Advertising

If You’re Looking For An Honest Review of Android 5.0 Lollipop, You Can’t Miss This

Advertising
If You’re Looking For An Honest Review of Android 5.0 Lollipop, You Can’t Miss This

Nexus smartphones should receive the new Google update any day now. And this update is more than just a little streamlining and some minor design changes.

Android represents a major shift in how Google and Android want to see themselves. Android’s website on the update notes how Android “powers your watch, your TV, and even your car.” Android wants to be a new OS like Microsoft Windows – but even bigger.

Advertising

The first thing to note is the interface and user design. As great as smartphone and tablet interfaces have been in the past, they still frequently feel like a computer interface with touch options enabled rather than a true touchscreen.

The Lollipop aims to change that. No longer do you have to collapse one window to open another one, which you then have to scrabble about with your finger to reopen at a later time. Google’s new “Material Design” philosophy uses layers and animations to bring a new, interactive feel to this medium.

Advertising

User interface and the design of Android phones after the Lollipop update are important, but what matters is how well the features work now. Lollipop has improved several of its features, including Ring Boost, in order to make its phones more accessible.

Gmail and Google Calendar are much easier to use from a design perspective and from additions made to those apps. You can also now see notifications on your phone when your screen is locked, which means that you do not need to unlock your phone every time your phone makes a noise. A white card will appear with the notification, which makes it more legible.

Advertising

These new features and the design upgrades are fantastic, but the simplest and best upgrade that the Lollipop gives is how it affects your battery life. Something that comes with Lollipop is Project Volta, which shows how much battery your apps are using, how much longer your battery has left, and enables a power-saving mode which Android has not had before now.

So, what do all of these improvements mean? It represents how Google and Android are looking to become more than just a smartphone. They want your phone to be connected to your car, which is connected to your Google desktop, which is connected to all of your other devices.

Advertising

Featured photo credit: Android Police via androidpolice.com

More by this author

5 Focus Hacks To Meet Your Goals 5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With 8 Signs You Have A Strong Personality That Might Scare Some People How to Achieve Quick Success at Work Even If You’re Lacking in Clear Direction You’ll No Longer Be Fooled by Skillful Liars If You Know This Concept

Trending in Technology

1 How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private 2 20 Must-Have iPad Apps /iPhone Apps That You May Be Missing 3 Finally, 20 Productivity Apps That Will Ensure Efficiency 4 8 Useful Apps Every Learner Should Not Miss 5 Protecting Your Online Life With Secure Passwords

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on November 25, 2021

How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

Advertising
How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

    What Does Private Browsing Do?

    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

    Advertising

    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

    The Terminal Archive

    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

    Advertising

    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

    Clearing Your Tracks

    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

    Advertising

    dscacheutil -flushcache

    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

    Advertising

    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

    Read Next