You see a job posting and automatically you know it would be the perfect job for you. Your qualifications match, it would present you with career growth opportunities, and you know you’d bring great value to the company. In short, it’s your dream job.

You get the call for your interview, whether it’s in person or through online video, and you feel ready. Before you head out the door or fire up your webcam, however, know there are plenty of little pitfalls which can come between you and your dream job. With 7.9 percent unemployment, even a tiny mistake can be the opening another qualified candidate needs to leapfrog over you and get the job.

So what are the common mistakes you need to avoid to ace your interview? Here are five questions your interviewer should never ask themselves at any point during your meeting:

What Are You Wearing?

It might be spring, but that doesn’t mean you should show up for your interview with a pastel-hued wardrobe. When the calendar flips to summer, the heat will be no excuse for donning a pair of shorts on such a formal occasion. You know the saying, “the clothes make the man”? Well in the interview, wearing the wrong thing can mean immediate disqualification before you even open your mouth.

Studies have revealed that first impressions are formed a mere 7 to 17 seconds after meeting. In 7 seconds, all your interviewer will have to go by will be your interview attire. This is why it’s imperative to dress conservatively and professionally—this is no time for a fashion show! Even if the office environment is more a T-shirt than suit jacket kind of place, the interview is no time to be taking fashion risks.

Why Are You Late?

Just like wearing a pair of flip-flops and board shorts, showing up late for your interview can be grounds for immediate dismissal. Your interviewer is taking time out of his or her busy schedule to squeeze you in. Be cognizant of this fact, and leave your house or office with plenty of time to spare.

You might not think you need the extra time, but there are plenty of obstacles life can throw at you. You could get lost going to an unfamiliar neighborhood, or get stuck in a traffic pile up. Remember, it’s better to be early than late when it comes to your interview.

If you’re far away and think it might be hard to get to your interview on time, perhaps you should suggest a video interview. This way you can fire up your webcam from the comfort of your own home. Just remember, there’s no excuse on earth for being late to your video interview. Make sure to check out your equipment in advance so you don’t run into any technical difficulties.

You Really Don’t Know Anything About the Company?

One of the most common interview mistakes, and one of the most easily remedied, is showing up for the meeting without knowing anything about the company. “So what does this company do?” is never an acceptable question to ask your interviewer.

Before showing up for your meeting, take some time to research the company. Start with their corporate website and social media properties, then expand your reach to any news about the organization. Maybe you can even connect on social media with current or former employees to find out more about the company culture. Whatever you do, don’t go into the interview without doing your homework.

Is That Your Phone Ringing?

There is nothing so important it cannot wait until you get out of an interview, so be sure to turn off all sounds on your phone before going in for your meeting. This means turning your phone off vibrate too. While a loud ring is distracting, the constant sound of your phone vibrating in your bag can be just as bad. You know you’re a popular person—there’s no need for your interviewer to know it as well.

What Did You Just Say About Your Former Employer?!

Perhaps your last job was terrible. Your boss resembled Michael Scott from NBC’s comedy The Office, and not in a good way. Your coworkers were meaner than Johnny Lawrence from the Karate Kid, and the office cafeteria food was just terrible.

We’ve all been there, and we can all relate, but these stories of workplace woe belong at Happy Hour with your friends, not in an interview for a new position. You might think  that badmouthing your last office is a good tactic to explain why you were fired or why you want to make the switch to a new position. It is, however, a terrible idea.

Interviewers will think if you’re willing to badmouth a former employer, you’ll be willing to throw a new company under the bus as well. Go for discretion instead of full confession, and try to spin your former experiences in a positive way and make it about what you learned, not how much you hated your former job.

Interviews can be stressful, which can lead to little mistakes that add up to big trouble for your prospects. Focus on avoiding some of the most common errors, and you’ll be well on your way to nabbing the job of your dreams!

What are some common interview mistakes to avoid? Share in the comments!

Preparing for an interview? Here's an article that can help you: 64 Interview Answers You Should Know

Featured photo credit: Stressful people waiting for job interview via Shutterstock

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