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No One with the Wanderlust Gene Should Miss Any of These 20 Books

No One with the Wanderlust Gene Should Miss Any of These 20 Books

Do you have the wanderlust gene? A good book can make you feel like you’re a million miles away. A great book can even inspire you to travel to new destinations and cities.

If you have the wanderlust gene, check out 20 uplifting books that will help your mind travel to exciting and beautiful new locations — even if you can’t.

1. The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

    An uplifting story about following your dreams, The Alchemist is one of the most read wanderlust books ever. The book follows the journey of a young shepherd boy from Spain to Egypt.

    2. Stamboul Train by Graham Greene

    Stamboul Train by Graham Greene

      First published in 1932, this thriller takes place aboard the Orient Express as it travels through Europe. If you like murder mysteries, politics and wanderlust, this is the perfect book for you.

      3. Istanbul: Memories and the City by Orhan Pamuk

      Istanbul Memories and the City

        Orhan Pamuk was born and still lives in Istanbul. Actually, he still lives in the apartment building he was raised in. Read this for a fascinating and beautiful insight into his life in Istanbul.

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        4. Life of Pi by Yann Martel

        Life of Pi by Yann Martel

          In this magical book, the son of a zookeeper finds himself stranded at sea with a hyena, a tiger, an orangutan and a zebra. This is an interesting introspective look at fantasy and religion — and the truths we tell ourselves.

          5. My Documents by Alejandro Zambra

          My Documents by Alejandro Zambra

            This interesting book is a series of short stories documenting Chilean life during and after Pinochet’s regime. This book is a real page-turner!

            6. A Field Guide to Getting Lost by Rebecca Solnit

            A Field Guide to Getting Lost by Rebecca Solnit

              This thought-provoking book combines history, travel, philosophy, and memoir together to create an original and unique read.

              7. The Paris Wife by Paula McLain

              The Paris Wife by Paula McLain

                The Paris Wife covers the fascinating relationship between Ernest Hemingway and his wife Hadley, as well as the beautiful city of Paris where they reside.

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                8. The Scapegoat by Daphne du Maurier

                The Scapegoat by Daphne du Maurier

                  The Scapegoat is an interesting read about an English man and a French aristocrat who switch places after a random meeting in a railway station.

                  9. Travels with Charley: In Search of America by John Steinbeck

                  Travels with Charley In Search of America by John Steinbeck

                    In 1960, John Steinbeck decided to go out and rediscover his homeland in a truck, accompanied by only one living thing – his dog, Charley. An enjoyable read that you just can’t put down.

                    10. Black Lamb and Grey Falcon by Rebecca West

                    Black Lamb and Grey Falcon by Rebecca West

                      Published in 1942, Black Lamb and Grey Falcon is universally noted as one of the best books written about the former state of Yugoslavia.

                      11. The Blue Sky by Galsan Tschinag

                      The Blue Sky by Galsan Tschinag

                        The Blue Sky is a fascinating read about Mongolia’s Altai Mountains, and how the local natives were forced into the modern world.

                        12. The Great Railway Bazaar by Paul Theroux

                        The Great Railway Bazaar by Paul Theroux

                          This book is Paul Theroux’s personal account of his journey through Asia, describing all of the places, sights, and cultures he experienced along his way.

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                          13. Up In the Air by Walter Kirn

                          Up In the Air by Walter Kirn

                            Up in the Air is about a “Career Transition Counselor” – a man who’s job is simply to fire people. Witty and perceptive, this book is a must-read. It was so adored and successful it was adapted into a motion picture starring George Clooney.

                            14. In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

                            In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

                              In Patagonia is a beautiful book describing a man’s travels to a remote country in search of a strange beast. Filled with incredibly descriptive imagery, this book will make you feel like you are a million miles away.

                              15. The Twenty-One Balloons by William Pene du Bois

                              The Twenty-One Balloons by William Pene du Bois

                                Winner of the Newberry Medal, this original book follows a professor as he flies to his imaginary island in his hot air balloon.

                                16. Notes from a Small Island by Bill Bryson

                                Notes from a Small Island by Bill Bryson

                                  Hilarious and smart, Notes from a Small Island follows an American moving back to America after living in Britain. According to poll viewers, this book is a very accurate representation of Britain.

                                  17. Shantaram: A Novel by Gregory David Roberts

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                                  Shantaram A Novel by Gregory David Roberts

                                    This fascinating book follows three people travelling through Bombay and it’s secret society of gangsters, prostitutes, and holy men.

                                    18. Homage to Catalonia by George Orwell

                                    Homage to Catalonia by George Orwell

                                      This classic book is a memoir of George Orwell’s experiences in the Spanish Civil War.

                                      19. On the Road by Jack Kerouac

                                      On the Road by Jack Kerouac

                                        Another classic, On The Road, follows a group of friends as they travel together across America during the 1950s and discover their own voices.

                                        20. The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway

                                        The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway

                                          In Ernest Hemingway’s first big novel, a team of expats leave Paris together to watch a bullfight in Spain.

                                          What did you think of this list? Share it with your friends who have the wanderlust gene to see what they think!

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                                          Amy Johnson

                                          Amy is a writer who blogs about relationships and lifestyle advice.

