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18 Common Mistakes About Exercise Pointed Out By Experts

18 Common Mistakes About Exercise Pointed Out By Experts

Fitness and exercise are more popular now than they have ever been. But with the growing popularity of (primarily) indoor workouts like weightlifting, CrossFit, Pilates, and yoga, there is growing room for doing harm to our bodies.

I recently got in touch with health and fitness experts from around the U.S. to find out what they consider some of the most common exercise mistakes. Whether you’re a seasoned pro or a total fitness newbie, chances are you’re making one of them. Take a look at their solutions for help on correcting some of these fitness mistakes:

1. Poor form on simple abdominal crunches

According to Tami Peavy, owner of Practical Therapy4U, keeping your hands behind your head or straight at your side during common ab crunches places an unsafe amount of torque on your neck. This can lead to neck pain, migraines, disc bulging and shoulder pain.

Instead, Tami recommends the “Reverse Crunch.” She explains, “Lying on your back, put your hands under your lower back for support. Bend your knees and keep your feet flat on the floor. Now, lift your knees into your chest, contracting your stomach muscles as you lift. Repeat this 10 times for two sets.” It makes for an effective, low-stress alternative!

2. Static stretching before a workout

Stretching is a good thing, right? It certainly has its place, but it can also be damaging, says Pilatesology co-founder Alisa Wyatt. “Stretching is great after a workout, but if you do it when your muscles aren’t warmed up, then it gives you what I call ‘old rubber band’ muscles. This is when your muscles stretch to the point of weakness and stay that way while you work out, which reduces your strength and power, as well as sets you up for injury.”

Instead of kicking off your workout with a cold stretch, she recommends a warm up that gets your blood moving, your joints lubricated, and helps increase your flexibility all at the same time.

3. Too much running, too hard

Running is one of the most popular forms of exercise, with minimal cost and benefits that include a stronger heart, lungs, and core. But too much of a good thing is still too much.

“Because of its repetitive nature, running has the potential to cause overuse type injuries to the feet, lower extremities, legs and spine,” says Joel K. Jezequel from NY Sports Med. He recommends steady increases in distance (about 10% per week, optimally), addressing muscle strength/length imbalances, and getting sufficient rest between runs.

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4. Too much sitting

From long hours sitting in front of the computer, to driving in our cars and lounging on the couch at the end of a long day, the last thing most of us need is more time spent sitting—especially during our workouts.

“Sitting down to train the shoulders, biceps and back are traditional ways to work those muscles, but it decreases the work for the legs and the core,” explains fitness expert Keli Roberts. “Training in a standing position allows the legs and the core to play a role and is a much better and functional approach to exercise.” She also points out the strong association between extensive time spent sitting and increased mortality risk, according to research from the Pennington Biomedical Research Center.

5. Generating movement from the joints, rather than the muscles

One of the many downsides of poor form is placing too much pressure on the joints, rather than the muscles. This issue, according to CABARRET creatrix Nicole LaBonde, often stems from “bending and unbending at the joint, rather than thinking of lengthening or contracting (the) muscles.”  In order to correct this problem, she will often force students to perform movements in slow motion, keeping the muscles engaged and the joints stress-free.

6. Choosing the wrong workout routine

“The biggest mistake I see people make is doing things they hate,” says Jeanette DePatie, author of The Fat Chick Works Out! “Into every life comes the decision to watch Game of Thrones or do your fitness routine. If you hate your exercise routine, I guarantee, ‘winter is coming.’ I often say exercise is like sex; if you’re not having fun, you’re not doing it right!”

7. Not enough intensity during workout time

It goes without saying, but the goal of most exercise routines is to burn calories and lose weight. And it turns out that most of us are doing it wrong. According to personal trainer and fitness author Clint Fuqua, “EPOC (excess post-exercise oxygen consumption) is the real trick to burning off unwanted fat, increasing stamina for all activities, and being able to enjoy that extra slice of pie with no regrets.”

If you’re looking to trigger this long term post-workout burn, Fuqua recommends pushing hard for 30-40 minutes, rather than hanging around the gym for a hour or more, barely breaking a sweat.

