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10 Things You Can Learn From World’s Highly Successful Individuals

10 Things You Can Learn From World’s Highly Successful Individuals
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We all dream of becoming a successful person one day. This specific thought of “becoming a successful individual” has been instilled in our minds ever since we were children. And as we grow up, it seems that our main focus, or target narrows down to this particular concept. We try hard to achieve our goal. We really try hard. But is it really that hard to become a successful person?

Why is it that we see a certain group of people as highly prosperous, while others are considered unfortunate? In order to flourish, you live, make mistakes, and you observe others. The good thing about observing others is, if you are surrounded by that group of successful people, you are likely to have the opportunity to pick their brains. Well, here are 10 skills to aid anyone in becoming a successful person. If you can follow these rules, one day your name will be up there in the ‘hall of successful individuals’.

1. They teach you empathy.

First thing you require is empathy. “To be a great leader is to be a great listener instead of a talker”, says Gary Vaynerchuk, a CEO. In an article The Most Valuable Skill Every Recruiter Overlooks, he writes about the number one skill every employee needs to have. He says, it is not about being organized– the secret lies in being empathy. Empathy provides room for friendship, understanding, rapport, and host of other things that help to build real and lasting relationships within a company.

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2. They want you to “steal” from the greats.

Pablo Picasso once said, “Great artists copy. Great artists steal.” One of the users of Quora, a question-answer based online forum, believes so too. In a recent thread on Quora, Martin Armstrong said that it actually helps to get attached to a great person, whom you look to as a role model. He states, “If you want to be successful, you must learn to steal!” It is not like stealing every idea or every concept from your “model”, but to follow them, to figure out what your model does to make them successful. Follow their footstep, and it will lead you to a path where you have a better future.

3. They teach you to be self-disciplined.

In order to be successful, you must learn the art of self-discipline. Why? Because “without self-discipline, success is impossible”, according to Lou Holtz.

As Brian Tracy, top sales training and personal success authority, and author of more than 60 books, explained in his article, Successful People Are Self Disciplined self discipline is vital in order to prosper in life. Disciplining oneself is a hard task. But it is achievable. And through personal discipline and perseverance, you can obtain any skills.

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4. They wish to be a charismatic person.

Being charismatic can add a great advantage to your life. You don’t have to look like Barbie or Ken, you don’t have to be Richie Rich, and you don’t have to be Dexter– if you have the ability to make people love you naturally, then you have a good chance of becoming successful. Another Quora user, Michael Graham, has written that charismatic people are easily recognized even if they are broke, unintelligent, foolish, and unattractive. According to him, a charismatic person can successfully make other people feel better about themselves, and they have an extraordinary ability to inspire trust around them, amongst other skills.

5. They make you understand that schools don’t guarantee success.

Getting first hand experience rather than depending on what others teach you is often a smart move. In simple words, it’s a faster approach, and a highly effective way to learn things for yourself. Gaining higher education is good. But it can sometimes be overrated too. Erika Andersen wrote an article titled Do You Really Need To Go To College? She wrote about whether a college certificate is essential for success. All in all, success totally depends on you, and you only.

6. They encourage single-tasking.

We all know how much we look up to a person who multi-tasks. Whether that person is your official boss, or your own family member, or your best friend– regardless, we all go, “Oh look! That person is so successful in life because that person does so many things at the same time. What genius!”

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Wrong. In fact, people who multi-task are not being more productive at all. Dr. Jim Taylor of University of San Francisco wrote an article called Multitasking is Out, Single Tasking is In. He elaborated on the fact that single-tasking requires more focus and attention, which eventually makes a person more committed, focused, and disciplined. And these factors play a key role in making one successful.

7. They teach you how to turn hurdles into opportunities.

We face different kinds of obstacles in different stages of life. Many take this as a negative sign. But if you stay negative throughout your journey, you will never reach your destination. Be positive. Survive the storm, turn your hurdles into opportunities. Atul Pradhananga, for example, believes that success lies in how we perceive the obstacles, how we react to them, and how we keep our composure during those times.

8. They make you an expert in saying “no”.

If there is a problem, or something you are disliking, be honest, and say “no”. “No” is a negative term, but if you can master the art of politely saying “no, thanks”, it will be better for both you and your people. Remember, individuals are not emotionally attached to you, so they would prefer honesty over dishonesty. A review by Harvard Business found that part of success lies in saying “no”. It is believed that people who always say “yes” to everything are either afraid to say “no”, or not sure of what they want. And these kind of people usually don’t success in life.

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9. They want a sense of humor.

Success needs three bones: wishbone, backbone, and funnybone” – Unknown.

Forbes magazine published an article on 10 Reasons Why Humor Is A Key To Success At Work. There, they mentioned how tasteful humor is important in a workplace. The majority of people tend to take everything, including themselves, seriously. This article focuses on the differences between a very serious workplace, and an office where humor plays a role of some sort. Humor can make people feel encouraged and comfortable, which is a marvelous art. People who can make a person laugh without hurting that person can tackle any situation, and thus can become successful in life.

10. They teach you patience and confidence.

Besides acquiring a sense of humor, another very significant skill to become successful is having patience, and confidence. Success doesn’t come overnight. It requires plenty of time. You can not simply stop in the middle of the route and give up. You need patience. You also need self motivation to keep you going. And you need confidence. Research shows that a confident person is willing to learn new things and experiment. Therefore, in order to be successful, one must learn to project confidence.

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There are no shortcuts to success. Becoming a millionaire by buying lottery tickets can happen once in a million times. So there’s no point in wasting time in buying lottery tickets, and praying for a jackpot. Go out there, move with the pace every successful person is moving with, make mistakes, learn from them, teach yourself skills, and conquer the world. No, don’t do that. Just conquer your world, be successful, and be content.

Featured photo credit: Quinn Dombrowski via flickr.com

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Sumaiya Kabir

Sumaiya is a passionate writer who shares thoughts and ideas to help people improve themselves.

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Last Updated on July 21, 2021

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

How to Make a Reminder Works for You

Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

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Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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Reference

[1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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