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8 Basic Skills All Successful People Have

8 Basic Skills All Successful People Have

A successful person is someone who has achieved what they have set out to to do an often exceeds expectation entirely. Some examples of successful people are Warren Buffet & Bill Gates, both of which have amassed billions of dollars from their efforts in two different avenues of prosperity, but what are the core basic skills that all successful people have?

1. Motivational Skills

In the words of ET the Hip Hop Preacher, “When you want to succeed as bad as you want to breathe, then you will be successful.” Now you may not think that a burning desire to achieve is a skill, but it in essence it is the skill that carries us through to the end, to our final glorious destination that we can then look back and revel in. Lighting your burning desire and keeping it lit is the skill.

2. Communication Skills

As you begin your success journey (once you’ve lit your burning desire dynamite wick), for the most part many people will realize quite soon that as fantastic that we all think we are, we need other people in some way shape or form. We need to take to other people, communicate with people; communicating with people can be in the form of writing copy for your ebook, enticing a client to buy your “platinum package,” thanking/acknowledging the lady who cleans your office or even the drunk stranger you might meet in a bar who gives you some overwhelming enlightenment about what you’re doing wrong in your career/business.

Personally I am a very independent, slightly introverted person, but despite this, I (and so should you) am well aware that two heads are better than one.

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3. Organisation Skills

The world is full of distractions, from TVs, to friends, to families, to adverts on the internet. If you go ahead with your dream or your plan, unless you have some guru-like focus, you will need to organise your life. Organizing your life is difficult if it’s a mess, at least for the first few days, but once you’ve got your house cleaned, start writing down all the things that you need to do each day and complete them all, as soon as you can and to the best of your ability.

Take a shot writing lists for a week, everyday write down a minimum of 5 important things that you know/want/need to do and put a time by all of them, once the clock strikes that time then force yourself to do it; you could do various things, whether its sell your old stuff on eBay, write a blog post, push out 10-20 pushups, it doesn’t matter, break your goal into smaller objectives, write them on paper and complete them step by step. You will see a seemingly magical improvement which in itself will motivate you to continue to organize, achieve and be successful.

4. Emotional Intelligence Skills

Think about someone successful, put yourself in their shoes, and think about a hard decision they will have made and ask yourself whether you would have cowered away due to fear. For example, take Usain Bolt, think about the decision to become and continue being a sprinter, with a potential lack of employment opportunities looming over him and more negatives, would you have cowered away for fear of being broke? Yes, of course, everyone fears the future, but again, fuel your burning desire to achieve, communicate and get help, organize your life and then conquer your fears and other success suppressant emotions.

Throughout life we are bombarded by ups and downs but if you want to be a successful person then you will have to learn to grow exponentially on the up’s and continue to fight through the down’s. Arguments, fights and negativity from other people only slows you down when you deem them to be stronger than you, at the end of the day, emotions are simply bio-chemical fluctuations in your body and you need to see them as such and understand that the “feel” of them will pass.

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Thomas Edison’s teachers said he was “too stupid to learn anything.” He was fired from his first two jobs for being “non-productive.” As an inventor, Edison made 1,000 unsuccessful attempts at inventing the light bulb. When a reporter asked, “How did it feel to fail 1,000 times?” Edison replied, “I didn’t fail 1,000 times. The light bulb was an invention with 1,000 steps.” As you read through these basic skills you will begin to see what mindset successful people have, you should take this attitude on.

5. Confidence Skills

You don’t have to be confident to be successful, so before you think “okay, I’ve failed, I’m not social nor will I ever be confident,” just wait a moment. You just need to learn to be confident in yourself, and in the fact that you as a person can build something. Many people are blessed from a young age with being a raving extrovert, but the skill comes “secondarily” when you push yourself into new situations, scary or not and do your best to complete what it is you set out to while taking the failures on the chin.

Imagine you are standing on a burning building and you know that you able to jump the distance to the next, but it’s simply really high… Simply find certainty and know that you are able to jump that distance and would be able to do it 999999 times out of every 1000000 attempts on the ground, just take the jump and you’ll feel a damn sight better on the other side. This “complex” can be used in both social and business situations, never shy away from an opportunity and never hold yourself back because you “won’t fit in,” when you “don’t” fit in then sure, throw yourself whole heartedly into something new.

6. Self-efficacy Skills

Successful people complete what they start… That’s why they are successful. It doesn’t take a genius to work out the if you set out to make £1,000,000 and you only make £20,000 that you were unsuccessful, but if you leave what you started at £20,000, you then you are only ever going to be unsuccessful. While we can’t achieve everything that we set out to attempt, what splits the successful people from unsuccessful in the long run is the learning, improving, challenging and overcoming.

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Successful people also know when to stop, for example, a boy tries in vain to grow a wheat by planting a pebble on a sandy beach, of course he could take the principle of “successful people finish what they start,” but he’d be there for a few millenia until the universe shifts and transforms pebbles bits into Eukaryota cells that may, just may, sprout something plant like, but at which point… the boy will be dead. The easier thing would have been to take skill 2 (communication) into thought and sought advice from a farmer.

7. Time Management Skills

Successful people and people that are on track to becoming successful appreciate one thing as the scarcest resource, and that’s Time. Time is the only thing we can’t get more of once it’s spent, money comes and goes, but time once spent, never comes back.

Given the above analogy, successful people not only manage their time correctly, by cutting out things such as soap operas and drugs that take up a lot of time but also cut out people that waste their time. Many of us have people in our lives that we can’t say no too, but to free up more time you are going to have to learn to politely tell them to “f” themselves and get on with what you need to do. Once you have your new found time, make sure you don’t waste it watching TV, plan, be organised and communicate with other people to make things happen.

