Companies are continually restructuring and employers are always hiring.

Along with constant change in the business world comes constant opportunity to find employment. Every application process has a job interview and there are some things you should keep in the back of your mind when answering interview questions.

Before your next job interview you should know these 8 answers to commonly asked questions:

Question: Tell me about yourself.

Answer: Your answer should be well-rehearsed and be about 2-3 minutes in length. Try to avoid the typical statements about your family and where you’re from, and focus more on your experiences and background that best relate to the job. This is your opportunity to develop a great first impression, so think through a couple of your key achievements to date and mention these as part of the flow of conversation. Keep things lighthearted by throwing in some of your personal interests at the end of your answer.

Question: Why did you leave your last job?

Answer: Your answer should be honest, and you should speak positively about your experience, even if you had a rough time and were made redundant or if you disliked the employer. If you were made redundant, discuss the reason for the company restructuring and focus on the fact that it now allows you to explore your interest in the company you are interviewing for.

Question: What has been your biggest achievement in your career?

Answer: Think of an achievement that you had control or influence over. Choose an example that is work related and preferably one that relates well to the job that you are applying for. Describe the role that you took in making the success and outline how it impacted others and had a benefit for the organisation.

Question: What is a mistake you have made and what did you learn?

Answer: One thing to note is that everyone makes mistakes and you’re interviewer knows this, so the worst answer for this would be to say you don’t make any at all. Instead, describe a real mistake that you made and what the impact was. Note how you quickly addressed this mistake and what actions you took to prevent this mistake from taking place again.

Question: What would you say is your greatest weakness?

Answer: Try to avoid cliches in answering this question such as “I’m a workaholic” or “I’m too efficient for those around me”. Instead, showcase a weakness that is less related to the job, such as difficulty in communicating with someone from a foreign country (only if this is not a core part of your role) or on a weakness that you are taking proactive steps to improve, such as public speaking. Following this, describe the actions you are taking to address this weakness to show that you are focused on your own personal development.

Question: Why have you been out of work for so long?

Answer: Time off from work can arise from a number of different reasons, such as being made redundant, deciding to travel or simply being dismissed. If you left voluntarily to do your own thing—such as traveling, starting your own business or simply taking some time off—then this is the easiest to tackle. If, however, you were made redundant or dismissed, make mention that you have used the opportunity to take the time to re-evaluate where it is that you want to go in your career.

Question: Why do you want to work with our Organisation?

Answer: Your answer should reinforce the fact that you are the best candidate for the role. Show your passion and enthusiasm for not only the role, but also for the product or industry. Perhaps you know of others that have worked in the organisation, or perhaps the company has a fantastic reputation. Just make sure you stay away from suggesting that you just need money or that you don’t have any other employment options.

Question: What are your salary expectations?

Answer: Salaries are not normally negotiated in the interview so you should try avoid this if you can until you get to the offer stage. However, if you are asked this question in an interview, provide your honest answer. You don’t want to sell yourself short by suggesting a salary that you wouldn’t be committed to, and you don’t want to suggest a salary that is extremely high that will make the employer question it further. Instead, give your interviewer a broad salary range that you would be comfortable with and make mention that salary will not matter once you have the opportunity to work for the company.

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