In his best-selling book, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens, Sean Covey states, “We become what we repeatedly do,” and this advice isn’t just for teens. In other words, our habits make us who we are. If we are repeatedly late to work or we cancel plans with friends regularly, our reputation begins to proceed us — and not in a positive way. The cultivation of good habits is essential in order to be taken seriously, feel good about ourselves, and live a positive life. Here are a few good habits you should start right now:

Find a group of people with similar interests

Within this group, you will find people who will be able to relate to you like others cannot. You will cultivate lifelong relationships and find a sense of belonging.

Let go of distraction

Give your attention to whatever’s in front of you. Stay in the moment and your relationships will benefit, as well as your peace of mind. Letting go of distractions will increase your mindfulness, which can lead to less stress and a more positive outlook.

Floss

Daily. Flossing is linked not only to healthy teeth, but to heart health as well. Fight gum disease, increase the potential to keep your teeth for life, and potentially lower your risk of heart disease, all while cultivating a good habit.

Multitask less

Put the phone and tablet away. Turn the television off. Devote your attention to the task at hand. Multitasking can lead to spotty work or half-done assignments or duties, so you are more effective if you focus on one thing at a time.

Spend time with yourself

You need a little alone time. It allows you to relax and let go of your daily struggle. Being alone also gives you time to reflect without distraction.

Create a visual representation of motivation

Usually referred to as a vision board, placing your goals and dreams on a poster board or the like can keep you focused. That visual representation helps remind you to keep pushing forward and striving toward your greatest good.

Set some goals

And make sure they are obtainable. It’s important to have both short-term and long-term goals. For example, if you want to eat healthier, set a goal for one healthy meal per week for a month. Then increase it to two healthy meals and so on. If you do this, before you know it, you’ll be eating well and feeling great.

Journal regularly

This is one of the easiest ways to get those feelings and thoughts out of you and onto paper. Writing in a journal on a regular basis can keep you on track with your goals and release tension.

Find a morning or evening routine and stick to it

Choose 20 to 30 minutes, either in the morning or at night, where you can create a little routine you can stick to. Meditate, write in your journal, read something inspiring, or use this time to focus on your passions.

Strive to learn something new every day

If you are a writer, learn a new word and find a way to use it. If you read, look up some info about an author you admire. Research some news about another country. Learning helps you stay open minded and connected to the world around you.

Let go of comparison

It doesn’t matter if the person beside you in yoga class can contort their body in ways you can’t. If you stop comparing yourself to others, you’re more apt to be happy with who you are. Rather than compare your progress or success to those around you, seek to improve on your own accomplishments.

Save some money, even if it’s just a little

Just five dollars a week will add up before you know it. Saving money constitutes discipline, which is necessary in all areas of life. Take out cash to spend for the week so you don’t have to touch your bank account. If you give yourself an ‘allowance,’ you’ll become more responsible with your income.

Strive to be on time

Arriving at your destination on time (or even better — early) shows that you care about other people’s time. This doesn’t just apply to work either. Show up on time for family events and outings with your friends.

Do you have any other good habits to suggest? Leave them in the comments below.

Featured photo credit: Meditation/Toshimasa Ishibashi via flickr.com

Love this article? Share it with your friends on Facebook