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10 Things You Should Know Before Graduation

10 Things You Should Know Before Graduation

If you know these things before you graduate:

  • You may either decide not to graduate at all
  • Or you may graduate making more money than you thought you would by age 40.

1. You Will Likely Need To Unlearn A Lot Of Your Schooling

“The current (educational) structure, which seeks low-cost uniformity that meets minimum standards, is killing our economy, our culture, and us.”―Seth Godin

In the late 1800’s, schools were designed and intended to teach obedience. During the rise of our industrial age, big corporations needed workers for their factories.

The purpose of the academic system was the creation of obedient and compliant workers who never asked meaningful questions. The system was not created to produce scholars and thinkers for tomorrow. There were already tons of scholars at the time.

No. The big businesses needed laborers who would submissively do whatever they needed.

Thus, the creation of the standardized test. Our academic system itself becomes a factory to standardize all of the rising students to ensure they fit the desired mold. If the student failed the tests, they would be held back another year to try again.

Thus, the most frequently asked question in school: Will this be on the test?

Despite the fact that our world has dramatically changed since the late 1800’s, our school systems are structured the same way.

Despite the fact that we can all connect on the internet, there are 10,000 teachers giving the same lecture on a given day across the country. There’s something disturbingly wrong about this. Why don’t they all connect to the same lecture online performed by the best teacher on the subject?

The internet has changed the world. If you want to learn something, you don’t need to get an encyclopedia anymore. You can go to Wikipedia, or Youtube, or a million other places online. There are tons of programs that teach people how to learn things effectively at optimal speeds.

Not only does our model of education not make sense, but the structure of business has changed since the 1800’s as well.

The world is moving to an entrepreneurial and innovation driven economy. It is projected that by 2020, over one billion people will be working from their homes. In the future of work, less people will work for one company as generalists and instead will work for multiple companies as specialists.

The world doesn’t need obedient and compliant factory workers anymore. The world needs artists, creatives, hackers, and innovators. The world needs more emotion and relevance. We desire deeper connection. We’re done with apathetically living out our lives in school and at our 9-5 jobs. We’re sick of it. We’re done with it.

And the best part—the new economy wants it as well.

2. College Degrees Are Becoming Increasingly Irrelevant

“Five years from now, on the Web —for free—you’ll be able to find the best lectures in the world. It will be better than any single university.”Bill Gates (in 2010)

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Far too many kids go to college because they don’t want to let their parents down. The parents have the 9-5 worldview and have perpetuated it to their children. The parents don’t realize the stark changes in the world and future of work. The parents don’t realize they are doing their children a huge disservice.

Whatever it is you want to learn, just know that college isn’t the only option. There are loads of online courses available—many for free.

The goal should be learning, not names on pieces of paper. If college is where you’re going to get the right education you need, then go there. If you can get it better, faster, and cheaper somewhere else, think twice.

The market doesn’t care if you have a degree or not. The market just wants your best work.

3. You Should Know If College Will Get You Where You Want To Go

“Cat: Where are you going? Alice: Which way should I go? Cat: That depends on where you are going. Alice: I don’t know. Cat: Then it doesn’t matter which way you go.”―Lewis Carroll

And that’s the problem. So many people have no clue where their ideal destination in life is.

Do you know where you want to go?

Success is an intrinsic concept. It should be self-generated and not based on societal or cultural norms. You decide what you want in life, what makes you happy, and go for that.

In today’s world, college is probably not the most effective way to get where you want to go. All of the tools are in place to start doing what you want to do now. You just need to know what you want to do and have the courage to start.

With that said, college is absolutely the right place to be for many people. And the people that know this generally flourish while they are there. They are purposeful and focused. They are moving toward their ideal destination in life. College is the correct means for their desired ends.

You must ask yourself as Peter Thiel does—“How can you achieve your 10 year plan in the next 6 months?”

