Advertising
Advertising

No One with the Wanderlust Gene Should Miss Any of These 20 Books

No One with the Wanderlust Gene Should Miss Any of These 20 Books

Do you have the wanderlust gene? A good book can make you feel like you’re a million miles away. A great book can even inspire you to travel to new destinations and cities.

If you have the wanderlust gene, check out 20 uplifting books that will help your mind travel to exciting and beautiful new locations — even if you can’t.

1. The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

    An uplifting story about following your dreams, The Alchemist is one of the most read wanderlust books ever. The book follows the journey of a young shepherd boy from Spain to Egypt.

    2. Stamboul Train by Graham Greene

    Stamboul Train by Graham Greene

      First published in 1932, this thriller takes place aboard the Orient Express as it travels through Europe. If you like murder mysteries, politics and wanderlust, this is the perfect book for you.

      3. Istanbul: Memories and the City by Orhan Pamuk

      Istanbul Memories and the City

        Orhan Pamuk was born and still lives in Istanbul. Actually, he still lives in the apartment building he was raised in. Read this for a fascinating and beautiful insight into his life in Istanbul.

        Advertising

        4. Life of Pi by Yann Martel

        Life of Pi by Yann Martel

          In this magical book, the son of a zookeeper finds himself stranded at sea with a hyena, a tiger, an orangutan and a zebra. This is an interesting introspective look at fantasy and religion — and the truths we tell ourselves.

          5. My Documents by Alejandro Zambra

          My Documents by Alejandro Zambra

            This interesting book is a series of short stories documenting Chilean life during and after Pinochet’s regime. This book is a real page-turner!

            6. A Field Guide to Getting Lost by Rebecca Solnit

            A Field Guide to Getting Lost by Rebecca Solnit

              This thought-provoking book combines history, travel, philosophy, and memoir together to create an original and unique read.

              7. The Paris Wife by Paula McLain

              The Paris Wife by Paula McLain

                The Paris Wife covers the fascinating relationship between Ernest Hemingway and his wife Hadley, as well as the beautiful city of Paris where they reside.

                Advertising

                8. The Scapegoat by Daphne du Maurier

                The Scapegoat by Daphne du Maurier

                  The Scapegoat is an interesting read about an English man and a French aristocrat who switch places after a random meeting in a railway station.

                  9. Travels with Charley: In Search of America by John Steinbeck

                  Travels with Charley In Search of America by John Steinbeck

                    In 1960, John Steinbeck decided to go out and rediscover his homeland in a truck, accompanied by only one living thing – his dog, Charley. An enjoyable read that you just can’t put down.

                    10. Black Lamb and Grey Falcon by Rebecca West

                    Black Lamb and Grey Falcon by Rebecca West

                      Published in 1942, Black Lamb and Grey Falcon is universally noted as one of the best books written about the former state of Yugoslavia.

                      11. The Blue Sky by Galsan Tschinag

                      The Blue Sky by Galsan Tschinag

                        The Blue Sky is a fascinating read about Mongolia’s Altai Mountains, and how the local natives were forced into the modern world.

                        12. The Great Railway Bazaar by Paul Theroux

                        The Great Railway Bazaar by Paul Theroux

                          This book is Paul Theroux’s personal account of his journey through Asia, describing all of the places, sights, and cultures he experienced along his way.

                          Advertising

                          13. Up In the Air by Walter Kirn

                          Up In the Air by Walter Kirn

                            Up in the Air is about a “Career Transition Counselor” – a man who’s job is simply to fire people. Witty and perceptive, this book is a must-read. It was so adored and successful it was adapted into a motion picture starring George Clooney.

                            14. In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

                            In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

                              In Patagonia is a beautiful book describing a man’s travels to a remote country in search of a strange beast. Filled with incredibly descriptive imagery, this book will make you feel like you are a million miles away.

                              15. The Twenty-One Balloons by William Pene du Bois

                              The Twenty-One Balloons by William Pene du Bois

                                Winner of the Newberry Medal, this original book follows a professor as he flies to his imaginary island in his hot air balloon.

                                16. Notes from a Small Island by Bill Bryson

                                Notes from a Small Island by Bill Bryson

                                  Hilarious and smart, Notes from a Small Island follows an American moving back to America after living in Britain. According to poll viewers, this book is a very accurate representation of Britain.

                                  17. Shantaram: A Novel by Gregory David Roberts

                                  Advertising

                                  Shantaram A Novel by Gregory David Roberts

                                    This fascinating book follows three people travelling through Bombay and it’s secret society of gangsters, prostitutes, and holy men.

