Most of us know about mind-mapping already; we know that it can help us create amazing overviews and give us a lot of clarity. Today I would like to talk with you about the wonderful synergy between mind-mapping and books.

The way most people create mind maps is by taking notes or by jotting down their thoughts and ideas, and that’s a good method, but there is an additional way you can use mind maps to your advantage.

Mind Mapping and Writing

Have you ever written a book? More and more people are walking around with the idea of writing a book (or at least sharing their ideas and thoughts with the world), and you can do that as well—but where to start, right?

There is a very easy method for writing books with mind-mapping strategies. The first thing you need to do is outline your ideas in a mind map. One easy way to do this is by creating a number of chapters, each represented by a new branch. Then, you add subjects you’d like to discuss in that chapter as topics to that branch.

Here’s the smart thing that most people won’t do, but can actually let you save a lot of time and energy: open the notes section of each node in your mind map. Next, start explaining your idea in that text field. Is it ready? Then you move on to the next one. Are you stuck? Move on anyway, making the text of the previous node bold (so you know the text isn’t ready). Proceed until you have all nodes discussed and you have your document ready.

You’re almost done—all you need to do is transform it into a proper book format. This is done by exporting it to Microsoft Word, for example. Most mind mapping tools can do this: the topics on the branches are turned into headlines, while the note text becomes the paragraph text.

There you have it! Your own book, based on the mind map you created.

Mind Mapping and Reading

Have you ever felt overwhelmed by the books you read? Are you highlighting all the text except for the page numbers? There should be a more effective way to do this, and there is. A quick and simple way to read books and remember more of what you read is by mind-mapping your notes.

The next time you read a book, create a new mind map. Make branches for the chapters (or paragraphs) you will be reading first: this is done without actually reading the book yet. Simply take headings and create a mind map structure of the book. Then you start reading the book, adding notes to the map as you go. One simple way is by taking the paragraph and other headlines, and adding highlighted, bold, italic, or other keywords to the map.

Before you know it, you have a summary of the book. (If you’re doing this the smart way, it could even be without actually reading the book itself!). Then, take your mind map and keep it as a guideline for reading and studying. The map itself gives you the big tour through the book, and you just need to add new ideas and thoughts when you are doing more comprehensive reading.

And Now it’s Up to You

There you have it: a way to write your own book (or document, report, article, etc.) and a method for transforming books into practical and useful mind maps. What will you do with this knowledge?

Here are some action points to help you start applying this theory in your own life:

Action Point 1: If you don’t have a book waiting inside you yet, write the story of your own life. When you would write such a book 30 years in the future, what branches and subjects would it include? What would the story of your life tell, inspire, and show others?

Action Point 2: Grab a book that you should read and outline it using the mind map method I shared with you. Do you have a better sense of the content now?

Action Point 3: Think about a book you don’t really want to read, but have to. The book might be difficult to understand—how would you use the two techniques to make a version of it that’s easier to comprehend? (Hint: use both techniques for this.)

Good luck mind-mapping, writing, and reading. I am confident you will be able to save a lot of time and get a good sense of your books and information this way. Below, feel free to share how you would use this technique in your life. Remember to use it at least once, and know when to stop mind mapping as well.

Let's explore five important reasons why you can or must stop mind mapping immediately: 5 Reasons To Stop Mind Mapping Immediately

Featured photo credit: shelves via Flickr

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