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So you work from home or you telecommute and you need your workspace to be focused, relaxed. It needs to be the right environment to let you kick on with your work and get things done without distractions. At the same time, you want it to be a place you want to be in. If you’re this person, then this lesson is for you, a step by step Lifehack Lesson written by Trevor Dobrygoski that provides the low-down on what to look out for and how to plan and organize your home office creation. It’s free for the first week of publishing, and you can get a subscription to Lifehack Lessons for only $4.99 per month and get access to all the other Lessons.

Here’s an excerpt from this lesson

Lighting

Lighting is probably one of the most overlooked parts of a home office. Having a desk face a window can be great as long as the sun doesn’t shine through the window directly into your eyes halfway through the day. In the summer this can be extremely hot not to mention generally distracting throughout the day. In the same instance, having a window directly behind you can cause quite a bit of glare a computer monitor.

Using natural light sources and light bulbs with a more natural light tone can really make a difference on how tired you feel after a long period of work. The placement of the lights can also come into play. Make sure to have a light behind you and over your work area. This can help reduce eye strain.

Computers and Monitors

A computer and/or monitor is something you don’t really want to skimp on. Since you will be staring at It the majority of the day, you should have something pleasing to the eye and new enough to let you do anything your job could call for. The a choice of laptop or desktop computer will really depend on what you prefer or what is best suited for your job.

Depending on the type of projects you work on, a large monitor or dual monitor setup would be ideal. Even if you use a laptop most the time, having an additional monitor, maybe something mounted on the wall like a flatscreen, can really help when you have lots of programs and documents open.

Make sure the monitor or monitors are placed far enough away where you aren’t straining to read without the screen. The less eyestrain you have, the longer you be able to work without fatigue. The height of the monitor can play a big role in fatigue as well. If the monitor is too high, it can cause shoulder and back pain. If the monitor is too low it can cause neck pain.

Featured photo credit: Home office luxury interior with green walls and wood via Shutterstock

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