1. Sarcoline: According to encyclo.co, Sarcoline literally means flesh-colored. For the ladies, I got a tip for you (this one I got from a super model–wear a sarcoline colored high heels and you’ll look taller ’cause your legs will look longer.)

2. Mikado: It’s a title given to an emperor in Japan. A comic opera written by W.S. Gilbert. It’s also one of the boldest yellows I know.

3. Coquelicot: It’s the color of the plant’s flower that is red but is tinted orange, giving it a unique blend of the two colors. It’s vernacular term for wild corn poppy.

4. Glaucous: Wikepedia says it’s “bluish-grey or green”. It is used to describe the pale grey or bluish-green appearance of birds and of some plants. Sometimes it’s compared to the powdery color of grapes.

5. Smaragdine means emerald green. Emerald is one of most  beautiful gemstones. It’s a variety of the beryl; a mineral that’s colored green due to trace amounts of chromium and sometimes vanadium. When you see the color smaragdine, you’ll remember emeralds.

6. Xanadu: It is a place of indescribable beauty, beyond luxury, and unspeakable contentment. The color of the philodendron leaf. A nice blend of gray and green that has a calming effect.

7. Wenge: If you watch those house makeover shows on TV, you might have heard of the color wenge. A dark brown color of wood with the masculine undertones of copper. Wenge wood comes from the endangered legume tree known as Millettia laurentii, so it becomes rarer by the hour.

8. Falu: It’s the red paint popularly used for barns and wooden cottages. The paint got its origins in the copper mines of Falun, Dalarna in Sweden. Till now it is still widely used because its an effective preservative for wood. 

9. Amaranth: The color of the flowers of the amaranth plants. Obviously, the ones which have amaranth red colored flowers. It was in the year 1680 when it was first recorded to have been used to identify amaranth as a name of a particular color.

10. Fulvous: It is at times referred to as a brownish-yellow, or a dull reddish-yellow; sometimes tawny, and it can also be equated to a variation of beige, buff, or even butterscotch. It has also been used to describe certain varieties of fungi to identify a color with greater specificity.

11. Eburnean: It is the color of ivory. If you have the eyes of a painter, or perhaps a good photographer, you will notice that eburnean is not really white. It has a touch of very light yellow. So, the phrase as white as ivory is in effect a misnomer.

Original Source: 11 Colors You’ve Probably Never Heard Of by Amanda Green via Mental floss

Featured photo credit: Rainbow in my hand/Laurence and Annie via Flickr.com via flickr.com

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