                                    18. Homage to Catalonia by George Orwell

                                    Homage to Catalonia by George Orwell

                                      This classic book is a memoir of George Orwell’s experiences in the Spanish Civil War.

                                      19. On the Road by Jack Kerouac

                                      On the Road by Jack Kerouac

                                        Another classic, On The Road, follows a group of friends as they travel together across America during the 1950s and discover their own voices.

                                        20. The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway

                                        The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway

                                          In Ernest Hemingway’s first big novel, a team of expats leave Paris together to watch a bullfight in Spain.

                                          What did you think of this list? Share it with your friends who have the wanderlust gene to see what they think!

                                          More by this author

                                          Amy Johnson

                                          Amy is a writer who blogs about relationships and lifestyle advice.

                                          10 Health Benefits Of Avocado If You Feel Trapped, Do These 9 Things To Take Your Life Back If You Feel Trapped, Do These 9 Things To Take Your Life Back This List of 50 Low-cost Hobbies Will Excite You Daily Routine of Successful People That Will Inspire You to Achieve More 15 Inspirational Weekend Activities to do by Yourself

                                          Trending in Leisure

                                          1 5 Best Free Websites To Learn Photography Skills Easily 2 World’s 30 Coolest And Most Unusual Hostels You Definitely Need To Visit 3 Beauty Hacks: 25 Smooth Shaving Tips for Women 4 25 Best Self Improvement Books to Read No Matter How Old You Are 5 30 Inspirational Songs that Keep You Motivated for Life

                                          Read Next

                                          Advertising
                                          Advertising
                                          Advertising

                                          Last Updated on September 16, 2019

                                          How to Stop Procrastinating: 11 Practical Ways for Procrastinators

                                          How to Stop Procrastinating: 11 Practical Ways for Procrastinators

                                          You have a deadline looming. However, instead of doing your work, you are fiddling with miscellaneous things like checking email, social media, watching videos, surfing blogs and forums. You know you should be working, but you just don’t feel like doing anything.

                                          We are all familiar with the procrastination phenomenon. When we procrastinate, we squander away our free time and put off important tasks we should be doing them till it’s too late. And when it is indeed too late, we panic and wish we got started earlier.

                                          The chronic procrastinators I know have spent years of their life looped in this cycle. Delaying, putting off things, slacking, hiding from work, facing work only when it’s unavoidable, then repeating this loop all over again. It’s a bad habit that eats us away and prevents us from achieving greater results in life.

                                          Don’t let procrastination take over your life. Here, I will share my personal steps on how to stop procrastinating. These 11 steps will definitely apply to you too:

                                          1. Break Your Work into Little Steps

                                          Part of the reason why we procrastinate is because subconsciously, we find the work too overwhelming for us. Break it down into little parts, then focus on one part at the time. If you still procrastinate on the task after breaking it down, then break it down even further. Soon, your task will be so simple that you will be thinking “gee, this is so simple that I might as well just do it now!”.

                                          For example, I’m currently writing a new book (on How to achieve anything in life). Book writing at its full scale is an enormous project and can be overwhelming. However, when I break it down into phases such as –

                                          Advertising

                                          • (1) Research
                                          • (2) Deciding the topic
                                          • (3) Creating the outline
                                          • (4) Drafting the content
                                          • (5) Writing Chapters #1 to #10,
                                          • (6) Revision
                                          • (7) etc.

                                          Suddenly it seems very manageable. What I do then is to focus on the immediate phase and get it done to my best ability, without thinking about the other phases. When it’s done, I move on to the next.

                                          2. Change Your Environment

                                          Different environments have different impact on our productivity. Look at your work desk and your room. Do they make you want to work or do they make you want to snuggle and sleep? If it’s the latter, you should look into changing your workspace.

                                          One thing to note is that an environment that makes us feel inspired before may lose its effect after a period of time. If that’s the case, then it’s time to change things around. Refer to Steps #2 and #3 of 13 Strategies To Jumpstart Your Productivity, which talks about revamping your environment and workspace.

                                          3. Create a Detailed Timeline with Specific Deadlines

                                          Having just 1 deadline for your work is like an invitation to procrastinate. That’s because we get the impression that we have time and keep pushing everything back, until it’s too late.

