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Good News for Hair Color Aficionados: 9 Tips to Save Your Hair

Good News for Hair Color Aficionados: 9 Tips to Save Your Hair

We all Strive for that perfect hairstyle—flawless, shiny, and healthy. Unfortunately, sometimes saying, “I woke up like this” relates to a disastrously damaged hair and definitely not that messy, cute, and sexy hairstyle we often see on Pinterest, accompanied by a cup of coffee and an inspirational quote.

I’ve dyed my hair numerous times. I’ve been raven black, hot red, pale golden blonde, and everything in between. In my teenage years, my hair has been in pretty much every color that there’s in the rainbow palette. And despite my enthusiasm, I had to take the consequences of that hair-dyeing journey.

After many years of dyeing my hair, I can now share how I managed to bring it back to life again.

The dyed and damaged hair is frizzy, dry, and hardly has a beautiful shape. Often worsened by the extensive use of heat, it loses its natural moisture and is hard to recover. Here are some tips that will help you get back that healthy hair glam we all strive to achieve.

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1. Moisture, moisture, moisture

The healthy hair strand is built of three separate layers. The outer one, which holds the cuticle, is the one that suffers the most when you choose to dye your hair. Be sure to use natural oils a few days prior to the dyeing process. This will strengthen your hair and will help you attain the shiny effect right after. You can go for either high-quality oil hair treatment products, or a super cheap, but yet effective enough alternative, which you probably have in your kitchen already—extra virgin olive oil. It also has a great effect when treating dandruff. More hair mask ideas here.

2. Trim the edges.

It might seem obvious, but sometimes the hair looks and feels damaged due to its length and fuzzy ends. Trimming the ends will give your scalp a break, taking off some of the excess weight. You will be able to see the result almost immediately. The natural oils will spread even on the remaining strands, which will bring back the essential shine.

3. Choose a proper hair treatment.

Determining which products are effective on your hair, depending on its texture, length and color, will most certainly boost the repairing process. To keep the dye looking fresh for as long as possible, look around the shampoo and conditioner aisle for a product that corresponds well with your current hair’s condition.

Is it thin? Is it dry? Does it have dandruff? Most cosmetic companies have already come up with a series of products that naturally complement each other. These include a shampoo, conditioner, hair mask, oils, hair sprays, and more.

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Look around for products that include argan oil. Don’t wash your hair with shampoo too frequently, as it strips away the natural oils from your scalp. If you feel you need to freshen up, there are plenty of dry shampoo alternatives. Ask your stylist for a good quality product line or go more budget-friendly and ask your friends. Either way, the best recommendation is the one that comes from a personal experience.

4. Change your hair dye.

Each time you dye your hair, you cause it either major or minor damage. That’s just the way hair dye works. Choose a brand that works less aggressively towards achieving the final result, or one that works with a bond builder. If you’re striving for a lighter color, like silver or platinum blonde, choose the longer, but safer step-by-step approach. This way you will let your hair and scalp adjust to the changes.

Bonus tip: look for hair dye and hair treatment products that do not include silicone dimethicone. Despite its broad use, this ingredient is likely to attract dirt, which brings the feeling of heaviness on your scalp.

5. Detangle carefully.

Due to its destroyed healthy layering, the damaged dyed hair is often fuzzy and dry. This may lead to extreme cases of tangling. Be sure to take your time and use a proper product to help detangle any thatched hair strands. You can either go for a specialized product for untangling, or use the good old extra virgin olive oil. Either way, make sure you avoid rending.

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Bonus tip: if your hair is curly or easy to tangle, try the dry finger technique. That way you can easily locate any knots before brushing your hair with a comb, while it’s being conditioned.

6. Clean the air.

The smoke particles, dust, dirt and other air contaminants around you will inevitably end up in your hair. It is probably impossible to avoid going outdoors altogether, but you can at least purify your indoor environment with an air purifier for dust. Your lungs and body will thank you for it too.

7. Rinse with cold water.

Try to rinse your hair with cooler water. This helps to seal the moisture and gives a natural shine. The only con (probably other than the feeling of discomfort if you don’t like cold showers) is that it flattens the hair a little.

8. Bring in the brushes!

Sometimes the small change makes a big difference. When choosing a proper hairbrush, go for one that has a combination of 50% synthetic and 50% boar bristles. This hairbrush type will easily spread the oils and naturally soften the hair.

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You can also go with 100% boar bristles. Give it a try on a small section on your hair beforehand. The final effect depends on the spacing between the bristles. Used incorrectly, that type of hairbrush can cause more damage to the already tainted hair.

A great way to determine which is the perfect brush for you, is to ask your hairstylist. As a professional, each stylist uses expensive and fine quality tools, but will sure give you directions when choosing a less expensive alternative.

9. Give it a break.

Hair dye, drying, straightening, curling, styling products—all these factors often aid for additional hair damage. Give both your hair and your scalp a good break. Try avoiding any heat and go for a simple hairstyle, that does not require a lot of styling products. Leave your hair to dry out naturally and don’t forget your hat while it’s summer outside!

Hope these tips will help you save your hair. Looking forward to that glossy Pinterest hair photo.

Featured photo credit: goMainstream via imcreator.com

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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