There is always a better and faster path to your ideal than the one you’re taking. If you realize college isn’t for you, don’t stay in just because you’ve already put a lot of time and resources into it.

Psychologists have a term called sunk cost fallacy, which explains that people often make horrible decisions because they’ve already invested into a certain choice. Walk away. The further you continue the wrong direction, the longer it will take you to get back on your ideal path.

4. You Are Your Only Competition

“When everybody zigs, zag”—Marty Neumeier

If art, passion, authenticity, and innovation are the needed ingredients of the future, than you need to step away from comparing and competing with other people.

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Innovators stop competing and delve into uncharted territory. You are an innovator. You simply need to tap into your own unique identity, and dive into what makes you happy. You can create art and do work that no one else can do. You see the world in your own unique way—now show us that world.

Don’t get caught living other people’s dreams. Don’t lose yourself in the propaganda and agenda of society. Be you and everyone will be the benefactor—not the least of which is you.

Never forget these words from Oscar Wilde—“Everything popular is wrong.” Don’t follow the masses. It’s a long slow slog that won’t get you very far.

5. The Choices You Make Now Will Impact The Rest Of Your Life

“’…Your twenties: the decade of decision.’ Amen.”—David Archuleta

Your twenties are your decade of decision. These years in large measure dictate the rest of your life.

Who do you want to be?

What kind of work do you want to do?

What kind of lifestyle do you want to have?

What kind of people do you want to spend time with?

When life gets more complicated, and you have more responsibilities, you won’t have the same flexibility you have now. It will be harder to adjust your path. Right now, you can go whichever direction you want.

6. You Shouldn’t Wait Until After College To Do All You Want To Do

“Professor Harold Hill: You pile up enough tomorrows, and you’ll find you are left with nothing but a lot of empty yesterdays. I don’t know about you, but I’d like to make today worth remembering.”―Meredith Willson

In his book, The 4-Hour Workweek, Tim Ferriss teaches what he terms, the deferred-life plan. The essence of this idea is waiting to live. It is best expressed in the concept of retirement. So many people defer the life of their dreams until retirement. They defer happiness. They consciously live a life they despise.

You don’t have to do this.

You don’t need permission to start living your dreams. You don’t need a college degree to give you permission either. You are the gatekeeper to living your own life to the fullest.

Gary Vaynerchuck has said that in your 20’s and 30’s, you should be taking huge risks in your career. Maybe, when you hit age 40, you should start getting more conservative. At that point, you will likely have more responsibilities and need to think differently.

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But right now, while you’re in college, there is zero risk. Not only is there no risk, but you have tons of time! College does not require 40 hours per week. Chances are, you have 20-30 hours per week you could put into your dreams if you want.

Actually, college is the best time to become an entrepreneur. If you play your cards right, you could become successful enough that you can quit school. Or, by the time you graduate, you could be earning more money doing your own thing than you could have at an entry level job.

It doesn’t take that much time to build a lucrative online business anymore. If you put a solid year or two in, you could be wildly successful doing exactly what you want.

7. There Are Two Worlds Of Work

Dan Sullivan of Strategic coach has explained this far more beautifully than I ever could. For this reason, I will provide a long quote of his.

“At the turn of the last century, factories revolutionized the way goods were produced and delivered to the public. With factory work came a different attitude toward workers. They were parts in a machine and could be replaced. While they were working, it was necessary to ensure that things ran as uniformly and predictably as possible. Every day’s work was the same, and compensation was given in exchange for the length of time worked. Working long hours was a sign of loyalty. In sum, theirs was a bureaucratic time system. I call it “The Time-and-Effort Economy.”

Today, bureaucratic systems are breaking down. Advances in technology have radically shifted our thinking, emphasizing the limitless creative potential of the individual. Entrepreneurs are on the leading edge of this trend, stepping free from old structures to innovate and create value with greater speed and adaptability than lumbering institutions, which are focused on perpetuating themselves rather than serving their markets. Entrepreneurs live in what I call “The Results Economy.”

