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6 Apps That Make You a More Productive Freelance Writer

6 Apps That Make You a More Productive Freelance Writer

As a writer and an active blogger I understand the importance of efficiency, speed, and productivity. There are deadlines to meet, an interesting audience, and clientele to satisfy, so making sure I am productive and efficient at what I do is very important. Thankfully, I have some tools that serve me right in making sure I am getting the job done. I am sharing these resources to make sure other writers can also be informed about such apps that could also really help them improve their productivity. Just click on these headlines below to get the app for yourself and see what I mean.

Write

Write is relatively new, as their Cloud version kicks off mid-summer of 2015. However, there is already a free version of the app which can be downloaded here. What makes Write really cool is that it has a mixture of rich-text functionality of Microsoft Word, the productivity tools of hacker-oriented Sublime, a Zen-like distraction-free experience, and the note-taking capabilities available on Evernote. It is like a combination of several tools all in one. With Write you can create anything from article length pieces to short story sized pieces. You can even do your research and make grocery shopping lists with this multi-use app.

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I really can’t wait for the Cloud version which promises a beautiful dark UI theme and distinctive text styles to match. This would give your documents a classy bookish or modern web-ish look.

WriteChain

What makes WriteChain really cool is that it is simple to use and user friendly. Since WriteChain is free, it doesn’t come with anything fancy like hidden editors or quotes. It is simply a tool that helps writers track their word count on the go. If you are a writer committed to setting daily goals and targets then you’ll need an app that will make you aware and accountable of accomplishing this. That’s why WriteChain will be very helpful. It takes every writing session by counting consecutive daily sessions to measure your “writing chain.” If at any time you skip a session, WriteChain informs you about it.

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Manuscript

While there are many apps that relates to writing and improving your ability, Manuscript helps more intense writers such as book writers to get more out of their work. It offers word count and page count information and supplies you with a Dropbox support. Manuscript is not selective about your document type or size, you can upload any document to it for editing.

iThoughts

Currently regarded as one of the best mind-mapping tool on iOS, iThought is beautiful and easy to use. iThought helps you visually organize your thoughts, information, and ideas. You can use this tool across several devices from your iPhone to your iPad and be more productive. While working on meeting outlines, project planning, and taking reading notes, iThought can offer you sophisticated and usable tools for mind mapping.

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Daedalus Touch

Daedalus Touch was designed to make editing and file organization more fun. It is able to import files or folders from Dropbox, WebDAV, and Box.com. It can even open zipped text files. You could also export documents as single or multiple sheets, or entire stacks of sheets. The export options available include emailing as TXT, PDF, RTF, zip archive, creating an ePub ebook file, printing, converting Markdown styles, copying to the iOS clipboard, or opening documents in other iOS apps.

iaWriter

If you frequently write online, you’ll have to deal with formatting. This can be time consuming. However with iaWriter you can use a markup language to format the posts for html. iaWriter helps you to focus on the more important task of writing rather than on other unpleasant distractions. It also syncs with Dropbox and iCloud if you prefer to write on other platforms.

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Certainly this list is not exhaustive since there are other killer apps out there to get you going and improve your efficiency. Still, it cannot be over-emphasized how important it is to get the right tool to help double on your productivity.

Featured photo credit: http://www.flickr.com via flickr.com

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Casey Imafidon

Specialized in motivation and personal growth, providing advice to make readers fulfilled and spurred on to achieve all that they desire in life.

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Last Updated on May 14, 2019

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

  1. Zoho Notebook
    If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
  2. Evernote
    The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
  3. Net Notes
    If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
  4. i-Lighter
    You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
  5. Clipmarks
    For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
  6. UberNote
    If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
  7. iLeonardo
    iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
  8. Zotero
    Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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