8. Listening too much to the internet, magazines, and books

If you’ve done much research into diet and exercise trends, you’ve probably noticed that the “experts” rarely seem to agree on what’s the best way to lose weight and get healthy. While some are adamantly advising low-carb, high fat diets, others are all-in on keeping fats down and protein high.

The answer may be more simple than you think. Certified strength and conditioning coach Henry Halse says, “You will have much more success if you simply tune out all the background noise and focus on what you know works for you! My dad once gave me the diet advice ‘everything in moderation.’ His mother actually told him that. She didn’t read it in a book, magazine, or Google. It’s something that she knew instinctively. To be honest, researchers are now finding that ‘everything in moderation’ may actually be the most beneficial approach to eating.”

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9. Not rehydrating enough during/after workouts

Did you know that dehydration can have negative effects on everything from your mental sharpness to power, endurance, and much more? David Parishdirector of Biofreeze Human Performance Center, warns that dehydration “is one of the biggest contributors to stalled healing, yet it is one of the most preventable conditions out there.”

He recommends monitoring your sweat loss and making sure to rehydrate with three cups of water for every pound of water weight you lose. He also warns against alcohol, caffeine and certain supplements, all of which can contribute to dehydration.

10. Ignoring bone and joint health

While most of us focus on fitness and muscle strength as the foundation of our exercise, that might be the wrong approach. “An exercise routine that places too much stress on the muscles without caring for joint and bone health often leads to serious pain in supporting areas of the body, such as the lower back, knees and ankles,” says Dr. Steven Kozmary, owner of Kozmary Center for Pain Management.

To avoid these issues, he advises receiving proper nutrition and stretching, and avoiding exercises that place undue stress on crucial joints.

11. Thinking you need a gym membership to get in shape

Think you can’t get a good workout unless you have a pricey gym membership? You’re wrong, says Jen DeCurtins, Premier Protein Ambassador and author of Ultimate Plank Fitness. She points out that “not having access to a gym doesn’t mean you can’t strength train! There are so many workouts you can do at home with your own bodyweight or a set of dumbbells.”

These types of calisthenic workouts are easy to find and can have serious health benefits.

12. Working too hard without resting

Dayna Kurtz, owner of Fitness That Fits You, knows all too well the negative effects that come from over-working. “In a city like New York,” she says, “there is tremendous pressure to look fit. As a result, many clients are inclined to overdo their workouts–hitting the gym multiple times a day, or working the same muscle groups on consecutive days. Muscles need time to rest and repair after strength training.”

She points out that inadequate rest can drastically increase the likelihood of injury and is an essential part of a good fitness regimen.

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13. Not lengthening and stretching muscles

Another misstep that’s become all too common is ignoring the need to lengthen and extend your muscles. “What many weight lifters also don’t know is that lengthening muscles (stretching) will help build more muscle in order to build strength,” says Hope Cowgirl, owner of  inBalance Studio. “Once you become too bulky and immobile, your muscle has no where to go to grow!”

To avoid this problem, be sure to take time to stretch both during and after your workouts.

14. Set realistic goals

If you’re anything like me, you’ve probably started a new diet a month before that big trip to the beach. The problem is that it’s almost impossible to get in the kind of shape you’re hoping to practically overnight. Rhodie Lorenz, a cycling instructor at Joyride Studio and Premier Protein Ambassador agrees. She advises, “Keeping in mind that fitness and nutrition are lifestyle choices that will keep you healthy, commit to exercising when you can and make it happen. You can’t lose 20 pounds in one week, and you can’t begin training for a marathon a week before.”

Instead, she recommends starting with smaller, but steady, plans to help you achieve your goals. Committing to a consistent process will bring you the results you’re after without leaving you feeling frustrated.

15. Poor preparation and distracted workouts

If you’ve been inside a gym recently, you’ve probably noticed dozens of people looking down at their smartphones. As Shane McLean, owner of Balance Guy Training, points out, this can be a serious no-no. “In the age of social media and smartphones,” he says, “gym goers are a little distracted checking their Facebook feeds and posting pics on Instagram, rather than hitting the weights. Lifting weights is not rocket science but you do need to pay attention to get the most of of your routine.”