They get paid only for the results they produce, based on the value these results create for their clients and customers. Theirs is an entrepreneurial time system. Why, then, do so many entrepreneurs still operate as if it mattered how long or how hard they work? An unhealthy notion of virtue has become attached to burnout, regardless of whether the long hours have produced any results. This thinking completely misses the point of being an entrepreneur, which is freedom. One world of work is the industrial factory model that the academic system funnels people into. Be incredibly weary of this world of work. You will lose your soul. This is the 9-5 model. You will spend your time doing someone else’s agenda. You will be the slave to your boss. You will not have a lot of freedom or flexibility in your schedule.”

Which world of work will you choose? The Time-and-Effort Economy or The Results Economy?

8. You Might Be Pursuing A Shadow Dream—Which Would Be Bad

“We tend to pursue “shadow careers” – jobs that are similar to our dreams, but not quite our dreams.”—Ben Arment

People do this all the time. They dream of being a novelist but instead become an English professor. They dream of owning a gym but instead become a gym teacher. They dream of becoming a race car driver but instead become a mechanic.

“Shadow dreams” reflect your dream but are a far less risky version. This reflects a lack of belief that you can do it. That you can really make it doing what you love.

I believe the mass population is pursuing shadow dreams. They say they’re doing what they love. But they really don’t. They wish they were doing something different. They’ve settled for far less than they could’ve had.

Don’t settle for a shadow dream.

9. You’re Probably Thinking Too Small For Yourself

“Those who believe they can move mountains, do. Those who believe they can’t, cannot. Belief triggers the power to do.”―David J. Schwartz

You’ve probably had your dreams beaten into submission. You’ve been told to be realistic. To fit-in. This is all horrible advice.

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As Napoleon Hill has said—“Whatever the mind can conceive and believe, it can achieve.”

It really comes down to being creative and imaginative, then believing you can actually do it. If you don’t believe it, it won’t happen. But if you can think it and believe it, you can do it. No matter how big. No matter how unrealistic.

The world needs bigger thinking. Tim Ferriss recently interviewed Peter Diamandis and both agreed that most startups are only providing incremental improvement to what already exists. The world needs more exponential improvements. The world needs people to pursue “moonshot” goals. Go big and be bold.

If abundance is where we’re going, bold is the pathway. The world progresses because of big thinkers who are bold enough to try. Be one of those big thinkers. You’re in college. There’s no risk. Change the world.

There has never been a time like this in the history of the world. A large majority of the world’s most successful people are in their 20’s and 30’s. We live in a time when you can create something that quickly becomes a billion dollar company.

“Want to become a billionaire? Then help a billion people. The world’s biggest problems are the world’s biggest business opportunities.”—Peter Diamandis

10. Freedom And Security Are Not The Same Thing

“He who sacrifices freedom for security deserves neither.”—Benjamin Franklin

The desire for security is rooted in the emotion of fear. People who are seeking security perceive a scarcity of jobs and resources. Consequently, they want to put themselves in the safest position—devoid of as much risk as possible.

Unfortunately, this mindset often leads people into jobs they hate but will never quit (“golden handcuffs”).

It has been said that, “freedom is the heavy cost of security.” People would rather feel safe and secure than free. They have become a slave to their jobs and they lack the courage to take the leap. The risks are perceived as too great to live the life of their dreams.

This whole notion of security is completely misconstrued. There can be no security in external things—only slavery and dependence. The only true form of security a person can have is internal. If they are secure in themselves, than they are free. Otherwise, they are slaves.

Conclusion

Right now is the best time in the world to be a student or recent graduate. Our global economy yields infinite opportunities to create a life of freedom doing what you love. There are little to no risks at this time in your life.

Crush it.

