Advertising

13 Things Only People Who Live In Tropical Regions Would Understand

Advertising
13 Things Only People Who Live In Tropical Regions Would Understand

Usually, tropical regions are one of the premier travel destinations during summers, given that most are filled with lush rainforests, jungles, and beaches. Basically, these tropical locations are commonly understood to be in: the area surrounding the equator, including Panama, Brazil, the countries in the Caribbean, and those in Southeast Asia, including the Philippines, Malaysia, Thailand, and Indonesia.

Though the tropics are perceived as the ‘gateways to paradise’ and home to exotic cultures, what are these places like for the people who live there in the first place? Here’s a list of things that only people who live in tropical regions would understand:

1. You see tourists every day

Given that the tropics are warm throughout the year, seeing tourists walking around the streets and engaging with the local population is nothing new. In fact, you see it every day.

Advertising

2. You live near a beach

If you live on an island or an archipelago in an area like the Bahamas, Indonesia, and the Philippines, you’re just a short drive away from the sun, salt, and sand. Going to the beach can become a weekly activity instead of an occasional trip.

3. You live near a forest

There are landlocked tropical countries, particularly in South America (Bolivia, Paraguay) and Africa (Burundi and Chad). These countries, (along with many other tropical countries), are filled with forests hosting a wide array of flora and fauna. Rivers and geographical attractions are also close by, giving you a variety of places to visit.

4. You can wear the same types of clothes year round

You don’t need to spend much money on season-specific clothes, given that there are only two seasons: dry and wet. The good part about having two seasons is you can wear the same type of clothes regardless of the season- though you’ll need coats and jackets to keep you dry when rain starts to fall.

Advertising

5. You wear flip flops every day

Particularly in Southeast Asian countries, flip flops are everyone’s staple footwear. Regardless if you’re in the streets or on the beach, they’re everywhere and are good for your feet if it’s extremely hot.

6. You consider air conditioning bliss

The dry season can get extremely hot, and given the high levels of humidity in tropical countries, summers can be pretty exhausting. Air conditioning gives you a temporary reprieve from the discomfort, and so you find places where air conditioning is installed to be blissful spaces to spend time.

7. Your skincare procedures are different

If you look up “skincare tips” on Google, you’ll most likely find tips tailor-made for a western, non-tropical audience. Bear in mind that weather conditions and the climate are different in these places, which in turn changes the way you deal with your skin. Common examples include dealing with humidity, the constant necessity for sunscreen, and the importance of moisturizers as human skin can absorb humidity from the air.

Advertising

8. You’ve encountered too many bugs

Insects and other similar critters thrive in tropical countries, and you’ve likely met the gargantuan spider that made a home in the hole in the bathroom ceiling. Ants, cockroaches, and flies can be found anywhere, which is why cleaning is a frequent requirement and food is stored away meticulously.

9. You eat fruit and seafood regularly

There is no shortage of fruit trees in tropical countries. Bananas, guavas, mangosteen, watermelon and less familiar fruits like lanzones, durian, and star apple are cultivated and widely distributed. If you’re near the sea, squid, various fish varieties, and seafood options like crabs, oysters, and clams can be in abundant supply – just go to the local market to find out!

10. You bathe frequently

At least once or twice a day, bathing is a necessity, particularly during summer. It’s humid all year round, and by the end of the day, your skin is always left sticky.

Advertising

11. You never run out of activities

There’s so much to do, you’ll never get bored!

12. You have seen the negative effects of deforestation and littering

Unfortunately, the influx of both local and international tourists takes a toll on the environment. Litter is everywhere, from the white sandy shores to the muddy forest floors. That aside, you’ve also probably seen green mountains with balding brown spots brought about by deforestation and slash-and-burn farming.

13. You love it

In your lifetime, you’ve probably gone to other countries and regions with a different climate. You’ll find the winters of Europe too cold, while the ‘urban-ness’ of American cities will make you wish you were back home. You just can’t forget about your favorite forests, rivers, and beaches.

