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10 Reasons Why B Students Are Likely To Be Successful

10 Reasons Why B Students Are Likely To Be Successful

It’s an incredibly ironic belief that straight-A students will automatically be more successful than their B-average counterparts. In this day and age, there are so many stories about people who dropped out of high school or college to become world-renowned entrepreneurs. To be clear, these people didn’t drop out because they couldn’t hack it, but because they saw no point in getting a 4.0 while taking electives they had no interest in. They chose to create their own paths. Most “B students” are really “A students” that have chosen to focus on other aspects of their lives, while maintaining their grades as best they can.

Disclimer: This is no attack on A students — everyone learns and works in their own way. Keep doing what you’re doing!

1. They don’t waste time on frivolous studying

B students don’t love doing homework or studying for exams. Nobody really does, but B students don’t feel the need to make it a priority. Sure, they get it done, and they learn enough to pass the tests, but they also spend time outside the library. B students rarely turn down opportunities to go on adventures or do something fun because they have a project due later in the week. They understand that an impromptu adventure will do more for them in the long-run than remembering dates from a history book.

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2. They focus on other interests

B students are generally quite intelligent. They just don’t feel the need to learn only what their teachers tell them to learn. When they find something that interests them, they will put their all into it. Again, they don’t completely shirk their responsibilities. They’ll learn enough about a subject to pass with a decent mark. While they were earning that B-minus in chemistry, they were busy designing a new computer program, or learning to shred like Jimi Hendrix. You can’t put a grade on that.

3. They follow their passions

Along with having other interests, they don’t let school get in the way of their passions. Many A students graduate having no clue what they even like to do, since they spent four years making the grade to please their parents and teachers. B students, on the other hand, graduate high school with a sigh of relief, knowing they’ll soon be able to go to school for something they enjoy. When B students are able to finally enjoy their studies, something incredible happens: They become A students.

4. They’re more relaxed

B students don’t always need to be the best or get top marks. Yes, they still freak out if they fail a test. But, they don’t set unrealistic expectations for themselves, and are often pretty happy with the results they get. Even when following their passion, they don’t lose their mind when they don’t get something right; they just practice harder for the next time.

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5. They multitask

A students may lock themselves away for hours on end in order to study. B students, on the other hand, study in between reading up on the news, checking on other projects, and generally keeping up with the things that actually interest them. I’m not saying it’s good to have your phone out while you should be focusing on a task, but in most modern jobs you might have to juggle five different priorities at any given time. Being able to wear many hats is a necessity, and B students have practiced doing that for years.

6. They are “Jacks of all trades”

Although many B students have passions and priorities outside of school, many don’t know what their passion is yet. Because of this, they get involved in a variety of areas, testing the waters to see which they like most. In doing so, they often pick up enough to become much more than beginners in a variety of practices.

I’m not the best guitarist in the world, but considering it’s a small hobby of mine, I’m pretty darn good. Same with playing chess, fishing, writing, interpreting literature and poetry — the list goes on. My wife, who is in her final year of optometry school, tells me that a lot of people she’s met throughout her schooling are absolute master optometrists, but don’t have half the amount of knowledge I do about generally everything else in the world. I might not be a master at one thing, but I definitely am well-rounded enough to find a job in a variety of areas.

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7. They’re entrepreneurial

Since they tend to follow their passion, and not just regurgitate what their teacher wants them to say, B students often think outside the box. They see something that can be improved and they work towards doing so. Necessity is the mother of invention, and the practical, critical thinker is usually the one who isn’t afraid to go against the grain a bit. While A students tend to toe the line, B students are the ones asking why there’s a line in the first place. They look at the world from an analytical position, and question policies and procedures they don’t agree with. While A students keep the world moving, B students are the ones that want to change it.

8. They’re easy to relate to

My mother teaches high school English, and this year has had the pleasure of having an absolute genius in her class. As a teacher, she loves it because she sees incredible potential in the young man. The other students, on the other hand, groan whenever he raises his hand, and it most likely stems from the fact that they have no idea what he’s talking about half the time. He’s just on another level. Again, this isn’t a dig at him, as being incredibly intelligent isn’t a bad thing at all. However, there’s something to be said for the people who can take complex ideas and bring them down to earth, so “us normal people” can understand. Being well-rounded and well-educated, while also maintaining a sense of “being real,” takes B students much farther than good grades ever will.

