frequently with free credit-tracking software

2. Find Balance Transfer Offers

Start by opening a free account on credit.com. Credit.com offers you the chance to open a free account and see what type of balance transfer offers you can receive. Some of your existing credit cards might already have 0% or lower APR balance transfer offers available.

Contact each of your credit card providers to ask about lowering your rate for a one-time balance transfer offer[2].

If you do take advantage of this option, make sure that you use a balance transfer and not a cash advance. Cash advances have a ton of high interest fees (15-25%, depending on your credit card) and will only compound your debt problem.

How to Get Rid of Debt Forever

Setting up a plan, removing temptations, and getting the lowest interest rates is the first step to get out of debt.

1. Keep Monitoring and Adjusting

Once you have a plan, don’t get comfortable. Track your debt payoff plan and make the necessary adjustments when needed.

Monitor your credit scores with a free site like CreditKarma. The higher your credit score climbs, the more likely you will be to secure a new, lower-interest loan.

2. Earn More Money

There are only so many ways to save money. Instead of clipping another coupon or making sacrifices for your morning coffee, find ways to earn more money!

Think about it…it is much easier to find ways to earn an extra $1,000 per month than find $1,000 to cut from your budget.

Here are some examples of ways to earn more money:

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Talk to Your Boss

Have a conversation with your boss about current salary and/or commission rates. If you’re not satisfied or want a change, don’t be afraid to look around at other positions. Some of them might even have a student loan debt reimbursement plan!

Start a Side Hustle

This could be coaching students on the weekends, driving for Uber, or taking paid online surveys. There are tons of ways to make money outside your 9-5. Now that you have a clear plan to pay off your debts, you’ll be more motivated than ever to figure out creative new ways to earn money.

Build an Online Business

There are so many websites and blogs that earn money from ads, affiliates, and other online products. Find your niche and get started.

3. Celebrate Your Wins

As you progress in your debt payoff journey, don’t forget to celebrate your wins. You need to always reward yourself for the hard work and discipline that is required to get out of debt.

While you shouldn’t celebrate so big that it increases debt, make sure to factor in little rewards to keep you motivated.

4. Set New Financial Goals

Eventually, with a plan and these steps, you can rid yourself of your debt. Once you do, make sure to celebrate your monumental achievement, but don’t stop there.

Now, you can focus on acquiring wealth and increasing your net worth. Set new financial goals so you have a new target to aim toward. Here’s how to set financial goals and actually meet them.

These could be anything now that you are debt free! Think about where you want to travel, buying your first home, or saving for your future retirement. Just like before, make sure that your goals are specific, measurable, and achievable.

Conclusion

Congrats, you can now set a plan in motion to finally pay off your debt quickly (and hopefully forever)!

Remember, if you want to get out of debt quickly, it’s not always easy. Just like any big goal, there will be sacrifices, challenges, and problems to overcome.

More Tips on Getting out of Debt

Featured photo credit: Pepi Stojanovski via unsplash.com

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