Whether you’re a cubicle dweller, a student, a business person, or a CEO, there comes a time in your life that requires you to write. if you’re currently on one now, these strategies will help you unblock your writer’s block.

1. Ditch the “I’m just not a writer” syndrome.

Everybody has enough potential to write. Persistently contradicting this is just a convenient excuse. Instead, do the opposite. Tell yourself–”I can write” and you’ll give yourself a shot in the arm.

2. Write messy drafts.

If you aim to produce flawless lines right away, you’ll work in fear. Go ahead and scribble all your thoughts. Just let go. Don’t think of grammar, punctuation, or structure yet. The important thing is, you can record what is in your mind. Think–baby steps. Don’t expect to be able to write good paragraphs upon hitting your keyboard. You’ll be more overwhelmed if you do this. After producing a draft, you can go back and revise all you want.

3. Converse with yourself–orally (Just make sure no one hears you doing it!) 

It’s much easier for many of us to chat with a friend over a Cup O’ Joe than to compose a business proposal (even if the details of the dialogue is the business proposal itself). Generally, in chitchats, it’s accepted that we correct our mistakes as we talk. It’s wise to give yourself this kind of freedom when writing. If that is even hard to accomplish, converse with yourself orally just to get your thoughts out into a nice flow.

4. Re-position words, sentences, paragraphs on your draft like puzzle pieces.

The nice thing about writing on a computer is that you can move words and phrases with minimal effort. With this thought alone, I’m sure you’ll find it easier to get into your writing flow.

In case you’re overwhelmed with too much ideas bumping each other around in your brain, put those ideas onto paper, one by one. Accomplish this step by using a system that’s a cross between a simple list notes and an organized outline. Next, slowly dive into your list, turning concepts into sentences, then sentences into paragraphs. While doing this, don’t worry about forgetting critical stuff.

5. Summarize your points.

When composing a sales pitch, a business proposal, or a just a simple speech of introduction, the gist of the matter is, you do your assignment–research and know exactly what you need to communicate. If you struggle to write, it could mean, you’re confused about some details of your work. If you’re having this predicament, the solution is brevity. Go for shorter phrases and sentences. You’ll have a better chance of producing a concise, well written piece with this strategy.

Original Source: 8 Writing Strategies for People Who Say They Can’t Write by  CATHERINE CLIFFORD via Entrepreneur.com

Featured photo credit: Writer’s block/Adam Lyon via flickr.com

Love this article?