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10 Quick Ways To Become A LinkedIn Star

10 Quick Ways To Become A LinkedIn Star
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While we are always told as job seekers and business owners to cultivate a strong and integrated social media profile, a lack of meaningful metrics make it difficult to understand whether or not our efforts have been successful. This task is made even harder by the sheer volume of social media outlets now available, as each has their own specific benefits and unique purposes for users.

Some offer more value than others in the commercial world, however, with LinkedIn arguably the most effective networking tool for professionals. It is also one of the most productive, with recent reports suggesting that the social media jobs platform could add a staggering $2.7 trillion to the global economy. It may even benefit up to 540 million members by the year 2025 and increase global employment by 72 million full-time positions.

To capitalize on LinkedIn’s growing influence as a professional networking tool, you will need to optimize your presence and create a profile that captivates employers or potential partners. Here are 10 simple and time-effective ways in which you can achieve this as an existing user:

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1. Import your existing email contacts

No matter how long you have been using LinkedIn, you are likely to have an older email account that includes the details or previous employers, colleagues and freelance collaborators across multiple industries. Your email is therefore an invaluable source of information that can provide the foundation for successful networking, and LinkedIn allows you to benefit from this by seamlessly importing your contacts and searching for them on the site. This process is automated and takes a matter of moments, while it can boost your number of meaningful connections considerably.

2. Update your profile regularly to reflect your existing status

It is a cardinal sin to neglect your LinkedIn profile page, as this is the first resource that new and existing contacts will see when they search your name. You must therefore be proactive and regularly update your profile where necessary, ensuring that your work portfolio and existing skill-sets are accurately represented at all times. This is particularly important in evolutionary market sectors such as marketing and computer programming, where the requisite skills and training requirements are constantly been updated. By constantly realigning your profile to suit the market, you will remain in demand and in the forefront of employers minds’.

3. Ask your colleagues to leave recommendations and endorsements

The traditional letter of recommendation can make or break a job application, and LinkedIn have a unique feature that enables members to endorse each other’s work within specific job roles and organisations. While some may be loath to ask initially, these recommendations can add credibility to your profile and reinforce both current and future applications. The same can also be said for the websites Skills and Endorsements section, where members champion the skills of others on the basis of previous collaborations. There is strong evidence to suggest that those with a higher number of endorsements will rank more favourably in LinkedIn search results, so it is important to interact with others and share recommendations.

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4. Use existing video testimonials to reinforce your quality of work

The video upload feature on LinkedIn’s profile pages are criminally underused, especially by sole traders or small business owners with a strong, existing consumer base. After all, the vast majority of profile pages look the same, so the use of video can help to distinguish your brand or service even in a competitive market sector. Perhaps the best use of this resource is to record and upload genuine customer or client testimonials’, which are known to increase sale conversion rates across multiple platforms. In this respect, you can use LinkedIn to successfully distinguish your service and capitalize on a satisfied and engaged client base using existing testimonials on your website.

5. Optimize your profile for search

This should be common sense, especially when you compare the functionality of a professional networking resource with a branded website. After all, both are used to increase online visibility and engage others, and just as you would use the principles of SEO to enhance the reach of your website you should optimise your LinkedIn profile for search. To achieve this you simply need to research the keywords that relate to your industry or service, perhaps using Google’s analytical tools to drive accurate results. Then integrate these into your profile as naturally as possible, as this will help to improve your visibility on the site without using text in a repetitive manner.

6. Blog regularly and become a thought leader

The concept of thought leadership is best described as being the entry point into a relationship, whether this is between collaborators or businesses and a potential customer base. LinkedIn is therefore the ideal platform through which to initiate such relationship, especially if you make the most of the sites now universally accessible blogging resource. By committing to create original, relevant and insightful blog posts on a regular basis, you can organically advertise your expertise while also ensuring that your profile ranks well in relation to industry specific keywords. This need not take a huge amount of time either, especially if you focus on creating short and concise posts that hold the reader’s attention.

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7. Use LinkedIn’s trending content tools to publish relevant posts

If you do decide to republish posts, write new blogs or simply share some newsworthy content, you may as well make sure that you are this is in the user’s interests. To help you achieve this, you should take a few moments to use LinkedIn’ own trending content tools, as this will automatically analyse posts and updates before relaying those that are most relevant to you and your connections. This offers you best possible chance of engaging readers and ensures that you optimize your time when creating content.

8. Actively participate in LinkedIn groups

While this may sound time-consuming, it initially requires a willingness to search for relevant, professional groups that are within your industry. By being selective and choosing two or three groups based on their popularity, relevance in terms of keywords and existing membership base, you can then to subscribe to daily updates that are delivered directly to your email inbox. From here you simply need to take five or 10 minutes out of your daily schedule to respond and interact with other members, as you share your insight and build strong professional bonds.

9. Reinforce the values of human interaction

According to research conducted by Econsultancy, 74% of all marketers believe that personalisation increases customer engagement. This is part of a wider trend that is relevant to LinkedIn users, as personal messaging and the underlying values of human interaction remain far more powerful than generic connection requests or overly optimised text. With this in mind, you can improve your networking credentials and appeal by personalising the individual messages that you send to others, even if this is just to show an interest in their activities or business. This will help build longer-lasting and meaningful relationships that deliver value over time.

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10. Create a call to action

On a final note, why not conclude your profile summary with a succinct and relevant call to action? Although this is largely associated with businesses, the psychology of the call to action can easily be applied to individuals who are looking to network with others. So depending on whether you want individual to interact with your blog, visit a website or email you directly, be sure to add a concise call to action that shares this eloquently with other LinkedIn members. The key thing to remember is to keep your call to action relatively brief and clear, while also avoiding any overly optimized or sales-influenced copy that is likely to deter readers.

Featured photo credit: Smi23 / A Name Like Shields Can Make You Defensive via flickr.com

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Last Updated on July 21, 2021

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

How to Make a Reminder Works for You

Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

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Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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Reference

[1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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