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12 Tips for Navigating Chrome Like a Boss

12 Tips for Navigating Chrome Like a Boss

Google Chrome is one of the most popular web browsers nowadays, by far. However, just like any other browser, if you know all of the tips and tricks, the experience can be improved in a multitude of ways. There are some improvements that can literally make you a lot more productive, while at the same time improve the browsing experience as a whole.

Check out these 12 tips and tricks to help you take charge of Chrome.

1. Tab Pinning

If you have too many tabs open, you will find that these occupy a lot of real estate. You can pin a tab and make it occupy less browser space by right clicking on it and choosing the option to Pin Tab. You can do this for as many tabs as you want, there is no restriction.

2. Use Chrome commands

If you want to access hidden features found deep within the browser, then just type chrome://chrome-urls in the address bar and you will see a list of all these tools. This is a great way to find out great stuff already available within your browser.

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3. The Omnibox’s Hidden Treasures

sky-bookmark

    Shourya Ray, CEO of SkyChildCare, offered this tip: “If you click the star in the far right of the omnibox, it will prompt a bookmark list. You can add a site, like SkyChildCare, to your list of favorites from there. Also, at the far left of your omnibox, there is a little icon that looks like a dog-eared piece of paper, or a lock for a secured site. Clicking on that will pull up a window with information about that particular site and permissions, which you can then mess with.”

    4. Add events in Google Calendar

    events

      You can add events into your Google Calendar from the omnibox by first clicking the navicon in the upper right hand corner and choosing Settings. You will then scroll down to Search and click on Manage search engines. At the bottom of the box that pops up, there will be 3 empty boxes for you to add information. In the first box, enter “Add Calendar Event.” In the second box, enter “cal”. Finally, enter http://www.google.com/calendar/event?ctext=+%s+&action=TEMPLATE&pprop=HowCreated%3AQUICKADD into the last box. Click done and then you can add calendar events directly from the omnibox. To add an event, type cal and press Tab, and enter your event. You can even type the event right into the omnibox, like “Pick up Bobby from camp, 12 p.m.”

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      5. Use the task manager

      Chrome is known to be a resource hog, but it can be hard to determine which tab consumes the most resources. If you want to find out such a thing, go to the Menu, click on More Tools and then choose the Task Manager. You can end any process on the spot in order to save precious memory.

      6. Move more tabs at once

      Just hold down CTRL and click on the tabs you want to move. Then when you want to move them you will just need to drag a single tab and they will all go to the desired destination.

      7. Omnibox unit converter

      unit-converter

        You can also perform unit conversions in the omnibox, without switching to Google search. Just start typing a unit in the omnibox, like “500 meters =” and Chrome will suggest a conversion rate, like miles. If you want a different unit than the one suggested, just start typing the unit in the omnibox.

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        8. Omnibox calculator

        The browser is so powerful that it can solve math problems very fast. Just insert the math problem in the omnibox and you will receive the result in a matter of seconds. This trick works only if the default search engine is Google.

        9. Chrome is an image browser

        image-search

          Yes, just drag and drop your images in Chrome and you will be able to browse through them without any problem using the arrow keys.

          10. Browse through tabs

          If you want to browse through tabs, you will need to press Ctrl+Tab. You can repeat this process as many times as you want until you reach the desired tab. There are no restrictions in this regard.

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          11. Open tabs closed by mistake

          Let’s say you accidentally closed LifeHack before you were finished reading. You can bring them back with a simple action. You just need to press Control-Shift-T as many times as you want in order to access the desired tabs once again.

          12. Drag to search

          Instead of copying and pasting a word or phrase you want to search, you can just highlight it and drag it into the omnibox. If your wrist muscles are just too tired from all of the dragging and dropping, you can also highlight a word or phrase and then right click and Chrome will prompt a pop-up option to search.

          All in all, if you follow these Chrome usage tips you will be able to master this browser and the results will definitely be well worth it. Just implement them, and you will see how amazing your Google Chrome usage sessions can actually be!

          Featured photo credit: VFS Digital Design via flickr.com

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          Last Updated on February 15, 2019

          7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

          7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

          Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

          Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

          Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

          So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

          Joe’s Goals

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            Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

            Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

            Daytum

              Daytum

              is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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              Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

              Excel or Numbers

                If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

                What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

                Evernote

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                  I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

                  Evernote is free with a premium version available.

                  Access or Bento

                    If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

                    Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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                    You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

                    Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

                    All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

                    Conclusion

                    I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

                    What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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