Featured photo credit: Girl Reading Magazine In Hotel Bed/ Ed Gregory via stokpic.com

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

How to Increase Work Productivity: 9 Ground Rules

How to Increase Work Productivity: 9 Ground Rules

We all have those days when completing our assigned tasks seems beyond reach. With the temptation of social media, mobile games, and the internet in general—not to mention the constant bustle of people in the office—it’s easy to fall prey to disruptions and distractions at work.

So, what can we do about it? How to be productive at work?

While we don’t have a foolproof system that can completely eliminate disturbances and diversions, we do have 9 ground rules that can be applied to help give your productivity levels a boost.

Keep reading to find out our tips on work productivity.

What Does It Mean to Be Productive?

How to be productive at work?” is the age-old question plaguing employees and employers alike around the world. Regardless of where you work and what you do, everyone is always looking for new ways to be more efficient and effective.

But what does being productive actually entail?

Completing more tasks on your list or working longer hours doesn’t necessarily mean you’re being more productive. It just means you’re more busy, and productivity shouldn’t be confused with busyness.

Productivity means achieving effective results in as short amount of time as possible, leaving you with more time to enjoy freely.

It involves working smarter, not harder. It means refining processes, speeding up workflows, and reducing the chances of interruptions.

Productivity is best achieved when looking at your current way of working, identifying the bottlenecks, flaws, and hindrances, and then finding ways to improve.

9 Ground Rules on How to Be Productive at Work

1. Avoid Multitasking

Multitasking can give the impression that more tasks can be accomplished as you’re doing multiple things at once. However, the opposite is true.

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Research has shown that attempting to do several things at the same time takes a toll on productivity and that shifting between tasks can cost up to 40 percent of someone’s time.[1] That’s because your focus and concentration is constantly hindered due to having to switch between tasks.

If you have a lot of tasks on your plate, determine your priorities and allocate enough time for each task. That way you can work on what’s urgent first and have enough time to complete the rest of your tasks.

2. Turn off Notifications

According to a Gallup poll, more than 50 percent of US smartphone owners admit to checking their phones a few times an hour.[2]

Switching off your phone—or at least your notifications—during work hours is a good way to prevent you from checking your phone all the time.

The same applies to your computer. If you have the privilege of accessing social media on your work desktop, switch off the notifications on there.

Another good tip is to logout from your social media accounts. Therefore when you feel the urge to check it, you might be swayed because your page isn’t so easily accessible.

3. Manage Interruptions

There are certain disruptions in the office that are unavoidable such as your manager requesting a quick meeting or your colleague asking for assistance. In order to deal with this, your best approach is to know how to handle interruptions like a pro.

Be proactive and inform the people around you of your need to focus. Turn your status on as “busy/unavailable” on your work chat app.

If you’re on a deadline, let your colleagues know that you need to concentrate and would really appreciate not being interrupted for the moment, or even work from home if that’s a feasible option for you.

By anticipating and having a plan in place to manage them, this will minimize your chances of being affected by interruptions.

4. Eat the Frog

Mark Twain once famously said that:

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“if it’s your job to eat a frog, it’s best to do it first thing in the morning. And if it’s your job to eat two frogs, it’s best to eat the biggest one first.”

What this basically means is that you should get your biggest, most urgent task out of the way first.

We all have that big, important task that we don’t want to do but know we have to do because it holds the biggest consequence if we don’t complete it.

Eat the frog is a productivity technique that encourages you to do your most important, most undesirable task first. Completing this particular task before anything else will give you a huge sense of accomplishment. It will set the ball rolling for the rest of the day and motivate you to eagerly complete your other tasks.

5. Cut Down on Meetings

Meetings can use up a lot of time, which is time that can be used to do something useful.

You have to wait for everyone to arrive, then after the pleasantries are out of the way, you can finally get stuck into it. And sometimes, it may take a whole hour to iron out one single issue.

The alternative? Don’t arrange a meeting at all. You’ll be surprised at how many things can be resolved through an email or a quick phone call.