His simple solution? “Leave the phone behind for one hour. It’s not going to kill you.” I couldn’t agree more.

16. Lack of cross-training and corrective strengthening

It’s easy to get into a groove with an exercise you like. It’s also easy for that groove to turn into a rut, and one that can cause injury and overuse.

One expert who has seen that time and time again is Joan Scrivanich, USA Track & Field Certified Coach and owner of Rise Endurance. Joan cautions, “Certain muscles naturally become stronger when we always do one sport or exercise. Strengthening the muscles that play a smaller but important role help you stay fit, healthy, and injury free. For example, runners would perform corrective exercises that target the core, including the glutes and hips.”

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17. Not enough variety in their workouts

The downsides of repeating the same workouts again and again go beyond the risk of injury alone. Certified trainer and strength coach Ian Montel counsels, “The most common mistakes I have noticed in the gym revolve around a general lack of understanding of the General Adaptation Syndrome. In short,” he continues, “this is the way in which the body adjusts to a specific stimulus. If you are not changing your workouts (through different exercises, routines, intensity, sets, reps, etc.) than you will not see any gains.”

If you want to keep making gains in both strength and fitness level, he suggests following the FITTE (Frequency, Intensity, Time, Type, Enjoyment) principle. Adjusting at least one of these aspects every 4-6 weeks will keep you making gains and avoiding injury.

18. Using too much momentum while lifting free weights

Putting up big numbers in the weight room has its benefits, to be sure. Building strength and lean muscle mass can lead to a more powerful fat-burning metabolism. But as Vivian Eisenstadt, owner and Chief Physical Therapist of Vivie Therapy, warns, if you’re not doing it right you could be doing more harm than good.

Vivian recommends, “Slow controlled movement with intention on what muscle you are working on with a stable core is your best bet for safe great results. Slow controlled ‘eccentric’ muscle contraction (e.g. the slow lowering of the barbell in a bicep curl, or lowering the straight bar down in a bench press) give you more bang for your buck and gets your muscles stronger faster.”

Fixing these fundamental exercise flaws doesn’t have to be hard. Heed the advice above and you’ll be doing your body a major favor. Which of the mistakes above have you been making?

Featured photo credit: not what it looks like/istolethetv via flickr.com

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Jimmy Winskowski

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Last Updated on August 12, 2019

12 Best Foods That Improve Memory and Brain Health

12 Best Foods That Improve Memory and Brain Health

Nutrition plays a vital role in brain function and staying sharp into the golden years. Personally, my husband is going through medical school, which is like a daily mental marathon. Like any good wife, I am always looking for things that will boost his memory fortitude so he does his best in school.

But you don’t have to be a med student to appreciate better brainiac brilliance. If you combine certain foods with good hydration, proper sleep and exercise, you may just rival Einstein and have a great memory in no time.

I’m going to reveal the list of foods coming out of the kitchen that can improve your memory and make you smarter.

Here are 12 best brain foods that improve memory and brain power:

1. Nuts

The American Journal of Epidemiology published a study linking higher intakes of vitamin E with the prevention on cognitive decline.[1]

Nuts like walnuts and almonds (along with other great foods like avocados) are a great source of vitamin E.

Cashews and sunflower seeds also contain an amino acid that reduces stress by boosting serotonin levels.

Walnuts even resemble the brain, just in case you forget the correlation, and are a great source of omega 3 fatty acids, which also improve your mental magnitude.

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2. Blueberries

Shown in studies at Tuffs University to benefit both short-term memory and coordination, blueberries pack quite a punch in a tiny blue package.[2]

When compared to other fruits and veggies, blueberries were found to have the highest amount of antioxidants (especially flavonoids), but strawberries, raspberries, and blackberries are also full of brain benefits.

3. Tomatoes

Tomatoes are packed full of the antioxidant lycopene, which has shown to help protect against free-radical damage most notably seen in dementia patients.