                                          Break down your project (see tip #1), then create an overall timeline with specific deadlines for each small task. This way, you know you have to finish each task by a certain date. Your timelines must be robust, too – i.e. if you don’t finish this by today, it’s going to jeopardize everything else you have planned after that. This way it creates the urgency to act.

                                          My goals are broken down into monthly, weekly, right down to the daily task lists, and the list is a call to action that I must accomplish this by the specified date, else my goals will be put off.

                                          Advertising

                                          Here’re more tips on setting deadlines: 22 Tips for Effective Deadlines

                                          4. Eliminate Your Procrastination Pit-Stops

                                          If you are procrastinating a little too much, maybe that’s because you make it easy to procrastinate.

                                          Identify your browser bookmarks that take up a lot of your time and shift them into a separate folder that is less accessible. Disable the automatic notification option in your email client. Get rid of the distractions around you.

                                          I know some people will out of the way and delete or deactivate their facebook accounts. I think it’s a little drastic and extreme as addressing procrastination is more about being conscious of our actions than counteracting via self-binding methods, but if you feel that’s what’s needed, go for it.

                                          5. Hang out with People Who Inspire You to Take Action

                                          I’m pretty sure if you spend just 10 minutes talking to Steve Jobs or Bill Gates, you’ll be more inspired to act than if you spent the 10 minutes doing nothing. The people we are with influence our behaviors. Of course spending time with Steve Jobs or Bill Gates every day is probably not a feasible method, but the principle applies — The Hidden Power of Every Single Person Around You

                                          Identify the people, friends or colleagues who trigger you – most likely the go-getters and hard workers – and hang out with them more often. Soon you will inculcate their drive and spirit too.

                                          Advertising

                                          As a personal development blogger, I “hang out” with inspiring personal development experts by reading their blogs and corresponding with them regularly via email and social media. It’s communication via new media and it works all the same.

                                          6. Get a Buddy

                                          Having a companion makes the whole process much more fun. Ideally, your buddy should be someone who has his/her own set of goals. Both of you will hold each other accountable to your goals and plans. While it’s not necessary for both of you to have the same goals, it’ll be even better if that’s the case, so you can learn from each other.

                                          I have a good friend whom I talk to regularly, and we always ask each other about our goals and progress in achieving those goals. Needless to say, it spurs us to keep taking action.

                                          7. Tell Others About Your Goals

                                          This serves the same function as #6, on a larger scale. Tell all your friends, colleagues, acquaintances and family about your projects. Now whenever you see them, they are bound to ask you about your status on those projects.

                                          For example, sometimes I announce my projects on The Personal Excellence Blog, Twitter and Facebook, and my readers will ask me about them on an ongoing basis. It’s a great way to keep myself accountable to my plans.

                                          8. Seek out Someone Who Has Already Achieved the Outcome

                                          What is it you want to accomplish here, and who are the people who have accomplished this already? Go seek them out and connect with them. Seeing living proof that your goals are very well achievable if you take action is one of the best triggers for action.

                                          Advertising

                                          9. Re-Clarify Your Goals

                                          If you have been procrastinating for an extended period of time, it might reflect a misalignment between what you want and what you are currently doing. Often times, we outgrow our goals as we discover more about ourselves, but we don’t change our goals to reflect that.

                                          Get away from your work (a short vacation will be good, else just a weekend break or staycation will do too) and take some time to regroup yourself. What exactly do you want to achieve? What should you do to get there? What are the steps to take? Does your current work align with that? If not, what can you do about it?

                                          10. Stop Over-Complicating Things

                                          Are you waiting for a perfect time to do this? That maybe now is not the best time because of X, Y, Z reasons? Ditch that thought because there’s never a perfect time. If you keep waiting for one, you are never going to accomplish anything.

                                          Perfectionism is one of the biggest reasons for procrastination. Read more about why perfectionist tendencies can be a bane than a boon: Why Being A Perfectionist May Not Be So Perfect.

                                          11. Get a Grip and Just Do It

                                          At the end, it boils down to taking action. You can do all the strategizing, planning and hypothesizing, but if you don’t take action, nothing’s going to happen. Occasionally, I get readers and clients who keep complaining about their situations but they still refuse to take action at the end of the day.

                                          Reality check:

                                          I have never heard anyone procrastinate their way to success before and I doubt it’s going to change in the near future.  Whatever it is you are procrastinating on, if you want to get it done, you need to get a grip on yourself and do it.

                                          More About Procrastination

                                          Featured photo credit: Malvestida Magazine via unsplash.com

                                          Read Next