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13 Things Only People Who Live In Tropical Regions Would Understand

13 Things Only People Who Live In Tropical Regions Would Understand

Usually, tropical regions are one of the premier travel destinations during summers, given that most are filled with lush rainforests, jungles, and beaches. Basically, these tropical locations are commonly understood to be in: the area surrounding the equator, including Panama, Brazil, the countries in the Caribbean, and those in Southeast Asia, including the Philippines, Malaysia, Thailand, and Indonesia.

Though the tropics are perceived as the ‘gateways to paradise’ and home to exotic cultures, what are these places like for the people who live there in the first place? Here’s a list of things that only people who live in tropical regions would understand:

1. You see tourists every day

Given that the tropics are warm throughout the year, seeing tourists walking around the streets and engaging with the local population is nothing new. In fact, you see it every day.

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2. You live near a beach

If you live on an island or an archipelago in an area like the Bahamas, Indonesia, and the Philippines, you’re just a short drive away from the sun, salt, and sand. Going to the beach can become a weekly activity instead of an occasional trip.

3. You live near a forest

There are landlocked tropical countries, particularly in South America (Bolivia, Paraguay) and Africa (Burundi and Chad). These countries, (along with many other tropical countries), are filled with forests hosting a wide array of flora and fauna. Rivers and geographical attractions are also close by, giving you a variety of places to visit.

4. You can wear the same types of clothes year round

You don’t need to spend much money on season-specific clothes, given that there are only two seasons: dry and wet. The good part about having two seasons is you can wear the same type of clothes regardless of the season- though you’ll need coats and jackets to keep you dry when rain starts to fall.

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5. You wear flip flops every day

Particularly in Southeast Asian countries, flip flops are everyone’s staple footwear. Regardless if you’re in the streets or on the beach, they’re everywhere and are good for your feet if it’s extremely hot.

6. You consider air conditioning bliss

The dry season can get extremely hot, and given the high levels of humidity in tropical countries, summers can be pretty exhausting. Air conditioning gives you a temporary reprieve from the discomfort, and so you find places where air conditioning is installed to be blissful spaces to spend time.

7. Your skincare procedures are different

If you look up “skincare tips” on Google, you’ll most likely find tips tailor-made for a western, non-tropical audience. Bear in mind that weather conditions and the climate are different in these places, which in turn changes the way you deal with your skin. Common examples include dealing with humidity, the constant necessity for sunscreen, and the importance of moisturizers as human skin can absorb humidity from the air.

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8. You’ve encountered too many bugs

Insects and other similar critters thrive in tropical countries, and you’ve likely met the gargantuan spider that made a home in the hole in the bathroom ceiling. Ants, cockroaches, and flies can be found anywhere, which is why cleaning is a frequent requirement and food is stored away meticulously.

9. You eat fruit and seafood regularly

There is no shortage of fruit trees in tropical countries. Bananas, guavas, mangosteen, watermelon and less familiar fruits like lanzones, durian, and star apple are cultivated and widely distributed. If you’re near the sea, squid, various fish varieties, and seafood options like crabs, oysters, and clams can be in abundant supply – just go to the local market to find out!

10. You bathe frequently

At least once or twice a day, bathing is a necessity, particularly during summer. It’s humid all year round, and by the end of the day, your skin is always left sticky.

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11. You never run out of activities

There’s so much to do, you’ll never get bored!

12. You have seen the negative effects of deforestation and littering

Unfortunately, the influx of both local and international tourists takes a toll on the environment. Litter is everywhere, from the white sandy shores to the muddy forest floors. That aside, you’ve also probably seen green mountains with balding brown spots brought about by deforestation and slash-and-burn farming.

13. You love it

In your lifetime, you’ve probably gone to other countries and regions with a different climate. You’ll find the winters of Europe too cold, while the ‘urban-ness’ of American cities will make you wish you were back home. You just can’t forget about your favorite forests, rivers, and beaches.

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

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Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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