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                                          Last Updated on January 21, 2020

                                          The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

                                          The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

                                          Creating a vision for your life might seem like a frivolous, fantastical waste of time, but it’s not: creating a compelling vision of the life you want is actually one of the most effective strategies for achieving the life of your dreams. Perhaps the best way to look at the concept of a life vision is as a compass to help guide you to take the best actions and make the right choices that help propel you toward your best life.

                                          your vision of where or who you want to be is the greatest asset you have

                                            Why You Need a Vision

                                            Experts and life success stories support the idea that with a vision in mind, you are more likely to succeed far beyond what you could otherwise achieve without a clear vision. Think of crafting your life vision as mapping a path to your personal and professional dreams. Life satisfaction and personal happiness are within reach. The harsh reality is that if you don’t develop your own vision, you’ll allow other people and circumstances to direct the course of your life.

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                                            How to Create Your Life Vision

                                            Don’t expect a clear and well-defined vision overnight—envisioning your life and determining the course you will follow requires time, and reflection. You need to cultivate vision and perspective, and you also need to apply logic and planning for the practical application of your vision. Your best vision blossoms from your dreams, hopes, and aspirations. It will resonate with your values and ideals, and will generate energy and enthusiasm to help strengthen your commitment to explore the possibilities of your life.

                                            What Do You Want?

                                            The question sounds deceptively simple, but it’s often the most difficult to answer. Allowing yourself to explore your deepest desires can be very frightening. You may also not think you have the time to consider something as fanciful as what you want out of life, but it’s important to remind yourself that a life of fulfillment does not usually happen by chance, but by design.

                                            It’s helpful to ask some thought-provoking questions to help you discover the possibilities of what you want out of life. Consider every aspect of your life, personal and professional, tangible and intangible. Contemplate all the important areas, family and friends, career and success, health and quality of life, spiritual connection and personal growth, and don’t forget about fun and enjoyment.

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                                            Some tips to guide you:

                                            • Remember to ask why you want certain things
                                            • Think about what you want, not on what you don’t want.
                                            • Give yourself permission to dream.
                                            • Be creative. Consider ideas that you never thought possible.
                                            • Focus on your wishes, not what others expect of you.

                                            Some questions to start your exploration:

                                            • What really matters to you in life? Not what should matter, what does matter.
                                            • What would you like to have more of in your life?
                                            • Set aside money for a moment; what do you want in your career?
                                            • What are your secret passions and dreams?
                                            • What would bring more joy and happiness into your life?
                                            • What do you want your relationships to be like?
                                            • What qualities would you like to develop?
                                            • What are your values? What issues do you care about?
                                            • What are your talents? What’s special about you?
                                            • What would you most like to accomplish?
                                            • What would legacy would you like to leave behind?

                                            It may be helpful to write your thoughts down in a journal or creative vision board if you’re the creative type. Add your own questions, and ask others what they want out of life. Relax and make this exercise fun. You may want to set your answers aside for a while and come back to them later to see if any have changed or if you have anything to add.

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                                            What Would Your Best Life Look Like?

                                            Describe your ideal life in detail. Allow yourself to dream and imagine, and create a vivid picture. If you can’t visualize a picture, focus on how your best life would feel. If you find it difficult to envision your life 20 or 30 years from now, start with five years—even a few years into the future will give you a place to start. What you see may surprise you. Set aside preconceived notions. This is your chance to dream and fantasize.

                                            A few prompts to get you started:

                                            • What will you have accomplished already?
                                            • How will you feel about yourself?
                                            • What kind of people are in your life? How do you feel about them?
                                            • What does your ideal day look like?
                                            • Where are you? Where do you live? Think specifics, what city, state, or country, type of community, house or an apartment, style and atmosphere.
                                            • What would you be doing?
                                            • Are you with another person, a group of people, or are you by yourself?
                                            • How are you dressed?
                                            • What’s your state of mind? Happy or sad? Contented or frustrated?
                                            • What does your physical body look like? How do you feel about that?
                                            • Does your best life make you smile and make your heart sing? If it doesn’t, dig deeper, dream bigger.

                                            It’s important to focus on the result, or at least a way-point in your life. Don’t think about the process for getting there yet—that’s the next stepGive yourself permission to revisit this vision every day, even if only for a few minutes. Keep your vision alive and in the front of your mind.

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                                            Plan Backwards

                                            It may sound counter-intuitive to plan backwards rather than forwards, but when you’re planning your life from the end result, it’s often more useful to consider the last step and work your way back to the first. This is actually a valuable and practical strategy for making your vision a reality.

                                            • What’s the last thing that would’ve had to happen to achieve your best life?
                                            • What’s the most important choice you would’ve had to make?
                                            • What would you have needed to learn along the way?
                                            • What important actions would you have had to take?
                                            • What beliefs would you have needed to change?
                                            • What habits or behaviors would you have had to cultivate?
                                            • What type of support would you have had to enlist?
                                            • How long will it have taken you to realize your best life?
                                            • What steps or milestones would you have needed to reach along the way?

                                            Now it’s time to think about your first step, and the next step after that. Ponder the gap between where you are now and where you want to be in the future. It may seem impossible, but it’s quite achievable if you take it step-by-step.

                                            It’s important to revisit this vision from time to time. Don’t be surprised if your answers to the questions, your technicolor vision, and the resulting plans change. That can actually be a very good thing; as you change in unforeseeable ways, the best life you envision will change as well. For now, it’s important to use the process, create your vision, and take the first step towards making that vision a reality.

                                            Featured photo credit: Matt Noble via unsplash.com

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