All the stops have been pulled for the big interview. Every interviewee knows how important it is to shine. Yet, in the back of your mind you feel worried. Perhaps it is your work history, challenges with co-workers, or something else. Get prepped. Study ahead with these tips for addressing even the toughest interview questions.

Tell Me About Your Work History.

Work history gaps need not present a problem. In order to address the issue, think of how you used your time during those periods. Volunteer work is certainly valid in learning new skills and honing old ones. Note time spent in continuing education classes learning worthwhile skills that will benefit this new employer. If there were extenuating circumstances that caused the gap, such as caring for family or an accident, explain the situation as clearly and briefly as possible.

What Are Your Weaknesses?

This is likely one of the most hated, yet most common interview questions. Which is precisely why it is used: interviewers want to know how you handle your personal flaws. Start with the negative. Keep the answer in relation to your work, such as fear of public speaking or flawed computer skills. Emphasize that you are on a learning curve and are actively working to improve on the identified weakness. This shows your initiative and willingness to address your weakness.

Why Were You Fired?

Definitely a tough question and a potentially embarrassing one if this has happened to you. It is entirely appropriate to write out a script and memorize verbatim. Remember to relax while giving your spiel about this difficulty. Absolutely avoid the temptation to make the old employer look bad. This tactic never works and has the reverse effect. Of course the experience was bitter and heart-wrenching; however, the interview room is not the place for these emotions.

What Challenges Have You Faced With Co-Workers?

For many reasons some people are simply tough to get along with, especially in the work place. The key here is, again, to stay away from being too critical or negative. Think of a time when there was a control issue or dissent in the workplace and how the situation was handled positively. People don’t always get along and the interviewer wants to know how you solved the problem with diplomacy and aplomb. Again, scripting your answer will help.

What Is Your Long-Range Objective?

Here is a great time to review the job description of a place in the company where you see yourself within the company. For example, as a supervisor or moving into a consulting position or as the company’s top accountant. Tailor your answer to within the scope of the company a few rungs above where you are now. Avoid telling the interviewer that you’ll be in their job in a few years. You don’t want to be perceived as a threat reveal that you don’t plan on remaining very long.

Why Do You Want To Work Here?

The key here is to emphasize that you have done your homework and have chosen this particular company. Review the job description and elaborate on a few of the skills that you have to offer and their benefit to the company. Talk about the company’s offerings or services and what you found to be useful. This could be the product itself or the ease of navigating the web site. Let the interviewer know that you are aware of the company’s history or future projects. The point is to let the potential employer know that you have researched the company and are enthusiastic about working there.

Featured photo credit: Business people sitting in a row and writing notes. Close-up of writing hands. via shutterstock.com

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