9. They’re realistic

B students are realistic about their goals, their accomplishments, and their abilities. They set goals that are attainable, and continue to set more goals once previous ones have been reached. B students usually tend to downplay their accomplishments. This might be because they know they could have achieved more with a bit more focus, or because they don’t place huge importance on extrinsic rewards. B students know that there are some things they just aren’t great at, and they accept that. By eliminating the drive to be the best at everything, they often excel at that which they wish to excel at.

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10. They are self-defined

B students are not defined by a grade given to them by a teacher who is a master at that specific subject. They define their accomplishments and worth by what it means to them. The grade doesn’t matter — the experience does. It’s incredibly possible that many A students can go through high school without actually understanding anything, simply regurgitating notes the teacher gave them. However, it’s also possible that B students can perform above average most of the time, and earn A’s when they truly comprehend a topic and put their all into it. But again, the satisfaction does not come from earning a higher grade, but from knowing the job was done well.

Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm9.staticflickr.com

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Matt Duczeminski

A passionate writer who shares lifestlye tips on Lifehack

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Last Updated on March 23, 2021

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

One of the greatest ironies of this age is that while various gadgets like smartphones and netbooks allow you to multitask, it seems that you never manage to get things done. You are caught in the busyness trap. There’s just too much work to do in one day that sometimes you end up exhausted with half-finished tasks.

The problem lies in how to keep our energy level high to ensure that you finish at least one of your most important tasks for the day. There’s just not enough hours in a day and it’s not possible to be productive the whole time.

You need more than time management. You need energy management

1. Dispel the idea that you need to be a “morning person” to be productive

How many times have you heard (or read) this advice – wake up early so that you can do all the tasks at hand. There’s nothing wrong with that advice. It’s actually reeks of good common sense – start early, finish early. The thing is that technique alone won’t work with everyone. Especially not with people who are not morning larks.

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I should know because I was once deluded with the idea that I will be more productive if I get out of bed by 6 a.m. Like most of you Lifehackers, I’m always on the lookout for productivity hacks because I have a lot of things in my plate. I’m working full time as an editor for a news agency, while at the same time tending to my side business as a content marketing strategist. I’m also a travel blogger and oh yeah, I forgot, I also have a life.

I read a lot of productivity books and blogs looking for ways to make the most of my 24 hours. Most stories on productivity stress waking up early. So I did – and I was a major failure in that department – both in waking up early and finishing early.

2. Determine your “peak hours”

Energy management begins with looking for your most productive hours in a day. Getting attuned to your body clock won’t happen instantly but there’s a way around it.

Monitor your working habits for one week and list down the time when you managed to do the most work. Take note also of what you feel during those hours – do you feel energized or lethargic? Monitor this and you will find a pattern later on.

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My experiment with being a morning lark proved that ignoring my body clock and just doing it by disciplining myself to wake up before 8 a.m. will push me to be more productive. I thought that by writing blog posts and other reports in the morning that I would be finished by noon and use my lunch break for a quick gym session. That never happened. I was sleepy, distracted and couldn’t write jack before 10 a.m.

In fact that was one experiment that I shouldn’t have tried because I should know better. After all, I’ve been writing for a living for the last 15 years, and I have observed time and again that I write more –and better – in the afternoon and in evenings after supper. I’m a night owl. I might as well, accept it and work around it.

Just recently, I was so fired up by a certain idea that – even if I’m back home tired from work – I took out my netbook, wrote and published a 600-word blog post by 11 p.m. This is a bit extreme and one of my rare outbursts of energy, but it works for me.

3. Block those high-energy hours

Once you have a sense of that high-energy time, you can then mold your schedule so that your other less important tasks will be scheduled either before or after this designated productive time.

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Block them out in your calendar and use the high-energy hours for your high priority tasks – especially those that require more of your mental energy and focus. You also need to use these hours to any task that will bring you closer to you life’s goal.

If you are a morning person, you might want to schedule most business meetings before lunch time as it’s important to keep your mind sharp and focused. But nothing is set in stone. Sometimes you have to sacrifice those productive hours to attend to other personal stuff – like if you or your family members are sick or if you have to attend your son’s graduation.

That said, just remember to keep those productive times on your calendar. You may allow for some exemptions but stick to that schedule as much as possible.

There’s no right or wrong way of using this energy management technique because everything depends on your own personal circumstances. What you need to remember is that you have to accept what works for you – and not what other productivity gurus say you should do.

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Understanding your own body clock is the key to time management. Without it, you end up exhausted chasing a never-ending cycle of tasks and frustrations.

Featured photo credit: Collin Hardy via unsplash.com

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