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Anxious Buddies, Relax! Try These 6 Herbal Remedies To Regain Your Peace And Calmness

Anxious Buddies, Relax! Try These 6 Herbal Remedies To Regain Your Peace And Calmness

Anxiety comes in various forms and anyone could experience it any point in their lives. It is characterized by a number of symptoms, including withdrawal from social settings, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), and phobia and usually can be heavily experienced during the teenage years than any other stages in a person’s life. If you are a teenager or a parent of a teenager battling with anxiety, you may find that there are various faces of depression and while it is treatable, often 80% of kids with a diagnosable anxiety disorder are not getting treatment.

In most cases, treating anxiety can be done through therapy and natural healing medications that will help one regain their peace and not totally fall into deep depression.

Along with herbal remedies, there are programs that will help teenagers better understand what they’re going through and better cope with it with the proper guidance from those who have had experience helping those who have been through depression. In an interview with Dr. Jeff Nalin, Psy.D. – Founder and Clinical Director at Paradigm Malibu, he shared that many natural remedies can help with anxiety. “There are a plethora of herbal remedies that can assist anxiety, the Adaptagenic herbs, (Ashwagandha, Eleuthero, Holy Basil, Maca, Ginseng, Rhodiola Rosea, Schisandra, Mucuna Pruriens) Sam E, Cava Cava and the combined use of Evening Primrose Oil and Fish oils, have all shown some degree of clinical success.”

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While most of these natural remedies were proven to help alleviate the anxiety, Dr. Nalin recommends that one must seek professional assistance when partaking them as these remedies do not necessarily replace proper and clinically proven to be effective remedies, “What is most important is to seek professional assistance and not self-medicate or self-diagnose, especially if you are already taking medication.”

Aletheia Luna, author and founder of self-discovery blog Lonerwolf, suffered from anxiety on and off for many years. She was prescribed with many types of medications including Prozac, Desvenlafaxine, and Loxalate. Aletheia jumped from one medicine to another, until she realized all those prescription medications only serve as a “band aid” that superficially numbs an mask her condition. When she was dissatisfied with the results of taking medication, she explored alternative treatments instead. Today we’ll look into some examples of herbal remedies and how they can help people regain peace and calmness.

Disclaimer: Consider taking these medications under the supervision of a professional. While some herbs are harmless, some may carry notable risks. Don’t rely solely on herbal remedies even if they were proven to be effective.

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Dr. Nalin further explains the importance of seeking professional help, “Speak to your doctor first. Residential treatment is an important piece of the puzzle for teen anxiety disorders. It allows treatment to happen in the moment, among their peer group, in a measured, supportive environment, creating an internal sense of self efficacy and esteem.This allows for change to be immediate and readily implemented, rather than something discussed in session and later implemented with varying degrees of success. Here at Paradigm we utilize a holistic approach, tailoring treatment to the individual needs of the client.”

Holistic activities such as Acupuncture, Aikido, Art, Drama, Music, Equine therapy, Challenge Courses, the Alexander Technique, Neurofeedback, Hiking, Salsa, Surfing, Paddle Boarding, Yoga, and Meditation are just some of the additional modalities Dr. Nalin recommends to full recover and release trauma and reconnect their sense of resilience, motivation and joy.

With these in mind, let’s explore some of the natural remedies which may be helpful in regaining you peace and calm:

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1. Ginger tea

Ginger grows indigenously in South China and also spread to other parts of Asia, West Africa, and the Caribbean. It is known to alleviate antidepressant induced nausea. Dietician Alice Mackintosh told the Daily Mail that ginger contains potent gingerol, which helps cleanse the harmful chemicals that our bodies produce when we’re worried, so ginger can help psychological stress. Becky Oberg, a freelance journalist, said her favorite ginger tea recipe is from Dominican Republic. The recipe requires a slice of one-inch piece of ginger, one quart water, one-fourth teaspoon of ground allspice, and one-fourth cup of brown sugar. All you have to do is boil the first three ingredients and simmer for 30 minutes before adding the sugar.

2. Chamomile

The leaves and flower of chamomile are edible. The German chamomile is the variety used in herbal medicine, although Roman chamomile is the true type. Anyone can grow chamomile, especially during spring because the plant grows best in cool conditions. Chamomile is commonly used as a sleeping but it is also beneficial to people experiencing anxiety as it improves mental calmness. To make your own chamomile tea, boil two cups of water and add a tablespoon of dried chamomile flowers. Steep for 15 minutes so the essential oil remains.

3. Rhodiola

It grows in regions with cold climates such as Iceland, Great Britain, and Scandinavia. The roots of this perennial plant are used as medicine in many countries. Rhodiola regulates the body’s hormones, protects cells from damage. Research suggests that Rhodax, a specific rhodiola extract, might lower anxiety in people with general anxiety disorder. Aletheia noted that she takes it in pill form at 1000-2000 mg.

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4. Siberian ginseng

It grows in Asia, but the varieties that grow in Siberia are more powerful when it comes to medicine. It can be taken as capsule, extract, or in powder form. Some take it for around 2000 mg to have its maximum effect. Still, one needs to research on the dosage because there are potential side effects with large quantities.

5. Golden Milk

It is often used in ancient Ayurvedic medicine. Golden Milk contains turmeric, the kind of herb which works as an antidepressant. The first step to make golden milk is to create a mixture in the form of paste. According to Oberg, here’s the right way to make golden milk: Combine half a cup of boiling water with one-fourth cup of turmeric. Stir it constantly until you make a thick paste, before adding one teaspoon ground black pepper. Add one teaspoon of turmeric paste to one cup of warm milk, one-half a teaspoon of sweet almond oil, and a bit of raw honey to sweeten.

6. Flaxseed tea

Flax plant usually grows in colder regions. The seeds (Linum usitatissimum), is often used in Austrian medicine internally. The seeds are generally safe for human beings. It contains healthy omega-3s and healthy fatty acids which help the brain function more effectively. As what Oberg said, you may use a teaspoon per cup of water when you have ground seeds. Then you can use two tablespoons per cup of water if you have meal.

When experiencing anxiety, one doesn’t have to deal with of these alone. It’s important to know that while you seek for herbal and natural remedies, there’s no better cure than knowing that there are many other people out there who have survived and managed to deal with the situation. Whether you’re looking to take professional medical help or join in groups and programs that will help you get a better understand of what you’re going through, the most important thing to keep in mind is that you’re not alone in this battle.

Featured photo credit: mpaola_andreoni via flickr.com

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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