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7 Secrets to Use to Remember Names

7 Secrets to Use to Remember Names

The mind is a very strange thing. It can remember the lyrics to a song we haven’t heard in ten years, but, unless we consciously work to remember it, our brain can’t recall the name of a person we just met, even if they’re still standing right in front of us. Of course, it’s incredibly difficult to consciously remember a name while simultaneously paying attention to the conversation at hand. We suggest employing some psychological tricks to make sure you remember names of everyone you meet and never forget them for the next time you run into each other.

1. Use the names often

When you meet someone, you’re most likely going to be introduced by a common friend or colleague. Resist the urge to just say “Nice to meet you,” and take it a step further, saying “Nice to meet you, Karen.” Try to sneak their name into conversation as often as possible (without sounding silly, of course). Not only should you repeat their name, but you should also make the effort to get to know them a bit more. Doing so not only humanizes them in your own eyes, but also helps make you aware that you’ll be seeing them again, and therefore their name is worth remembering.

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2. Stay focused on the present

When engaged in a multi-person conversation, your mind is bound to wander at some point. (Especially if you’re in a meeting at work, am I right?). Consciously avoid allowing your mind to wander, especially when you’ve just met a new person. You don’t want your boss to introduce you to someone, and then have to say “I’m sorry, I forgot your name” almost immediately. It will give off the impression that you either weren’t listening when your boss was speaking, or that you’re absent-minded. When in social situations, your head should always be on a swivel, anyway. Keep your head in the game!

3. Think back to the moment you met

If you took the first piece of advice about using the name often, you’ll be able to use that moment to your advantage later on in conversation. It will be much easier to remember names when you recall saying “Nice to meet you, Karen” than it will be to remember your boss saying “Matt, I want you to meet Karen.” Just be careful that you don’t get lost in the conversation while trying to relive the beginning of it!

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4. Associate it with a feature

Pick something out about the person you just met and connect it to their name. Or make up a silly rhyme about them in your head (just don’t let them know about the rhyme). Using a mnemonic is definitely a last-ditch effort, but if it works, it works. If you’re put in the unfortunate position of meeting more than one person at a time, check out their clothing and other features; use the color of their tie, their hair, beard, anything at all that could help. In your head, call them “Grey suit Mike” or “Brown tie Robert.” Just make sure to drop the modifier when you say their names aloud. And remember: They won’t be wearing the same thing next time you see them, so try to get their names down by the end of the first meeting.

5. Study their face

This one can be a little rude, but as long as you keep it to yourself, you should be okay. Everyone is unique in some way, so pick of the person’s unique quality and associate it with their name. Steve with the glasses, Rob with the bald spot. Like I said, it’s not exactly the most polite thing to do, but if it helps, use it. And, unlike using their clothing, they’ll most likely look the same the next time you see them. (And if not, you can always use the old “I hardly recognized you without your glasses!” trick).

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6. Cross-reference their name with another person

If you happen to know anyone with that same name, picture the two of them meeting up and hanging out. Picture them doing something you know your friend is into; if your friend Mike likes to golf, and you just met someone else named Mike, picture them both golfing together. When you take new information in and associate it with information your brain already knows, it makes it easier to solidify the new in your mind.

7. Work on it consciously

Like I said before, when you meet someone new, you should work under the assumption that you’ll be seeing them again soon. Don’t let their name out of your head just because the meeting is over. Review the important points of your conversation, so you have more to remember the person by. Since you’ll know more than just their name after having a conversation with them, it should be easier to remember them as a whole person.

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Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm6.staticflickr.com

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

If I was a super hero I’d want my super power to be the ability to motivate everyone around me. Think of how many problems you could solve just by being able to motivate people towards their goals. You wouldn’t be frustrated by lazy co-workers. You wouldn’t be mad at your partner for wasting the weekend in front of the TV. Also, the more people around you are motivated toward their dreams, the more you can capitalize off their successes.

Being able to motivate people is key to your success at work, at home, and in the future because no one can achieve anything alone. We all need the help of others.

So, how to motivate people? Here are 7 ways to motivate others even you can do.

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1. Listen

Most people start out trying to motivate someone by giving them a lengthy speech, but this rarely works because motivation has to start inside others. The best way to motivate others is to start by listening to what they want to do. Find out what the person’s goals and dreams are. If it’s something you want to encourage, then continue through these steps.

2. Ask Open-Ended Questions

Open-ended questions are the best way to figure out what someone’s dreams are. If you can’t think of anything to ask, start with, “What have you always wanted to do?”

“Why do you want to do that?”

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“What makes you so excited about it?”

“How long has that been your dream?”

You need this information the help you with the following steps.

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3. Encourage

This is the most important step, because starting a dream is scary. People are so scared they will fail or look stupid, many never try to reach their goals, so this is where you come in. You must encourage them. Say things like, “I think you will be great at that.” Better yet, say, “I think your skills in X will help you succeed.” For example if you have a friend who wants to own a pet store, say, “You are so great with animals, I think you will be excellent at running a pet store.”

4. Ask About What the First Step Will Be

After you’ve encouraged them, find how they will start. If they don’t know, you can make suggestions, but it’s better to let the person figure out the first step themselves so they can be committed to the process.

5. Dream

This is the most fun step, because you can dream about success. Say things like, “Wouldn’t it be cool if your business took off, and you didn’t have to work at that job you hate?” By allowing others to dream, you solidify the motivation in place and connect their dreams to a future reality.

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6. Ask How You Can Help

Most of the time, others won’t need anything from you, but it’s always good to offer. Just letting the person know you’re there will help motivate them to start. And, who knows, maybe your skills can help.

7. Follow Up

Periodically, over the course of the next year, ask them how their goal is going. This way you can find out what progress has been made. You may need to do the seven steps again, or they may need motivation in another area of their life.

Final Thoughts

By following these seven steps, you’ll be able to encourage the people around you to achieve their dreams and goals. In return, you’ll be more passionate about getting to your goals, you’ll be surrounded by successful people, and others will want to help you reach your dreams …

Oh, and you’ll become a motivational super hero. Time to get a cape!

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Featured photo credit: Thought Catalog via unsplash.com

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