Advertising

More by this author

13 Things Only People Who Live In Tropical Regions Would Understand The Ultimate Kitchen Hacks To Peel Almost Everything Effortlessly

Trending in Lifestyle

1 Thanksgiving: It’s About The Simple Things 2 20 Best Budget Travel Destinations to Go At Least Once in Your Life 3 14 Surreal Places In America Even The Locals May Not Have Explored 4 How To Have A Holiday To Any Exotic Destination Even If You Can’t Afford It 5 12 Common Characteristics Of People Who Love Traveling

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on November 22, 2021

Thanksgiving: It’s About The Simple Things

Advertising
Thanksgiving: It’s About The Simple Things

Thanksgiving, a day of pure gluttony, football, and possible uncomfortable situations with family members that you may or may not like. Oh, yeah, and the whole “know and reflect on what it is to be thankful and grateful.”

During the holiday season many people forget what this time of year is bout and are too worried about getting the “early-bird” deals on Black Friday and making sure that they have the perfect gifts for their loved ones. I am sort of a “Grinch” when it comes to the holiday season, mostly because of that mentality by many of the poeple around me.

But instead of being grinch-like this holiday season, I decided to simplify things and get back to what this time of year is actually is about; being thankful for what I have and what I can give.

Advertising

Simplify

I’m not a “minimalist” in any real sense, but in the last few months the talks of Patrick Rhone and others have got me to rethink my stance. Can you really have too much stuff?

Absolutely.

And with all that stuff comes the burden and the weight of it on your back.

Advertising

If you feel that the things around you are out of control, maybe it’s time to simplify and be thankful and grateful for what you have and use. Here are a few things that you can do to simplify:

  • You know those gadgets in the drawer that you said you were going to sell? Well, time to get the listing on eBay and sell them. Or, send them to a place like Gazelle. Even if they are old and won’t get money, you can at least recycle them.
  • Get rid of things you don’t need. Like old books, clothes, tools, etc. Have something that’s been laying around forever with no use? Donate it to a charity or church. If you aren’t using it, someone else could be.
  • Find your productivity tools and stick with them. Use tools and gadgets that serve multiple purposes so you can simplify your tool set.

Be Mindful

You don’t have to be a master Buddhist or meditator to be mindful (although, it can definitely help). Being mindful comes down to being cognizant of the present and not keeping yourself in the past or future. It’s about living in the moment and being aware of yourself and everything around you. It’s just being.

Without getting too “California” on you, it is super important to be mindful during the holiday rush. Rather than worrying about the things that you forgot at your house on the way to relatives or thinking about the next stop in your endless holiday travels, just breath and think about what you are currently doing.

Advertising

Spend the time with your family and friends and don’t crush the moment. Try not to concentrate so hard on getting the perfect photo of the “awesome moment” of the day and actually miss the awesome moment.

Being mindful over the holidays will help you be with your families, friends, and yourself allowing you to enjoy your time.

Reflect

As the year is coming to a close (yes, it really is that close!) it’s a great time to start reflecting on what you have accomplished and what you haven’t. Within the next few weeks we will have a more throrough reflection article here at Lifehack.org, but reflecting every now and then over your holiday break is a great way to see where you have been doing well in your life and where you need to improve.

Advertising

Reflection shouldn’t be used to “get down” on yourself. Reflection should be used to take an honset inventory of what you have accomplished, how you handeled situations, and what you can do better. If you journal everyday (a daily form of reflection) it may be a good time to start going over some of the things that you have written and start to put together a year’s end journal entry. I mean, how else will you write your autobiography?

But, seriously, reflecting on yourself makes you aware of your successes and faults and helps you plan and make goals for the coming year. It makes you a better person.

So, while you are stuffing your face with bird, stuffing, and mashed taters’, remember that the holidays are much more than the superficial things. Use this holiday to become a better person.

Advertising

Featured photo credit: Libby Penner via unsplash.com

Read Next