8. Luck Attraction Skills

Luck, yeah, it’s “random,” but successful people attract luck by working hard and sticking to what they do. When you compile all the above skills, you’ll find you attract more luck, like the successful people you aspire the join and supersede.

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But most of all, successful people know what they want.

Featured photo credit: Paxson Woelber via flickr.com

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Josh miller

Founder TrueMiller.com, Josh Miller Enterprises

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Last Updated on July 17, 2019

The Science of Setting Goals (And How It Affects Your Brain)

The Science of Setting Goals (And How It Affects Your Brain)

What happens in our heads when we set goals?

Apparently a lot more than you’d think.

Goal setting isn’t quite so simple as deciding on the things you’d like to accomplish and working towards them.

According to the research of psychologists, neurologists, and other scientists, setting a goal invests ourselves into the target as if we’d already accomplished it. That is, by setting something as a goal, however small or large, however near or far in the future, a part of our brain believes that desired outcome is an essential part of who we are – setting up the conditions that drive us to work towards the goals to fulfill the brain’s self-image.

Apparently, the brain cannot distinguish between things we want and things we have. Neurologically, then, our brains treat the failure to achieve our goal the same way as it treats the loss of a valued possession. And up until the moment, the goal is achieved, we have failed to achieve it, setting up a constant tension that the brain seeks to resolve.

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Ideally, this tension is resolved by driving us towards accomplishment. In many cases, though, the brain simply responds to the loss, causing us to feel fear, anxiety, even anguish, depending on the value of the as-yet-unattained goal.

Love, Loss, Dopamine, and Our Dreams

The brains functions are carried out by a stew of chemicals called neurotransmitters. You’ve probably heard of serotonin, which plays a key role in our emotional life – most of the effective anti-depressant medications on the market are serotonin reuptake inhibitors, meaning they regulate serotonin levels in the brain leading to more stable moods.

Somewhat less well-known is another neurotransmitter, dopamine. Among other things, dopamine acts as a motivator, creating a sensation of pleasure when the brain is stimulated by achievement. Dopamine is also involved in maintaining attention – some forms of ADHD are linked to irregular responses to dopamine.[1]

So dopamine plays a key role in keeping us focused on our goals and motivating us to attain them, rewarding our attention and achievement by elevating our mood. That is, we feel good when we work towards our goals.

Dopamine is related to wanting – to desire. The attainment of the object of our desire releases dopamine into our brains and we feel good. Conversely, the frustration of our desires starves us of dopamine, causing anxiety and fear.

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One of the greatest desires is romantic love – the long-lasting, “till death do us part” kind. It’s no surprise, then, that romantic love is sustained, at least in part, through the constant flow of dopamine released in the presence – real or imagined – of our true love. Loss of romantic love cuts off that supply of dopamine, which is why it feels like you’re dying – your brain responds by triggering all sorts of anxiety-related responses.

Herein lies obsession, as we go to ever-increasing lengths in search of that dopamine reward. Stalking specialists warn against any kind of contact with a stalker, positive or negative, because any response at all triggers that reward mechanism. If you let the phone ring 50 times and finally pick up on the 51st ring to tell your stalker off, your stalker gets his or her reward, and learns that all s/he has to do is wait for the phone to ring 51 times.

Romantic love isn’t the only kind of desire that can create this kind of dopamine addiction, though – as Captain Ahab (from Moby Dick) knew well, any suitably important goal can become an obsession once the mind has established ownership.

The Neurology of Ownership

Ownership turns out to be about a lot more than just legal rights. When we own something, we invest a part of ourselves into it – it becomes an extension of ourselves.

In a famous experiment at Cornell University, researchers gave students school logo coffee mugs, and then offered to trade them chocolate bars for the mugs. Very few were willing to make the trade, no matter how much they professed to like chocolate. Big deal, right? Maybe they just really liked those mugs![2]

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But when they reversed the experiment, handing out chocolate and then offering to trade mugs for the candy, they found that now, few students were all that interested in the mugs. Apparently the key thing about the mugs or the chocolate wasn’t whether students valued whatever they had in their possession, but simply that they had it in their possession.

This phenomenon is called the “endowment effect”. In a nutshell, the endowment effect occurs when we take ownership of an object (or idea, or person); in becoming “ours” it becomes integrated with our sense of identity, making us reluctant to part with it (losing it is seen as a loss, which triggers that dopamine shut-off I discussed above).

Interestingly, researchers have found that the endowment effect doesn’t require actual ownership or even possession to come into play. In fact, it’s enough to have a reasonable expectation of future possession for us to start thinking of something as a part of us – as jilted lovers, gambling losers, and 7-year olds denied a toy at the store have all experienced.

The Upshot for Goal-Setters

So what does all this mean for would-be achievers?

On one hand, it’s a warning against setting unreasonable goals. The bigger the potential for positive growth a goal has, the more anxiety and stress your brain is going to create around it’s non-achievement.

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It also suggests that the common wisdom to limit your goals to a small number of reasonable, attainable objectives is good advice. The more goals you have, the more ends your brain thinks it “owns” and therefore the more grief and fear the absence of those ends is going to cause you.

On a more positive note, the fact that the brain rewards our attentiveness by releasing dopamine means that our brain is working with us to direct us to achievement. Paying attention to your goals feels good, encouraging us to spend more time doing it. This may be why outcome visualization — a favorite technique of self-help gurus involving imagining yourself having completed your objectives — has such a poor track record in clinical studies. It effectively tricks our brain into rewarding us for achieving our goals even though we haven’t done it yet!

But ultimately, our brain wants us to achieve our goals, so that it’s a sense of who we are that can be fulfilled. And that’s pretty good news!

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Featured photo credit: Alexa Williams via unsplash.com

Reference

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