How To Do Sushi

Some people are afraid of trying sushi. I find one of the best ways to overcome insecurities and fears is knowledge. So for whatever reason you may not want to try sushi, here is an in depth article on the traditions, tastes, mechanics and etiquette for eating at a sushi bar.

Warning signs that you probably won’t get good sushi

  • 1. The fish and other seafood are not on display at the sushi bar
  • 2. The fish and other seafood on display look dry
  • 3. The sushi chef or (worse) a food server wants to take your order for all sushi items at once
  • 4. The sushi chef doesn’t give you a chance to order “one or two pieces at a time”, Japanese style
  • 5. The restaurant advertises “all you can eat sushi” for a fixed price
  • 6. The menu items are not listed in Japanese followed by a translation; they appear only in your native language
  • 7. The menu consists mostly of rolled sushi with names like California Roll or Oriental Delight
  • 8. More than half of the available ingredients are cooked
  • 9. The sushi chef hasn’t the vaguest idea of what you’re talking about if you ask for kazunoko, shiso, inago, chirashi, or yama gobo
  • 10. The morsels of fish atop nigiri pieces are so large that you can barely see the rice underneath (believe it or not, some people think that the sushi place is good because you get big pieces of fish). Big pieces of fish are good as long as the fish quality is good.
  • 11. The sushi rice is flavorless; sushi rice must have a delicate aroma and flavor
  • 12. The restaurant is part of a chain or franchise
  • Sushi Eating How To – [EugeneCiurana]

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