But that doesn’t mean you should eliminate meetings altogether. There are certain circumstances where face-to-face discussions and negotiations are still necessary. Just make sure you weigh up the options prior.

If it’s just information sharing, you’re probably better off sending an email; but if brainstorming or in-depth discussion is required, then an in-person meeting would be best.

6. Utilize Tools

Having the right tools to work with is crucial as you’re only really as good as the resources you have at your disposal. Not only will you be able to complete tasks as efficiently as possible, but they can streamline processes. Said processes are essential to a business as they manage tasks, keep employees connected, and hold important data.

If you’re the manager or business owner, ensure your team has the right tools in place.

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And if you’re an employee and think the tools you currently have to work with aren’t quite up to par, let your manager know. A good team leader understands the significance of having the right tools and how it can impact employee productivity.

Some examples of tools that could be used:

Communication
  • Slack for team chat and collaboration.
  • Samepage for video conference software.
  • Zendesk for customer service engagement.
Task Management
  • Zenkit for task and project collaboration.
  • Wunderlist for listing your to-do’s.
  • Wekan for an open source option.
Database Management
Time Tracking
  • Clockify for a free tracker.
  • TMetric for workspace integrations.
  • TimeCamp for attendance and productivity monitoring.

You can also take a look at these Top 10 Productivity Tools to Help You Achieve 10x More in Less Time.

7. Declutter and Organize

Having a disorganized and cluttered workspace can limit your ability to focus. According to researchers, physical clutter can negatively impact your ability to concentrate and take in information.[3] Which is why keeping your work environment well ordered and clutter-free is important.

Ensure you have your own system of organization so you know what to do when the paperwork starts to pile up.

Being organized will also ensure that you know where to find the appropriate stationery, tools, or documents when you need it. A US study reveals that the average worker can waste up to one week a year looking for misplaced items.[4]

Here’s a useful guide to help you declutter and organize: How to Declutter Your Life and Reduce Stress (The Ultimate Guide)

8. Take Breaks

Taking regular breaks is essential for maintaining productivity at work. Working in front of a computer can lead to a sedentary lifestyle which can place you at a higher risk of heart disease, diabetes, and obesity. Even a 30 second microbreak can increase your productivity levels up to 30 percent.

As well as your physical health, breaks are also crucial for your mental and emotional wellbeing. That’s because your brain is like a muscle, the more it works without a break, the easier it is for it to get worn out.

Ensuring you actually take your breaks can prevent you from suffering from decision fatigue. It can also help boost creativity.

Take a look at this article and learn why you should start scheduling time for breaks: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

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9. Drink Water

Although we know we should, it’s easy to forget to drink enough water during the working day.

Many of us turn to tea or coffee for the caffeine hit to keep us going. However, like taking breaks, drinking water is essential for maintaining productivity levels at work. It’s simple and effective.

Not drinking enough water can lead to dehydration and also headaches, tiredness, and weight gain.

A good tip to avoid dehydration is to keep a water bottle at your desk as it can serve as a reminder to constantly drink water.

If you find the taste of water a little bland, add some fruit such as cucumber or lemon to give it a better taste.

You can also get more ideas on how to drink more water here: How to Drink More Water (and Why You Should)

The Bottom Line

The preceding 9 ground rules on work productivity aren’t the be-all, end-all. You and the company you work for may have other tips on how productivity is best increased and maintained.

After all, it’s something that can be perceived differently depending on the exact job and work environment.

In saying that, however, the 9 ground rules serve as a good foundation for anyone finding themselves succumbing to disruption and distraction, and are looking for ways to overcome them.

A good tip to keep in mind is that change doesn’t happen overnight. Start small and be consistent. If you slip up, just dust yourself off and try again.

Developing habits happens gradually, so as long as you keep up with it, you’ll soon start to notice the changes you’ve been making and eventually enjoy the fruits of your labor.

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Featured photo credit: Cathryn Lavery via unsplash.com

Reference

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