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Here’s Why Curiosity Is Extremely Important

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Here’s Why Curiosity Is Extremely Important

You may have heard the phrase “curiosity killed the cat” when you were young and let that keep you from living on the edge. Unfortunately, it’s also kept you from excitement, discovery, and passion.

All children are naturally curious about the world around them. They experiment with everything they see, which is why parents of toddlers can be a little neurotic. Ironically, as adults, we tend to lose this inquisitive nature. This is despite knowing more about the world around us and being more capable of exploring safely. Many of us are afraid to take a step outside of our comfort zone because of the potential for injury — whether physical or mental.

However, taking a risk is what sets people like Jane Goodall and Steve Irwin apart from the rest of us. Sure, Jane could have easily not been accepted into gorilla society and could have met with an untimely death. But she wasn’t. Like I said, curiosity can include putting yourself in danger. Steve Irwin was aware of the dangers he faced, but he was the Crocodile Hunter — a legacy that he created through his passion.

Being curious as a child meant going out and jumping in puddles just to see what would happen. Being curious as an adult means doing something you normally wouldn’t do. Perhaps that’s a new sport or an unlikely travel destination. Being frightened or experiencing failure are normal parts of the process. It’s okay to fail. You’ll feel much more satisfied with yourself for trying something new, successful or not, than if you had just spent the day on the couch.

Who knows, the steps you take today might make you world-famous tomorrow.

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    Featured photo credit: Benefits of Being Curious via visual.ly

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    Matt Duczeminski

    A passionate writer who shares lifestlye tips on Lifehack

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    Last Updated on January 13, 2022

    How to Use Travel Time Effectively

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    How to Use Travel Time Effectively

    Most of us associate travel and time with what we’re going to do one we get to our destination. Planning and mapping out what to do once you arrive can certainly make for a more pleasurable vacation, but there are things you can do while you are on your way that can make it even better.

    Sure, you can plan for the things you’re going to do on your vacation while you are travelling en route – but what about making use of that time for other things that you don’t usually do when you’re at home? You don’t need to have your gadgets with you to do it, and you can really connect with yourself if you take the time to manage your life while heading towards your vacation destination.

    Here are some great tips to help you with your time management while you travel, some of which are more conventional than others. Nonetheless, you can find out what works best for you and apply them accordingly depending on when and how you are travelling.

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    1. Take Your Time Getting There

    As I write this, I’m on a flight to San Francisco. Flying is the fastest way to get from place to place, and for many people it’s really the only way to travel.

    But I’ve often taken the train or ferry on trips so that I have extra time without distraction to get more done. I’m not worrying about navigation or lack of space to do what I want to do. Instead I’m able to focus on getting stuff done during the time I’ve got without feeling rushed. For example, when I took the train from Vancouver to Portland, it was an eight hour trip and I managed to get a ton of writing done and closed a lot of open loops. It also was less expensive than flying, which was a bonus.

    Sometimes taking the long way to get somewhere on vacation can be the best thing for you to get somewhere with your life.

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    2. Go Gadget-Free

    This is going to be a tough one for a lot of you. But why do you need to bring your gadgets with you when you go on vacation? It isn’t be a bad idea to leave all but one of them behind, and only pull out that one when you absolutely need to do so. In some countries, you’d be wise to be discreet with them anyway since flaunting them in front of those that are less fortunate than you isn’t a good practice. While it may not seem like flaunting to you, in different cultures it can definitely come across that way.

    If you can’t go gadget-free, then at least go Internet-free. If you use a task management app that requires syncing across your multiple devices to be effective, remember that if you only have the one device with you then it can be the “master device” for the time being and will store your data locally anyway. Just sync up when you get home.

    3. Reflect and Prepare

    Finally, going on any sort of excursion gives you the perfect opportunity to reflect on where you’ve been. The fact you have removed yourself from where you usually are can give you a perspective that you simply can’t get when you’re at home. You may want to journal your thoughts during this time – and by taking more time to get to your destination you’ll have more time to dig deeper into it.

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    After a period of reflection – however long that happens to be – you can then begin to not only prepare for the rest of your travels, you can prepare for the rest of what happens afterward. The reflection period is important, though. You need to really know where you’ve been in order to properly look at where you want to be. Time away from things gives you that chance.

    Conclusion

    Traveling isn’t always about where you’re going and how quickly you can get there. In fact, it’s rarely about that at all.

    More often it’s where you’re at in your head that will dictate how much you benefit from traveling. So don’t just go somewhere fast. Instead, take your time on the way there and take the time to connect with not only where you are but who are while you’re there.

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    If you do that, you’ll have a better chance to be who you want to be when you leave.

    Featured photo credit: bruce mars via unsplash.com

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