Advertising
Advertising

18 Things College Students Should Do Before Graduation

18 Things College Students Should Do Before Graduation

It’s over before you know it. Suddenly, the four (or more) years you spent as a college student have come to an end, and you have walked across that stage, picked up your diploma, packed up your things, and are leaving permanently.

Within the next few weeks or months, you will probably still long for that campus life, and you will come to have some regrets about the things you could have done but didn’t.

Advertising

If you are in college now, reduce that list of regrets by developing your own personal bucket list of the things you will definitely do before graduation.

Advertising

Focus on personal development

College is definitely a time for new experiences and experimentation, and it should be much more than just about classes, grades, and parties. At some point, you have to enter the adult world with some values and beliefs about yourself. Here are some ways to develop you:

Advertising

  1. Take the Gallup Strength Finder Test. It is online and not expensive. You will be asked to choose between pairs of descriptors, and your results will provide a list of five strengths. Typical results include whether you are a good communicator, whether you are a solid decision-maker, and whether you are short-term or long-term focused. This is good information to have as you think about your major and what areas you may still need to develop. Jullian Gordon, MBA graduate from Stanford, who left his career to become a work-life balance coach states that if he had “listened” to the results of this test, he would not have wasted the years he did pursuing money and work he disliked.
  2. Read at least four inspirational/personal development books. Check out such titles as: The Success Principles, The Greatest Salesman in the World, Rich Dad-Poor Dad; Fish; Stay Hungry-Stay Foolish, and Who Moved My Cheese?
  3. Go to a meeting or attend an event of a group that is very different from you. For example, one sponsored by Muslim or African students if you are a typical WASP American.
  4. Start a blog about an interest. Are you into physical fitness or diet? Are you an expert on ways to freelance and make money while in college? Pick your pleasure and just do it!
  5. Choose something you have never been able to do and master it. For me, of all silly things, it was juggling. I was such a klutz and never able to get the eye-hand coordination thing down. Once I mastered it, however, I felt like I could almost do anything if my will was strong enough!
  6. Sit in on a class just because it is interesting. There is an amazing freedom when you don’t have to take notes or study for a test–just sit and absorb. I sat in on an abnormal psychology class and was completely mesmerized by the professor and the content.

Start preparing for your intended career

  1. Join a club or two on campus and work to get a leadership position. This looks great on a resume, and you will learn a lot.
  2. Beg, beg, beg for an internship, even if it is only for a few hours a week and you are not doing it for any credit. Just getting the experience and being able to list it on your resume is worth it. I tried for a year to get a radio station to take me on. Finally, I volunteered to be their “go-for,” running little errands, getting coffee, taking lunch orders, etc. Eventually, I got to do some worthwhile things, and I learned a lot about the business.
  3. Start making notes about what you want on that resume, and develop a portfolio if it will be relevant to your job search.
  4. Think seriously about at least a semester abroad, even if you have to borrow to do it. This is a big plus when you begin a job search.

Have some fun

  1. Crash a party where you know no one and make at least one new friend.
  2. Abuse your student ID discounts as much as possible.
  3. Dance on a table somewhere, and make certain someone gets a picture!
  4. Cut classes the first really warm day of each year–-get some sun and your favorite beverages. Make it a tradition, and call it National F— Off Day.
  5. Sneak into someplace on campus that is restricted.
  6. Throw a party and give a prize to the person who can bring the most unique/crazy item.
  7. Dress in a costume even though it is not Halloween and attend classes.

Find a passion that does good

  1. Volunteer in some capacity. Do something that really tugs at your heart strings. Maybe it is working with abused animals or children; maybe it is building houses for Habitat for Humanity; perhaps it is tutoring inner-city kids or becoming a Big Brother or Sister. Experience that great feeling of making someone else’s life richer for you being in it.

This list is just a start. You will probably find many other things in each category to fill your bucket list. Go for it–every minute of it!

Featured photo credit: College of DuPage 2014 Commencement Ceremony 65/COD Newsroom via flickr.com

Advertising

More by this author

Really amazing websites for freshman year 7 Awesome Websites to Plan Your Freshman Year Top 10 Colleges for Low-Income Students teacher and student, top amazing tools for teachers 2016 15 Incredible Tech Tools For Teachers To Use In 2016 C-3PO tiny robot Star Wars Technologies That Are Now in Our Everyday Lives 11 Best Colleges In America You Need To Know

Trending in Leisure

1 The 5-minute Guide to Meditation: Anywhere, Anytime 2 How to Quit Your Job and Travel the World After 40 3 The 25 Best Self Improvement Books to Read No Matter How Old You Are 4 25 Truly Amazing Places To Visit Before You Die 5 30 Fun Things to Do at Home

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

Advertising

3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

Advertising

6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

Advertising

9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

Advertising

Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

Read Next