4. Broccoli

While all green veggies are important and rich in antioxidants and vitamin C, broccoli is a superfood even among these healthy choices.

Since your brain uses so much fuel (it’s only 3% of your body weight but uses up to 17% of your energy), it is more vulnerable to free-radical damage and antioxidants help eliminate this threat.

Broccoli is packed full of antioxidants, is well-known as a powerful cancer fighter and is also full of vitamin K, which is known to enhance cognitive function.

5. Foods Rich in Essential Fatty Acids

Your brain is the fattest organ (not counting the skin) in the human body, and is composed of 60% fat. That means that your brain needs essential fatty acids like DHA and EPA to repair and build up synapses associated with memory.

The body does not naturally produce essential fatty acids so we must get them in our diet.

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Eggs, flax, and oily fish like salmon, sardines, mackerel and herring are great natural sources of these powerful fatty acids. Eggs also contain choline, which is a necessary building block for the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, to help you recall information and concentrate.

6. Soy

Soy, along with many other whole foods mentioned here, are full of proteins that trigger neurotransmitters associated with memory.

Soy protein isolate is a concentrated form of the protein that can be found in powder, liquid, or supplement form.

Soy is valuable for improving memory and mental flexibility, so pour soy milk over your cereal and enjoy the benefits.

7. Dark Chocolate

When it comes to chocolate, the darker the better. Try to aim for at least 70% cocoa. This yummy desert is rich in flavanol antioxidants which increase blood flow to the brain and shield brain cells from aging.

Take a look at this article if you want to know more benefits of dark chocolate: 15 Surprising and Science-Backed Health Effects of Dark Chocolate

8. Foods Rich in Vitamins: B vitamins, Folic Acid, Iron

Some great foods to obtain brain-boosting B vitamins, folic acid and iron are kale, chard, spinach and other dark leafy greens.

B6, B12 and folic acid can reduce levels of homocysteine in the blood. Homocysteine increases are found in patients with cognitive impairment like Alzheimer’s, and high risk of stroke.

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Studies showed when a group of elderly patients with mild cognitive impairment were given high doses of B6, B12, and folic acid, there was significant reduction in brain shrinkage compared to a similar placebo group.[3]

Other sources of B vitamins are liver, eggs, soybeans, lentils and green beans. Iron also helps accelerate brain function by carrying oxygen. If your brain doesn’t get enough oxygen, it can slow down and people can experience difficulty concentrating, diminished intellect, and a shorter attention span.

To get more iron in your diet, eat lean meats, beans, and iron-fortified cereals. Vitamin C helps in iron absorption, so don’t forget the fruits!

9. Foods Rich in Zinc

Zinc has constantly demonstrated its importance as a powerful nutrient in memory building and thinking. This mineral regulates communications between neurons and the hippocampus.

Zinc is deposited within nerve cells, with the highest concentrations found in the hippocampus, the part of the brain responsible for higher learning function and memory.

Some great sources of zinc are pumpkin seeds, liver, nuts, and peas.

10. Gingko Biloba

This herb has been utilized for centuries in eastern culture and is best known for its memory boosting brawn.

It can increase blood flow in the brain by dilating vessels, increasing oxygen supply and removing free radicals.

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However, don’t expect results overnight: this may take a few weeks to build up in your system before you see improvements.

11. Green and Black Tea

Studies have shown that both green and black tea prevent the breakdown of acetylcholine—a key chemical involved in memory and lacking in Alzheimer’s patients.

Both teas appear to have the same affect on Alzheimer’s disease as many drugs utilized to combat the illness, but green tea wins out as its affects last a full week versus black tea which only lasts the day.

Find out more about green tea here: 11 Health Benefits of Green Tea (+ How to Drink It for Maximum Benefits)

12. Sage and Rosemary

Both of these powerful herbs have been shown to increase memory and mental clarity, and alleviate mental fatigue in studies.

Try to enjoy these savory herbs in your favorite dishes.

When it comes to mental magnitude, eating smart can really make you smarter. Try to implement more of these readily available nutrients and see just how brainy you can be!

More About Boosting Brain Power

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

Reference

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